Black Book

EnglishEdit

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NounEdit

Black Book (plural Black Books)

  1. Any of several books or documents of a political character, published at different times and for different purposes; so called either from the colour of the binding, or from the character of the contents.
    1. A book compiled in the twelfth century, containing a description of the court of exchequer of England, an official statement of the revenues of the crown, etc.
    2. A book containing details of the enormities practiced in the English monasteries and religious houses, compiled by order of their visitors under Henry VIII, to hasten their dissolution.
    3. A book of admiralty law, of the highest authority, compiled in the reign of Edward III.
    4. A book kept for the purpose of registering the names of persons liable to censure or punishment, as in the English universities, or the English armies.
    5. Any book dealing with necromancy.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.

See alsoEdit

Last modified on 9 November 2012, at 22:20