See also: nik

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From the Slavic suffix (Russian: -ник (-nik)). This suffix experienced a surge in English coinages for nicknames and diminutives after the 1957 Soviet launch of the first Sputnik satellite. English usage is heavily influenced by Yiddish usage of -nik and similar borrowed words (nogoodnik, nudnik, kibbutznik).

SuffixEdit

-nik

  1. Appended to words to create a nickname for a person who exemplifies, endorses, or is associated with the thing or quality specified (by the base form), often a particular ideology or preference.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

External linksEdit

  • 1990 Autumn, V. V. Kabakchi; Doyle, Charles Clay, “Of Sputniks, Beatniks, and Nogoodniks”, American Speech, volume 65, number 3, JSTOR 455919, pages 275-278: 

OjibweEdit

SuffixEdit

-nik (plural)

  1. arm
    ingodonikone arm; one armlength
    midaasonikten arms; ten armlengths
    jiiskinikebizonbracelet; garter
    minikeyaabarmband; bracelet
    ninikmy arm
    gichinikright hand

Related termsEdit

  • -nike

PolishEdit

SuffixEdit

-nik m

  1. Forms masculine nouns referring to a performer of some action, sometimes a device; -er

DeclensionEdit

Personal nouns:

Impersonal nouns:

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *-(ь)nikъ, itself originally by nominalization of adjectives in *-ьnъ with the suffix *-ikъ (whence -ik). The suffix originates from Proto-Balto-Slavic period; compare with dialectal Lithuanian lauk-inykas (peasant, farmer) (from laũkas (field)) and Old Prussian lauk-inikis (vassal).

SuffixEdit

-nik (Cyrillic spelling -ник)

  1. Suffix appended to nominal stems to create a masculine noun, usually denoting a profession, performer, place, object, tool or a feature.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Petar Skok (1971), Etimologijski rječnik hrvatskoga ili srpskoga jezika, Zagreb: JAZU, volume I, page 515
Last modified on 7 November 2013, at 17:44