Last modified on 21 June 2013, at 15:33

Talk:instance

Return to "instance" page.

Computing usageEdit

The trouble with the computing usage is twofold. One, even though it really does have a life of it's own, it is really just "a case occuring" in the specialized context of object oriented programming. The second is that the other computing definitions I've written elsewhere that use the word instance use it in it's "a case occuring" sense, not in the object-oriented sense. I'm afraid there's a danger that people who are looking at a computing related definition will think that they must use the computing sense of "instance", when really that sense is only with respect to object oriented programming. (You can also talk about an instance of a closure but I haven't written that definition into instance, and might not as it is, again, just "a case occuring".) --kop 17:30, 7 June 2006 (UTC)

RFVEdit

Keep tidy.svg

The following information has failed Wiktionary's verification process..

Failure to be verified may either mean that this information is fabricated, or is merely beyond our resources to confirm. We have archived here the disputed information, the verification discussion, and any documentation gathered so far, pending further evidence.
Do not re-add this information to the article without also submitting proof that it meets Wiktionary's criteria for inclusion. See also Wiktionary:Previously deleted entries.


Rfv-sense: "(computer science) A question that can be asked in the context of a computational problem." footnoted as follows Instances are questions that we can ask, and solutions are desired answers to these questions. See Models.

This looks as if someone took an attributive predication from an academic work and thought it constituted a definition (equative predication). DCDuring TALK 14:15, 28 August 2012 (UTC)

Never seen it. Would have expected to. Agree with your diagnosis. Equinox 22:26, 29 August 2012 (UTC)
RFV-failed. - -sche (discuss) 08:41, 23 October 2012 (UTC)