Last modified on 6 June 2014, at 07:12

Sieg Heil

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From German Sieg (victory) + Heil (hail), a common chant at political rallies in Nazi Germany, meaning roughly "Hail Victory!"

PhraseEdit

Sieg Heil

  1. The greeting Sieg Heil, used in the Third Reich during the Nazi era and by neo-Nazis today.
    • 1971, Sydney Morrell, Spheres of Influence", page 216
      "Ti-to! Ti-to! Ti-to!" has exactly the same rhythm and resonance as "Sieg Heil! Sieg Heil! Sieg Heil!" at the Nazi demonstrations, or "Du-ce! Du-ce! Du-ce!" in Fascist Italy.
    • 1991, James Davison Hunter, Culture Wars: The Struggle to Define America, page 16
      All of a sudden a number of the militant homosexuals stood up, raised their hands in a Nazi-style salute and began to chant "Sieg heil! Sieg heil! Sieg heil!" Everyone in the room was paralyzed. How could they accuse us — those who suffered and died in the Holocaust — of being Nazis?
    • 1995, Terry H. Anderson, The Movement and The Sixties, page 224
      Tear gas floated into the Hilton, up the air vents, and into the suite of the vice president, who was preparing his acceptance speech. On the street, chanting: "Sieg Heil, Sieg Heil, Sieg Heil," and "The Whole World Is Watching." The world was watching, or at least an estimated 90 million Americans […].
    • 2002, John Rodden, Repainting the Little Red Schoolhouse: A History of Eastern German Education, page 202
      And so, sometimes, did their direct effects. At many skinhead concerts, bands led fans in swastika flag-waving and chants of Sieg Heil!
    • 2004, Paul Taylor, Jews and the Olympic Games: The Clash Between Sport and Politics, page 101
      Then a few voices started to chant "Sieg heil! Sieg heil!", and these were joined by more voices, and gradually the whole assembly rose to its feet.

TranslationsEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

PhraseEdit

Sieg Heil

  1. (archaic) A greeting; literally Hail, victory!

Usage notesEdit

Sieg Heil became the salute of the German National Socialist (Nazi) party in the 1920s. It developed to the so called Hitler salute, the use of which was later made obligatory to all Germans in the Third Reich. After WWII, the public use of any form of the Hitler salute was criminalized in Germany and Austria. In Germany it is punishable with up to three years in prison.

See alsoEdit