Citations:brandwidth

English citations of brandwidth

1999 2001 2002 2003 2004 2006 2007 2008 2010
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  • 1999 — Susan Kuchinskas, "IQ News: Consumers Know Beenz", Adweek, 17 May 1999:
    The New York-based Romann Group, which touts its trademarked "brandwidth" online awareness focus, designed the logo and three ads targeting both consumers and trade with copy such as "attention, greedy bastards."
  • 2001 — Rachel Konrad, "Automakers steer cars toward connectivity", CNET News, 7 January 2001:
    And, putting a new spin on the New Economy buzzword "bandwidth," Nasser said that Ford is in a unique position to connect customers--be they patrons of Ford's upscale Jaguar division, yuppie parents who drive Volvos, farmers who favor F150 pickups, or nostalgic aficionados of the redesigned Ford Thunderbird.
    "We can leverage our significant brandwidth," Nasser said.
  • 2002 — "A new brand world", Brand Strategy, 1 April 2002:
    Whenever a company attempts to broaden its brand -- for increased revenues or for profits -- it should always be diligent about assessing the impact that additional "brandwidth" will have on its brand strength.
  • 2003 — "India C&S industry revenues to hit $11b by 2015: report", Indiantelevision.com, 3 January 2003:
    At the same time, positive trends in deregulation should take concrete shape in key markets with strategic and financial investment likely to increase as regulatory caps are lifted and concerns over pay TV's infrastructure-heavy and bandwidth-focused past, are replaced by positive sentiment on its consumer-led and brandwidth-focused future.
  • 2003 — Shirley Brady, "John Ford Lands at Nat Geo, McGowan Launching a Shop", CableFAX Magazine, 21 July 2003:
    His first goal at the joint venture between National Geographic Television & Film and Fox Cable Networks is to tackle prime time. “We need to use more of the brand bandwidth that we have — the brandwidth, if you will — to draw in a wider, more diverse audience, and improve the ratings. {{..}}
  • 2004 — Annys Shin, "Channeling a New Wave of Viewers", Washington Post, 12 July 2004:
    Schiffman and John Ford, the channel's executive vice president for programming, in turn, are expanding the National Geographic "brandwidth" to suit New Enthusiasts' tastes.
  • 2004 — Richard Clarke, "A website for a daily newspaper offers possibilities for extending reader target markets", BizCommunity.com, 26 September 2004:
    A possible method of utilising the website to gain more 'brandwidth' is to add articles to the site that did not make the print edition because they were aimed at too narrow a technology or business reader segment.
  • 2006 — Rae Hoffman, "Rebranding Ask.com", Search Engine Watch, 2 October 2006:
    The butler part of the brand was strongly associated with "the web site where you can search by asking questions." The range of products and experiences we now provide is far beyond that and will keep expanding--we needed to free up the "brandwidth" to allow current and new users to see what we've become and consider us as we evolve.
  • 2007 — Laurie Petersen, "Never Heard of Minyanville? Soon You Will", Online Media Daily, 19 July 2007:
    Now officially onboard to exploit Minyanville's "brandwidth" as chief marketing officer is Charles Mangano, the former worldwide brand head who established Merrill Lynch and its bull as a leading global brand.
  • 2008 — Anne Becker, "Cable Flexes Its Muscles", Broadcasting & Cable, 27 April 2008:
    Most of all, cable networks continue to pitch their strong brands. USA's upfront message was about the network’s "brandwidth," contending that the "Characters Welcome" slogan resonates with viewers, said USA/Sci Fi president Bonnie Hammer.
  • 2010 — Keira Lopez, "L.A. Auto Show: ALL-NEW Ford Focus Makes North American Debut with Projected 40 MPG", IEWY News, 19 November 2010:
    "One of every four new vehicles sold in the world today comes from this small car segment, which we anticipate will see further growth in North America," said Jim Hughes, chief engineer. "We're aiming to stretch Focus’ 'brandwidth' by adding a premium Titanium series with luxury levels of convenience and comfort, appealing to an ever-expanding spectrum of buyers."
Last modified on 20 January 2012, at 10:09