Last modified on 17 July 2014, at 19:08

élite

See also: elite and Elite

EnglishEdit

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from French élite

AdjectiveEdit

élite (comparative more élite, superlative most élite)

  1. Alternative spelling of elite.
    • 2002, Clive Jones and Emma Murphy, Israel: Challenges to Identity, Democracy, and the State‎, page 27 (Routledge; ISBN 9780415270878)
      Ben-Gurion’s legacy has been an enduring one. The projection of a national consensus, the domination of the state over other political actors, and the hegemony exercised over decision-making by a largely Ashkanazim élite remain features of Israeli politics today.
    • 2009, Farhad Manjoo, Is Wikipedia a Victim of Its Own Success?, page 2 (TIME.COM, Monday Sep. 28, 2009)
      Over time, though, a class system emerged; now revisions made by infrequent contributors are much likelier to be undone by élite Wikipedians.

NounEdit

élite (plural élites)

  1. Alternative spelling of elite.
    • 1951, Isaac Asimov, Foundation (1974 Panther Books Ltd publication), part III: “The Mayors”, chapter 6, page 101, ¶ 5
      A hush had fallen over the élite in the ballroom, as a broad path was cleared for the throne. Lepold sat on it now, hands solidly on its arms, head high, face frozen.

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Feminine of élit, old past participle of verb élire.

NounEdit

élite f (plural élites)

  1. elite

External linksEdit


ItalianEdit

NounEdit

élite f

  1. elite

Derived termsEdit


SpanishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from French élite

NounEdit

élite f (plural élites)

  1. elite