Last modified on 18 July 2011, at 17:17

Stepford

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Proper nounEdit

Stepford

  1. A surname.
  2. A place name.

Etymology 2Edit

A fictional place name.
After the fictional suburb in the 1972 novel The Stepford Wives by Ira Levin, and in two films of the same name based on the novel.

AdjectiveEdit

Stepford (not comparable)

  1. Docile, unthinking and conformist.
    • 1999, Mary Higgins Clark, We'll Meet Again, page 131,
      “He called you a boring Stepford wife.”
      A boring Stepford wife, Molly thought. For a moment it seemed to her that she was once more in prison, eating the tasteless food, hearing the click of locks, lying awake for sleepless night after sleepless night.
    • 2008, Karin Tabke, Have Yourself a Naughty Little Santa, page 150,
      So, when in a dorky Christmas town with Stepford people and themed shops, do as they do. Smile and act like you gave two shits about the person next to you.
    • 2011 July 18, Matt Culkin, “[The 16 Most Hilariously Dishonest Old School Advertisements”, Cracked.com:
      Were the Nazis trying to infiltrate the U.S. Navy with an army of gonorrhea-infected Stepford clones?
  2. Attractive but lacking any character.

ReferencesEdit

  • OED 2004