Last modified on 6 February 2015, at 21:45

-ot

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin -ottus (a kind of).

SuffixEdit

-ot

  1. A suffix used to form a masculine noun from a feminine noun that is a particular type of the root.
  2. A suffix used to form a masculine noun from a feminine noun that that is the male with the root being the female.

Derived termsEdit


FrenchEdit

SuffixEdit

-ot

  1. A diminutive indicator for certain words, functioning similarly to the more common -et. Used for some names, such as Pierrot.

Derived termsEdit

  • -oter (diminutive indicator for verbs)

HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

-o- +‎ -t (accusative suffix)

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-ot

  1. (accusative suffix) Used to form the accusative case.
    ablak (window) → Kinyitotta az ablakot. - She opened the window.
    nagy (big) → nagyot sóhajt - to have a deep sigh
    hat (six) → Hány könyvet vettél? - Hatot. - How many books did you buy? - Six.

Usage notesEdit

  • (accusative suffix): It can be added to nouns, adjectives, numerals and pronouns. Whether a suffix-initial vowel (linking vowel) will be used is hard to predict and thus needs to be learned with each word. A rule of thumb, however, is that older and shorter words tend to incorporate a vowel, rather than simply use -t. Variants:
    -t is added to words ending in a vowel. Final -a changes to -á-. Final -e changes to -é-. Final -o in foreign words changes to -ó-.
    -ot is added to some back vowel words ending in a consonant
    -at is added to some back vowel words ending in a consonant
    -et is added to unrounded front vowel words ending in a consonant
    -öt is added to rounded front vowel words ending in a consonant

See alsoEdit


VolapükEdit

SuffixEdit

-ot

  1. Used to indicate a harder or more serious example.

Derived termsEdit