Last modified on 29 April 2015, at 17:41

μαθηματικός

Ancient GreekEdit

EtymologyEdit

From μάθημα (máthēma, learning; mathematics) +‎ -ικός (-ikós, -ic), from μανθάνω (manthánō, I learn) +‎ -μα (-ma)

PronunciationEdit

 

AdjectiveEdit

μᾰθηᾰτῐκός (mathēatikósm, μᾰθημᾰτῐκή f, μᾰθημᾰτῐκόν n; first/second declension

  1. scientific, esp. mathematical
    • 384 BCE – 322 BCE, Aristotle, Metaphysics 992.b.1
      ἔτι δὲ τὴν ὑποκειμένην οὐσίαν ὡς ὕλην μαθηματικωτέραν ἄν τις ὑπολάβοι
      Further, one might regard the substance which they make the material substrate as too mathematical.
    1. (substantive) mathematics
      • 384 BCE – 322 BCE, Aristotle, Metaphysics 1026.a
        ἀλλ᾽ ἔστι καὶ ἡ μαθηματικὴ θεωρητική: ἀλλ᾽ εἰ ἀκινήτων καὶ χωριστῶν ἐστί
        And mathematics is also speculative; but it is not clear at present whether its objects are immutable and separable from matter.
  2. astronomical
  3. astrological

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

μᾰθημᾰτῐκός (mathēmatikós) (genitive μᾰθημᾰτῐκοῦ); gender unknown

  1. mathematician
    • 384 BCE – 322 BCE, Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics 1142.a.17
      ἐπεὶ καὶ τοῦτ᾽ ἄν τις σκέψαιτο, διὰ τί δὴ μαθηματικὸς μὲν παῖς γένοιτ᾽ ἄν, σοφὸς δ᾽ ἢ φυσικὸς οὔ.
      One might indeed further inquire why it is that, though a boy can be a mathematician, he cannot be a metaphysician or a natural philosopher.
  2. (Pythagoreanism) advanced student

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit


GreekEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek μαθηματικός (mathēmatikós, mathematical).

AdjectiveEdit

μαθηματικός (mathimatikósm,  feminine: μαθηματική (mathimatikí), neuter: μαθηματικό (mathimatikó)

  1. mathematical

DeclensionEdit

NounEdit

μαθηματικός (mathimatikósm, f

  1. mathematician
  2. maths teacher (UK), math teacher (US)

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit