Last modified on 12 July 2014, at 17:08

Arbeit macht frei

GermanEdit

German Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia de

EtymologyEdit

Arbeit (work) + macht (makes) + frei (free). The phrase has been used since at least the early 1800s, and appears for example in Heinrich Beta's 1845 Geld und Geist. How the national socialists came to have an affinity for the phrase is unclear; it may have been a reference to concentration camps' ostensible purpose as work camps. Harold Marcuse attributes the decision to use it over concentration camp gates to Theodor Eicke.

ProverbEdit

Arbeit macht frei

  1. Work makes you free; work brings freedom.
    • 1845, Heinrich Beta, Geld und Geist:
      Nicht der Glaube macht selig, nicht der Glaube an egoistische Pfaffen- und Adelzwecke, sondern die Arbeit macht selig, denn die Arbeit macht frei. Das ist nicht protestantisch oder katholisch, oder deutsch- oder christkatholisch, nicht liberal oder servil, das ist das allgemein menschliche Gesetz und die Grundbedingung alles Lebens und Strebens, alles Glückes und aller Seligkeit.

Usage notesEdit

The National Socialists set this phrase over the gates of several major concentration camps, for which reason it is only rarely used today.

ReferencesEdit