EnglishEdit

NounEdit

7-11 (plural 7-11s)

  1. Any of a chain of 24-hour convenience stores found across North America.
    • 1983, in David Ray (editor), New letters Reader II: An Anthology of Contemporary Writing,[1] University of Missouri-Kansas City, page 9:
      “Sarah,” I said. “This is the tackiest display of poor taste I’ve ever seen. I mean, you might as well turn the whole house into a 7-11.”
    • 1997, Brady Udall, Letting Loose the Hounds: Stories, page 16:
      A scholarship from UCLA, a boring job at an electronics firm and suspicious looks from the clerk whenever I go into a 7-11.
    • 1999, Vic Armijo, The Complete Idiot's Guide to Cycling, page 104:
      These days, a cyclist in bike shorts can walk into a 7-11 or bagel shop without drawing a second glance.
    • 2004, United States Congress, House Committee on Government Reform, Subcommittee on Criminal Justice, Drug Policy, and Human Resources, To Do No Harm: Strategies for Preventing Prescription Drug Abuse, page 279:
      My patients are NOT lying on the couch collecting welfare but rather helping you when you buy a car, go into a 7-11 or build a house.

Proper nounEdit

7-11

  1. A chain of 24-hour convenience stores found across North America.
    • 1968, Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, page 368:
      The 7-11 store is a conveniently located "quick-stop" store in Blacksburg and consequently caters to a large proportion of the local inhabitants.
    • 2004, Simon Frith, Popular Music: Critical Concepts in Media and Cultural Studies, page 380:
      It is likewise inappropriate to sink into prolonged intramusical contemplation when one is squeezed into a 7-11-type convenience store.
    • 2006, Jerry Van Hoorelbeke, Underworld Secrets: Hoffa to Las Vegas, page 514:
      I finally pulled into a 7-11 store and bought a bottle of mouthwash so we could both rinse our mouths out.
Last modified on 16 February 2014, at 11:17