Last modified on 18 June 2009, at 16:50

Talk:hiatus

Return to "hiatus" page.

Does anyone think that maybe the plural of "hiatus" could be "hiatii"?

Just curious.

Definitely not. As the Etymology section tells you, hiatus is taken from the Latin word hiatus, which has hiatus as its nominative plural (indicated by the -us. See w:Latin declension#Fourth declension (u)). So, in English, you can choose between using the Latin plural or the anglicised plural hiatuses. Ncik 19:39, 31 December 2005 (UTC)

Is hiatus male, female, neutral or usual word without ''gender?

English words don't have genders. Jon Harald Søby 15:31, 17 January 2006 (UTC)
But this is a latin word... InitHello 14:13, 18 December 2007 (UTC)

Hey, how about adding a section on pronunciation in the entries? I have no idea how hiatus is pronounced.

hiatus pronunciationEdit

"high-ae-touss"

useEdit

can someone give me an example of the context in which 'hiatus' when referring to a 'break' or 'pause' may be used?

After putting the finishing touches on the software, he took a six month hiatus to go back to school.
--Connel MacKenzie T C 04:18, 9 June 2006 (UTC)
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hiatus

Rfv-sense: small difference in pitch between two musical tones. I can't find this definition in other dictionaries. When I google it, I only get references to Wikipedia and Wiktionary and their citations. Wikipedia's disambiguation page links to article "Interval music", but the article does not mention the word "hiatus". Might it be that Wikipedia has this wrong and everybody else is citing it? --Hekaheka 07:18, 4 February 2009 (UTC)

No defenders - proceeding to delete the sense. --Hekaheka 20:52, 5 March 2009 (UTC)
I've tried to avoid being at the same time prosecutor, judge, jury, and executioner. There is some musical sense to be found among these at Google Books. I would leave to someone with a clue. DCDuring TALK 23:16, 5 March 2009 (UTC)