Last modified on 29 October 2014, at 12:52

νεκρός

Ancient GreekEdit

EtymologyEdit

From νέκυς (nékus, a dead body), from Proto-Indo-European suffixed full-grade *nekro- of *neḱ- (perish, disappear); see also Middle Welsh angheu (death), Breton ankou, Old Irish éc, Latin noxius (harmful), Latin nocēre (to hurt, harm), Latin nex (murder, violent death) (as opposed to mors), Old Persian [script needed] (vi-nathayatiy, he injures), Avestan [script needed] (nasyeiti, disappears), [script needed] (nasu-, corpse), Sanskrit नश्यति (naśyati, disappear, perish)

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

νεκρός (nekrósm, νεκρά f, νεκρόν n; first/second declension

  1. dead

InflectionEdit

NounEdit

νεκρός (nekrós) (genitive νεκροῦ) m, second declension

  1. a dead body, corpse
  2. one who is dead (in plural: the dead)
  3. dying person

InflectionEdit

SynonymsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


GreekEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek νεκρός (nekrós).

AdjectiveEdit

νεκρός (nekrósm,  feminine: νεκρή (nekrí), neuter: νεκρό (nekró)

  1. dead

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

NounEdit

νεκρός (nekrósm (plural νεκροί, feminine νεκρή)

  1. dead man

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit