Last modified on 3 December 2014, at 12:57

Appendix:English dictionary-only terms

The following is a list of putative words that have entries in two or more general English dictionaries, but that have two or fewer attested uses. Notable ghost words are also included for the sake of completeness.

Homonyms and individual senses of attested words are not included. This is due to the comparative difficulty of verifying non-attestability in such cases.

AEdit

word part of speech etymology definition dictionaries including this word uses[1]
ablectick (ablecticke) adjective from putative Latin ablectus, probable error for abiectus in Plautus set out or adorned for sale
  • 1623, Cockeram [as noun, "ablecticke"]
  • 1656, Blount
  • 1658, Phillips
  • 1676, Coles
  • 1888, NED Volume 1 (also in OED2, OED3 draft)
1
abligurie (abligury) noun from Latin abligurio prodigal spending on food and drink
  • 1623, Cockeram
  • 1626, Minsheu
  • 1847, Halliwell [as "abligury"]
  • 1888, NED Volume 1 (also in OED2, OED3 draft)
0
abligurition noun from Latin abliguritio prodigal spending on food and drink
  • 1742, Bailey
  • 1888, NED Volume 1
0
ablocate verb from Latin abloco to let out for hire
  • 1623, Cockeram
  • 1721, Bailey
  • 1755, Johnson
  • 1828, Webster
  • 1888, NED Volume 1 (also in OED2, OED3 draft)
  • 1890, Century
2[2]
ablocation noun from Latin ablocatio a letting out for hire
  • 1663, Bullokar
  • 1731, Bailey
  • 1755, Johnson
  • 1828, Webster
  • 1888, NED Volume 1
  • 1890, Century
0
abnodate verb from Latin abnodo to prune a tree, removing the knots
  • 1656, Blount
  • 1823, Crabb
  • 1888, NED Volume 1 (also in OED2, OED3 draft)
  • 1909, Webster's New International
0
abnodation noun abnodate + -ion; possibly from Latin abnodatio the pruning of a tree, removing the knots
  • 1658, Phillips
  • 1755, Johnson
  • 1888, NED Volume 1 (also in OED2, OED3 draft)
  • 1909, Webster's New International
0
abripe adjective from Latin abripere to ravish or rape
  • 1623, Cockeram
  • 2009, OED3 draft
0
abriped adjective abripe + -d ravished
  • 1623, Cockeram
  • 1888, NED Volume 1 (also in OED2, OED3 draft)
0
abrodietical (abrodieticall) noun/adjective from Ancient Greek ἁβροδίαιτος a delicate person/delicate
  • 1623, Cockeram [as noun]
  • 1625, Minsheu [as "abrodieticall"] [as noun and adjective]
  • 1656, Blount [as adjective]
  • 1857, Wright [as "abrodieticall"] [as noun]
  • 1888, NED Volume 1 (also in OED2, OED3 draft) [as adjective]
1
accorporate (adcorporate) verb from Latin accorporo to unite
  • 1623, Cockeram [as "adcorporate"]
  • 1658, Phillips [as "adcorporate"]
  • 1676, Coles [as "adcorporate"]
  • 1732, Bailey [as "adcorporate"]
  • 1755, Johnson [as "adcorporate"]
  • 1882, Imperial
  • 1888, NED Volume 1 (also in OED2, OED3 draft)
  • 1913, Webster's Revised Unabridged
1
acerote[3] adjective having the nature of brown bread
  • 1623, Cockeram [only as "acerote bread"]
  • 1625, Minsheu
  • 1704, Cocker
  • 1847, Halliwell
  • 1880, Wright
  • 1888, NED Volume 1 (also in OED2, OED3 draft)
  • 1890, Century
0
acersecomic noun from Latin acersecomes someone whose hair has never been cut
  • 1623, Cockeram [as "acersecomicke"]
  • 1656, Blount [as "acersecomick"]
  • 1888, NED Volume 1 (also in OED2, OED3 draft)
0
acetars (acetarr, acetaries) noun from Latin acetaria salad with vinegar
  • 1623, Cockeram [as "acetarr"]
  • 1656, Blount [as "acetar"]
  • 1663, Bullokar
  • 1751, Bailey
  • 1775, Ash
  • 1775, Denning
  • 1888, NED Volume 1 (also in OED2, OED3 draft, as "acetar")
0
acyrological adjective acyrology + -ical exhibiting improper speech
  • 1623, Cockeram [as noun]
  • 1888, NED Volume 1 (also in OED2, OED3 draft)
0
adact verb from Latin adactus, past participle of adigo drive by force
  • 1851?, Imperial
  • 1888, NED Volume 1 (also in OED2, OED3 draft)
  • 1890, Century
1
adacted adjective from Latin adactus driven (in) by force
  • 1623, Cockeram
  • 1658, Phillips
  • 1676, Coles
  • 1755, Johnson[4]
  • 1797, Walker
  • 1810, Duane
  • 1826, James
  • 1888, NED Volume 1 (also in OED2, OED3 draft)
0
adenochirapsology noun (medicine) The doctrine of the curative capacity of the "royal touch". An Illustrated Dictionary of Medicine, Biology, and Allied Sciences. George M. Gould (1894). 1
addecimate verb from Latin addecimo to take as a tithe
  • 1623, Cockeram
  • 1658, Phillips
  • 1676, Coles
  • 1755, Johnson
  • 1828, Webster
  • 1888, NED Volume 1 (also in OED2, OED3 draft)
1
adiaphoracy (adiaphoricie) noun from Ancient Greek ἀδιαφορία indifference
  • 1623, Cockeram [as "adiaphoricie"]
  • 1847, Craig
  • 1888, NED Volume 1 (also in OED2, OED3 draft)
0
aerumnous (ærumnous) adjective from Latin aerumnosus, from aerumna full of trouble
  • 1658, Phillips
  • 1676, Coles
  • 1721, Bailey
  • 1888, NED Volume 1 (also in OED2, OED3 draft)
0
agnœa noun from Antient Greek ἄγνοια State of a patient who does not recognize individuals or other things.
  • 1895, A Dictionary of Medical Science
  • 1911, The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
0
anadesm (anadesme) noun from Ancient Greek ἀναδέσμη a band to tie up wounds
  • 1658, Phillips [as "anadesme"]
  • 1676, Coles
  • 1742, Bailey
  • 1846, Halliwell
  • 1888, NED Volume 1 (also in OED2, OED3 draft)
1
anepronym noun blend of anacronym + eponym a genericized trademark (several online word lists) 0
animadversiveness noun animadversive + -ness the state or quality of being animadversive; animadversion
  • 1731, Bailey
  • 1888, NED Volume 1 (also in OED2, OED3 draft)
0
anteloquy noun from Latin anteloquium 1. an actor's cue 2. a preface
  • 1623, Cockeram [as "antiloquy"; actor's sense only]
  • 1656, Blount
  • 1676, Coles
  • 1888, NED Volume 1 (also in OED2, OED3 draft)
2
antilœmic noun ἀντί- with λοιμικός Remedy utilised in prevention and curing of plagues.
  • 1911, The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
0
apophoret noun from Latin apophoretum a New Year's gift
  • 1623, Cockeram [as "apopheret"]
  • 1676, Bullokar
  • 1888, NED Volume 1 (also in OED2, OED3 draft)
0
applumbature noun from Latin applumbatura a joining or soldering with lead
  • 1656, Blount
  • 1676, Coles
  • 1888, NED Volume 1 (also in OED2, OED3 draft)
0
aretaloger noun from Latin aretalogus one who brags of his own virtue
  • 1656, Blount
  • 1676, Coles
  • 1888, NED Volume 1 (also in OED2, OED3 draft)
0
argentanginy (argentageny) noun from Latin argentangina being bribed to hold one's tongue
  • 1623, Cockeram [as "argentageny"]
  • 1656, Blount
  • 1676, Coles
  • 1888, NED Volume 1 (also in OED2, OED3 draft)
0
argumentose adjective from the Latin argumentōsus Full of argument, reason, matter or proof; pithy, full of wit or skill.
  • 1731, Bailey (An universal etymological English dictionary)
  • 1888, NED Volume 1 (also in OED2)
0
assertionate noun assertion + -ate to assert
  • 1623, Cockeram
  • 1888, NED Volume 1 (also in OED2, OED3 draft)
1
assertionation noun assertionate + -ion an act of asserting or avowing
  • 1623, Cockeram
  • 1888, NED Volume 1 (also in OED2, OED3 draft)
0
assestrix noun from Latin a female assistant
  • 1623, Cockeram
  • 1888, NED Volume 1 (also in OED2, OED3 draft)
0
autocratship noun autocrat + -ship the state of being an autocrat
  • 1864, Webster
  • 1888, NED Volume 1 (also in OED2, OED3 draft)
2

BEdit

word part of speech etymology definition dictionaries including this word uses[1]
basiate[5] verb from Latin basiatus to kiss
  • 1623, Cockeram
  • 1888, NED Volume 1
1
bellaries noun from Latin bellaria banqueting dishes
  • 1623, Cockeram
  • 1888, NED Volume 1
0
bellitude noun from Latin bellitudo beauty
  • 1623, Cockeram
  • 1656, Blount
  • 1676, Coles
  • 1846, Halliwell
  • 1888, NED Volume 1
0
blandiloquy noun from Latin blandiloquium flattering speech
  • 1623, Cockeram
  • 1699, Coles
  • 1783, Bailey
  • 1888, NED Volume 1
1
brochity noun from Latin brocchitas crookedness, especially of the teeth
  • 1623, Cockeram
  • 1656, Blount
  • 1658, Phillips
  • 1676, Coles
  • 1724, Bailey
  • 1846, Halliwell
  • 1888, NED Volume 1
0
bubulcitate verb from Latin bubulcitare, from bubulcus 1. to cry like a cowherd. 2. to play the cowherd
  • 1623, Cockeram ["cry" sense only]
  • 1656, Blount
  • 1676, Coles ["play" sense only]
  • 1678, Phillips ["play" sense only, as an "affected word"]
  • 1888, NED Volume 1
0
buze noun from French buse a pipe used to draw air into a mine
  • 1823, Crabb
  • 1881 ed., Worcester
  • 1888, NED Volume 1
1

CEdit

word part of speech etymology definition dictionaries including this word uses[1]
calamist noun calamus + -ist Someone who plays a reed
  • 1623, Cockeram [as "one having his hair turned upward"]
  • 1656, Blount
  • 1678, Phillips
  • 1893, NED Volume 2
1
castaldick (castaldy) noun from Latin castaldicum office of a steward
  • 1678 ed., Phillips
  • 1721, Bailey
  • 1893, NED Volume 2
0
celeripedean noun from Latin celeripes + -ean a swift runner
  • 1623, Cockeram
  • 1656, Blount [as adjective]
  • 1676, Coles [as adjective]
  • 1893, NED Volume 2
1 dubious
cepivorous (cepevorous) adjective from Latin cepa + -vorous eating onions
  • 1864, Webster [as "cepevorous"]
  • 1890, Century [as "cepevorous"]
  • 1893, NED Volume 2 [labeled as "nonce word"]
  • 1913, Webster's [as "cepevorous"]
  • 1955, Shipley
1, 1
cespitate verb from Latin cespito to stumble
  • 1623, Cockeram
  • 1658, Phillips
  • 1676, Coles
  • 1893, NED Volume 2
0
chrysostomatical (chrisostomaticall, chrysostomaticall) adjective chryso- + stomatic + -al eloquent
  • 1623, Cockeram [as "chrisostomaticall"]
  • 1893, NED Volume 2
  • 1955, Shipley
1
conspuated adjective having spots
  • 1623, Cockeram
  • 1893, NED Volume 2
0
consomniate verb from Latin consomniāre to dream
  • 1623, Cockeram (as "consomnat")
  • 1893, NED Volume 2
0
corymbiate adjective from Latin corymbiatus having the form of a corymb; corymbiated
  • 1882 ed., Imperial
  • 1890, Century
  • 1893, NED Volume 2
1
cotigulate verb probable error for contegulate to tile a house
  • 1623, Cockeram
  • 1893, NED Volume 2
0
crepane noun error for crepance a scratch in a horse's leg
  • 1755, Johnson
  • 1828, Webster
  • 2008, OED3 draft [mentioned in citations in NED]
0
cucubate verb from Latin cucubo to hoot like an owl
  • 1623, Cockeram
  • 1656, Blount
  • 1717 ed., Coles
  • 1893, NED Volume 2
0
cucuriate verb from Latin cucurio to crow
  • 1623, Cockeram
  • 1893, NED Volume 2
0

DEdit

word part of speech etymology definition dictionaries including this word uses[1]
debacchate verb from Latin debacchor to rave like a bacchante
  • 1623, Cockeram
  • 1897, NED Volume 3
  • 1913, Webster's Revised
0
dord noun contraction of "D or d" density
  • 1934, Webster’s New International Dictionary (including later printings until 1947)[6]
0

EEdit

word part of speech etymology definition dictionaries including this word uses[1]
eblandish verb From Latin eblandior To get by coaxing.
  • 1623, Cockeram
  • 1897, NED Volume 3
0
epicœmasis noun From Ancient Greek Position or process of sleeping.
  • 1895, A dictionary of medical science
0
esquivalience noun N/A the shirking of one's official responsibilities
  • 2001, New Oxford American Dictionary (as a copyright trap)
  • Unknown date–2005, Dictionary.com
0
etæristria noun From Ancient Greek Female considered a hermaphrodite because of her large clitoris size.
  • 1895, A dictionary of medical science
0
euneirophrenia noun The peaceful state of mind after a pleasant dream
  • 2014, ElderSpeak: A Thesaurus or Compendium of Words Related to Old Age
1
exumbilication noun ex- + umbilication a pronounced protrusion of the navel
  • 1676, Bailey
  • 1707, Blount
  • 1849, Craig
  • 1919, American Illustrated Medical Dictionary
1

FEdit

word part of speech etymology definition dictionaries including this word uses[1]
fideicide noun Latin fidei + -cide a destroyer of trust
  • 1656, Glossographia (Blount)
  • 1676, An English Dictionary (Coles)
  • 1900, New English Dictionary volume 4 (also in OED2, OED3 draft)
0

GEdit

word part of speech etymology definition dictionaries including this word uses[1]
gaincope verb From the Middle English geynecowpen. To get over or go across the nearest way to meet. 1
gausapine noun From the Latin gausapina. A jerkin of frieze.
  • 1623, Cockeram
  • 1900, NED Volume 4
0

HEdit

word part of speech etymology definition dictionaries including this word uses[1]
helluation (also heluation) noun gluttony
  • 1656, Glossographia (Blount)
  • 1901, New English Dictionary, Volume 5 (also in OED2, OED3 draft)
1
homodoxian noun homodox + ian one who has the same opinion as another
  • 1901, New English Dictionary, Volume 5 [as subentry under homodox]
1
hypnopœus uncountable noun hypno- + -poeus producing sleep
  • 1895, A Dictionary of Medical Science
0

IEdit

word part of speech etymology definition dictionaries including this word uses[1]
inorthography uncountable noun From in- + orthography incorrect spelling 1
intribution noun From intribūtiōn-, the stem of the Latin intribūtiō. contribution or lot-money paid for lands 0
invision noun in- + vision blindness 0
irroborate verb From Latin ir- + roborare to make strong
  • 1623, Cockeram
  • 1656, Blount
  • 1676, Coles
  • 1901, NED Volume 5
0

JEdit

word part of speech etymology definition dictionaries including this word uses[1]
jejunation noun From Latin jejunatio fasting
  • 1623, Cockeram
  • 1658, Phillips
  • 1901, NED Volume 5
1

KEdit

word part of speech etymology definition dictionaries including this word uses[1]
knapple (1) verb frequentative of knap to break off with a sharp, quick noise
  • 1755, Johnson
  • 1890, Century
  • 1901, NED Volume 5
0
knapple (2) verb frequentative of knap to nibble
  • 1611, Cotgrave [in gloss, as "knaple"]
  • 1847, Halliwell
  • 1890, Century
  • 1901, NED Volume 5
0

LEdit

word part of speech etymology definition dictionaries including this word uses[1]
languifical adjective causing languor
  • 1656, Glossographia (Blount)
  • 1724, Universal Etymological English Dictionary (Bailey)
  • 1908, New English Dictionary, Volume 6 (also in OED2, OED3 draft)
0
lœmicum adjective From Ancient Greek Pertaining to the plague.
  • 1895, A dictionary of medical science
0
lœmocomium noun From Ancient Greek Hospital for those affected with plague.
  • 1895, A dictionary of medical science
0
lœmology noun From Ancient Greek λοιμός with -λογία. Doctrine of plague and pestilential diseases.
  • 1895, A dictionary of medical science
0
lœmopyra noun From Ancient Greek λοιμός with πῦρ. Fever of contagious character; plague.
  • 1895, A dictionary of medical science
0
loimography (lœmography) noun From Ancient Greek λοιμός with -γραφία. Description of a plague and pestilential diseases.
  • 1895, A dictionary of medical science
0

MEdit

word part of speech etymology definition dictionaries including this word uses[1]
macellarious adjective pertaining to a butchers' row
  • 1656, Glossographia (Blount)
  • 1676, An English Dictionary (Coles)
  • 1908, New English Dictionary, Volume 6 (also in OED2, OED3 draft)
0
mactator[7] noun murderer
  • 1656, Glossographia (Blount)
  • 1890, Century Dictionary
  • 1908, New English Dictionary, Volume 6 (also in OED2, OED3 draft)
1
madidate verb to wet
  • 1656, Glossographia (Blount)
  • 1676, An English Dictionary (Coles)
  • 1908, New English Dictionary, Volume 6 (also in OED2, OED3 draft)
0
madidity noun wetness
  • 1656, Glossographia (Blount)
  • 1908, New English Dictionary, Volume 6 (also in OED2, OED3 draft)
0
magirist noun An expert cook
  • OED2, OED3 draft
1
mammeated adjective mammate
  • 1656, Blount
  • 1724, Bailey
  • 1890, Century
  • 1908, NED, Volume 6 (also in OED2, OED3 draft)
0
manticulate verb From Latin manticulari to pickpocket, or do something stealthily
  • 1656, Blount
  • 1676, Cole
  • 1724, Bailey
  • 1891, Black
  • 1908, NED, Volume 6 (also in OED2, OED3 draft)
0
manticulation noun From Latin manticulari deceitful conveyance
  • 1623, Cockeram
  • 1908, NED, Volume 6 (also in OED2, OED3 draft)
0
marcescible adjective From Latin marcescibilis apt to rot
  • 1656, Blount
  • 1775, Walker
  • 1890, Century
  • 1908, NED, Volume 6 (also in OED2, OED3 draft)
  • 1913, Webster's
1
marcidious adjective marcid+ -ious rotten, withered or feeble
  • 1656, Blount
  • 1775, Ash
  • 1908, NED, Volume 6 (also in OED2, OED3 draft)
0
marginean adjective margin + -ean of the margin
  • 1656, Blount
  • 1908, NED, Volume 6 (also in OED2, OED3 draft)
0
mastigophorer noun From Ancient Greek μαστιγοφόρος someone who deserves to be whipped
  • 1656, Blount
  • 1908, NED, Volume 6 (also in OED2, OED3 draft)
1
matricious noun Latin matrix + -ious of or pertaining to the womb
  • 1656, Blount [as "matricious vein"]
  • 1908, NED, Volume 6 (also in OED2, OED3 draft)
1
mechation noun From Latin moechari + -tion fornication
  • 1656, Blount
  • 1724, Bailey
  • 1908, NED, Volume 6 (also in OED2, OED3 draft)
0
meganology noun mega- + -n- + -ology a speech of magnitude or greatness
  • 1656, Blount [as "meganologie"]
  • 1908, NED, Volume 6 (also in OED2, OED3 draft)
0
mœrology noun From Ancient Greek: μοῖρα (moîra, fate) in combination with -λογία (-logía) Artistic practice of professional mourning.
  • 1911, The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
0
murated adjective From Latin mūrātus Having walls; walled.
  • 1727, Bailey
  • 1908-2003, NED/OED
1

NEdit

word part of speech etymology definition dictionaries including this word uses[1]
naucify verb From Latin nauci facere to disesteem
  • 1656, Blount
  • 1908, NED Volume 6
0
nixious adjective From Latin nix as white as snow
  • 1623, Henry Cockeram
0

OEdit

word part of speech etymology definition dictionaries including this word uses[1]
obacerate (obaceration) verb from Latin obacerāre (to contradict) To stop someone’s mouth, before they can finish speaking.
  • 1656, Blount
  • 1658, Phillips ("obaceration")
  • 1676, Coles
  • 1909, NED Volume 7
0
obserate verb From Latin obseratus. To lock up.
  • 1911, The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
0
oppicate (oppication) verb from Latin oppicāre to cover with pitch
  • 1623, Cockeram
  • 1656, Blount ("oppication")
  • 1909, NED Volume 7
0
orniscopist noun orniscopy + -ist an auspex; someone who tells the future by examining the flight of birds
  • 1755, Johnson
  • 1775, Ash
  • 1828, Webster
  • 1909, NED Volume 7 (as dictionary word)
0
ossifragant adjective from Latin ossifragus + -ant bone-breaking
  • 1656, Blount
  • 1909, NED Volume 7
0
ostentiferous adjective from Latin Latin ostentifer bringing monsters or strange sights
  • 1656, Blount
  • 1676, Coles
  • 1909, NED Volume 7
1

PEdit

word part of speech etymology definition dictionaries including this word uses[1]
parachronize verb from para- + chron- + -ize to mistime
  • 1670, Blount (3rd ed.)
  • 1676, Coles
  • 1890, Century
  • 1909, NED Volume 7
0
pastoritious adjective from Latin pastōritīus of or pertaining to a shepherd
  • 1656, Blount
  • 1909, NED Volume 7
0
pecuarious adjective from Latin pecuārius of or pertaining to cattle
  • 1656, Blount
  • 1658, Phillips
  • 1676, Coles
  • 1909, NED Volume 7
0
periclitancy noun from Latin periclitatio an adventuring or putting at risk
  • 1656, Blount
  • 1909, NED Volume 7
0
perreptation noun from Latin perreptatio a creeping through
  • 1656, Blount
  • 1676, Coles
  • 1909, NED Volume 7
0
phocænine adjective from the scientific Latin Phocaena, from the Ancient Greek φώκαινα (phṓkaina, porpoise), from φώκη (phṓkē, seal) of, relating to, or resembling a porpoise
  • 1890, Cent. Dict.
  • 1909, NED VII; 1989, OED 2; 2006/iii, OED 3
0
phthongometer noun Ancient Greek φθόγγος (phthóngos, voice) + -meter An instrument for measuring vocal sounds.
  • 1913, Webster
0
posterganeous adjective from Latin posterganeus of or pertaining to the posterior
  • 1656, Blount
  • 1909, NED Volume 7
0
postliminiage noun from Latin postliminium + -age postliminy, the return of someone thought dead
  • 1662, Blount (2nd ed.)
  • 1909, NED Volume 7
  • 1955, Shipley
0
pransorious adjective from Latin pransorius of or pertaining to dinner
  • 1656, Blount
  • 1676, Coles
  • 1909, NED Volume 7
0
protense noun from (stem of) Latin prōtendere protension
  • 2007, OED3
1
pultifical adjective from Latin pultificus serving to make pottage or pap
  • 1656, Blount
  • 1676, Coles
  • 1909, NED Volume 7
0
pygmachy noun From Ancient Greek πυγμαχία (pugmakhía) fighting with clubs or bats
  • 1656, Blount
  • 1658, Phillips
  • 1676, Coles
  • 1909, NED Volume 7 [defined as "boxing"]
0

QEdit

word part of speech etymology definition dictionaries including this word uses[1]
quadrigarious adjective from Latin quadrigarius of or pertaining to a four-horsed coach or its coachman
  • 1656, Blount
  • 1658, Phillips
  • 1676, Coles
  • 1914, NED Volume 8
0
quadringenarious adjective from Latin quadringenarius of or containing four hundred
  • 1656, Blount
  • 1658, Phillips
  • 1676, Coles
  • 1914, NED Volume 8
0
querculane adjective from Latin querculanus made of oak
  • 1656, Blount
  • 1914, NED Volume 8
0
quingenarious adjective from Latin quingenarius of or containing five hundred
  • 1656, Blount
  • 1658, Phillips
  • 1676, Coles
  • 1914, NED Volume 8
0

REdit

word part of speech etymology definition dictionaries including this word uses[1]
redamancy noun mutual love; the act of loving in return (despite his lack of redamancy her passion for him was unabated for several years)
  • 1656, Glossographia (Blount)
  • 1914, New English Dictionary, Volume 8 (also in OED2, OED3 draft)
0
redamation noun mutual love
  • 1656, Glossographia (Blount)
  • 1914, New English Dictionary, Volume 8 (also in OED2, OED3 draft)
1

SEdit

word part of speech etymology definition dictionaries including this word uses[1]
salsamentarious adjective Latin salsamentarius salty
  • 1755, Johnson
1
self-uned adjective self + Latin unus one (obsolete, nonce) one with itself; separate from others
  • 1913, Webster
2
snilch verb (slang) to eye (someone or something)
  • 1676, Coles
  • c. 1698, Canting Crew
  • 1919, NED, Volume 9 (also in OED2, OED3 draft)
0

TEdit

word part of speech etymology definition dictionaries including this word uses[1]
terebinthinism noun Greek τερεβινθίνη poisoning by turpentine
  • The American Illustrated Medical Dictionary, 1916
  • A dictionary of new medical terms, 1905
0
thelitis noun From New Latin, from Ancient Greek θηλη (thēlē, nipple) + -itis (inflammation). a condition of an inflamed nipple 0
transfume verb From Latin transfumare to smoke through
  • 1623, Cockeram
  • 1656, Blount
  • 1676, Coles
  • 1795, Ash
  • 1926, NED Volume 10 Part 1
1
typhlobasia noun Ancient Greek τυφλός (tuphlós, blind) + Latin bāsi- (stem of bāsiō (I kiss) and its derivation bāsium (a kiss)) + English -ia (suffix forming abstract nouns) the act of kissing with one’s eyes closed 0

UEdit

word part of speech etymology definition dictionaries including this word uses[1]
uberate verb From Latin uberare to make plentiful, or nourish
  • 1623, Cockeram [as "Huberate"]
  • 1656, Blount
  • 1926, NED Volume 10 Part 1
0

VEdit

word part of speech etymology definition dictionaries including this word uses[1]
vendication noun vendicate+ -ion a claiming for oneself
  • 1658, Phillips
  • 1928, NED Volume 10 Part 2
0
villicated adjective from Latin villicatus busy with husbandry
  • 1623, Cockeram
  • 1928, NED Volume 10 Part 2
0

W–ZEdit

word part of speech etymology definition dictionaries including this word uses[1]
zelotypy noun From Latin zelotypia jealousy
  • 1731, Bailey (An universal etymological English dictionary)
0
zygostat noun From Latin zygostates a market clerk who oversees weights
  • 1623, Cockeram
  • 1928, NED Volume 10
1
zygostatical adjective From zygostat + -ical pertaining to a market clerk who oversees weights
  • 1656, Blount
  • 1928, NED Volume 10
0
zzxjoanw noun Began as a joke (or hoax?). Maori: “drum”, “fife”, “conclusion”
  • 1903, The Musical Guide (Rupert Hughes), page 307
0

NotesEdit

  1. 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 1.11 1.12 1.13 1.14 1.15 1.16 1.17 1.18 1.19 1.20 1.21 1.22 Limited to uses (not mentionings) that are recorded in a durably-archived medium such as print, in accordance with the English Wiktionary’s fourth criterion for inclusion.
  2. ^ ablocate: These two uses bear no resemblance to the proffered sense, or to each other.
  3. ^ acerote: The NED speculates this originated as a typo for acerose, "chaffy".
  4. ^ Some later editions of Johnson add that "the verb adact is not used."
  5. ^ basiate: basiation is well attested.
  6. ^ [1]
  7. ^ mactator: also a species epithet

Key to dictionariesEdit

See alsoEdit