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Talk:broken arrow

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[1] broken arrow: serviceman who tried to be a straight arrow and failed.

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# (Olde English) A captured archer (who had subsequently been released or escaped) and had had his drawing fingers removed thus preventing his ability to shoot arrows, and hence was "broken".  (Removal of the index finger and middle finger was a common punishment inflicted by the French on English archers throughout history, especially during medieval times.)
# (singular only) someone who has a low standard of behavior, a fallen angel, the opposite of a [[straight arrow]].

broken arrow

rfv'd sense: "(Olde English) A captured archer (who had subsequently been released or escaped) and had had his drawing fingers removed thus preventing his ability to shoot arrows, and hence was "broken". (Removal of the index finger and middle finger was a common punishment inflicted by the French on English archers throughout history, especially during medieval times."

Superficial plausibility reminds me of urban legends. No reference to this in g.b.c. or scholar. DCDuring 22:53, 11 November 2007 (UTC)

The practice of cutting these two fingers is the origin of the two finger salute or V-sign commonly used in UK as a vulgar gesture. (To demonstrate to the enemy that the two fingers are still intact). But I have never heard of it referred to as broken arrow. Algrif 12:36, 12 November 2007 (UTC)
Pretty sure that's a myth, actually. There was never a practice of cutting off archer's fingers. --Ptcamn 11:23, 13 November 2007 (UTC)
I read it in history books at school (15 years ago! so can't provide a reference sorry, though I'll try and pop in to the local library to see if I can get a reference). Anyway, this entry is stating that it is the archer with those fingers missing that was referred to as the "broken arrow" rather than making any claims about the act of removing of the fingers. --62.49.204.126 16:06, 13 November 2007 (UTC)
Being a myth doesn't mean that's not a legitimate definition. We don't remove the definition of unicorn simply because it's a myth. What matters is whether the term is used that way, not whether there is a factual basis behind the use. --EncycloPetey 18:48, 13 November 2007 (UTC)

sense not a straight arrow: so and so is a broken arrow Seinfeld script; if you are a broken arrow Usenet --66.167.41.146 03:46, 17 November 2007 (UTC)

Seinfeld linked above is a bad link, the usenet cite is good but lonely, rfvfailed for both senses. - TheDaveRoss 01:08, 13 April 2008 (UTC)