Last modified on 23 February 2015, at 07:11

νεκρός

Ancient GreekEdit

EtymologyEdit

From νέκυς (nékus, a dead body), from Proto-Indo-European suffixed full-grade *nekro- of *neḱ- (perish, disappear); see also Middle Welsh angheu (death), Breton ankou, Old Irish éc, Latin noxius (harmful), Latin nocēre (to hurt, harm), Latin nex (murder, violent death) (as opposed to mors), Old Persian 𐎻𐎴𐎰𐎹𐎫𐎹 (vi-nathayatiy, he injures), Avestan 𐬥𐬀𐬯𐬌𐬌𐬈𐬌𐬙𐬌 (nasyeiti, disappears), 𐬥𐬀𐬯𐬎 (nasu-, corpse), Sanskrit नश्यति (naśyati, disappear, perish)

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

νεκρός (nekrósm, νεκρά f, νεκρόν n; first/second declension

  1. dead

InflectionEdit

NounEdit

νεκρός (nekrós) (genitive νεκροῦ) m, second declension

  1. a dead body, corpse
  2. one who is dead (in plural: the dead)
  3. dying person

InflectionEdit

SynonymsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


GreekEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek νεκρός (nekrós).

AdjectiveEdit

νεκρός (nekrósm,  feminine: νεκρή (nekrí), neuter: νεκρό (nekró)

  1. dead

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

NounEdit

νεκρός (nekrósm (plural νεκροί, feminine νεκρή)

  1. dead man

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit