Talk:concept

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Hebrew translationEdit

In the Hebrew translations, I erased the words "רעיון" (Idea) and "הבנה" (understanding). Liso 13:56, 28 May 2007 (UTC)

DefinitionsEdit

Candidate definitions; building material for definitions
No. Definition Note
1. Something understood, and retained in the mind, from experience, reasoning and/or imagination; a generalization (generic, basic form), or abstraction (mental impression), of a particular set of instances or occurrences (specific, though different, recorded manifestations of the concept). Current in Wiktionary.
2. An abstract idea or a mental symbol, typically associated with a corresponding representation in a language or symbology. First one currently in Wikipedia.
3. A unit of knowledge built from characteristics. Second one currently in Wikipedia.
4. An abstract general conception; a notion; a universal. concept in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913
5. A general notion; the predicate of a (possible) judgment; a complex of characters; the immediate object of thought in simple apprehension. Conception is applied to both the act and the object in conceiving; concept is restricted to object. concept in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911

--Daniel Polansky 09:42, 30 June 2008 (UTC)

Identity of "Sir W. Hamilton"Edit

I estimate that the person quoted by Webster 1913 under the name "Sir W. Hamilton" is W:Sir William Hamilton, 9th Baronet, a Scottish metaphysician who has also written on logic. Another candidate is W:William Rowan Hamilton, an Irish mathematician, physicist, and astronomer. W. R. Hamilton is not a philosopher in the narrow sense, and would presumably be quoted as "Sir W. R. Hamilton. Still, the identification that I have performed remains an estimation, to be falsified if need be. See also W:William Hamilton, a list of all people with the name. --Daniel Polansky 10:09, 30 June 2008 (UTC)

Concept mean 'something understood'Edit

This can't be right can it? We don't use concept to mean "something understood," we use it for any old idea. Paul 89.242.106.40 11:21, 13 November 2008 (UTC)

Last modified on 2 February 2014, at 08:40