Last modified on 30 September 2014, at 13:41

Rachel

See also: Rachêl

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Via Late Latin, from Ancient Greek Ῥαχήλ (Rhakhḗl), from Hebrew רָחֵל, "ewe"

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Rachel

  1. Younger daughter of Laban, sister to Leah, and second wife of Jacob.
    • 1611, King James Version of the Bible (Authorized Version), Genesis 29:16-17
      And Laban had two daughters: the name of the elder was Leah, and the name of the younger was Rachel. Leah was tender eyed; but Rachel was beautiful and well favoured. And Jacob loved Rachel; and said, I will serve thee seven years for Rachel thy younger daughter.
  2. A female given name.
    • 1849 The Massachusetts Teacher, Massachusetts Teachers' Association, Vol. 2,page 26, January 1849:
      Rachel is another modest, nun-like name, of the same order as Judith, and has the appropriate signification of a lamb.
    • 1979 Doris Lessing, Shikasta, Knopf, 1979, ISBN 0394507321, page 293
      She keeps saying, You are mistaken Rachel. She says my name in that heavy earnest way. The Jewish Ra-chel. I like my name like that. I have always been pleased when people said Ra-chel. But when she says it, it is as if she was taking me over. Through my name.
    • 2010 Rob Sachs, What Would Rob Do?, John Wiley & Sons, ISBN 0470457732:
      I recognize that a name like Rachel goes against my whole "ordering a different dish from everyone else at the table" rule, but sometimes you really want a steak, and that's exactly what you should get. I love the name we gave our daughter. It's not dorky, not too whimsical, and not too stuck-up. To us it sounded sweet, sporty, smart, and beautiful. It also works well with Sachs.

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

Proper nounEdit

Rachel

  1. Rachel (biblical figure)
  2. A female given name.

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

Proper nounEdit

Rachel

  1. Rachel (biblical figure)
  2. A female given name.