Last modified on 1 April 2012, at 04:09

Talk:priority

Return to "priority" page.

AdjectiveEdit

There was a problem in that section: "priority" was defined as a noun ("quality or state") and translated as a noun ("prioridad" in Spanish). Could someone check that the Finnish translation indeed corresponds to the adjective?

132.248.81.29 16:36, 24 August 2007 (UTC)

Problem is larger than that; it is a noun, not an adjective. Recently, it has been misused as an adjective (I can probably find an online dictionary to support the new adjective sense,) but the primary definition is still a noun. --Connel MacKenzie 17:22, 24 August 2007 (UTC)
I didn't think that it was non-standard to use a noun as an adjective. This link [1] suggests that it is orthodox usage. I'd certainly look for a better solution than using jargon in a sentence. If someone says: "This a priority project", you could consider it an elision of "This is a high-priority project." In both cases the noun is used as an adjective, correctly as far as I can tell. DCDuring 17:42, 30 August 2007 (UTC)

RFV 1Edit

TK archive icon.svg

The following discussion has been moved from Wiktionary:Requests for verification.

This discussion is no longer live and is left here as an archive. Please do not modify this conversation, though feel free to discuss its conclusions.


the "earlier in time" adjective sense. At best, that is redundant, as the event happens at an earlier time only as a by-product of having greater urgency. --Connel MacKenzie 17:29, 24 August 2007 (UTC)

Agreed. --EncycloPetey 20:00, 25 August 2007 (UTC)
I'm not sure I have heard it used that way as an adjective, but certainly I think as a noun the temporal sense is distinct from the sense of precedence of importance. Eg a scientist "claiming priority" for their research is not saying it is more important but that it came before other similar research. Widsith 14:34, 29 August 2007 (UTC)


RFV 2Edit

TK archive icon.svg

The following discussion has been moved from Wiktionary:Requests for verification.

This discussion is no longer live and is left here as an archive. Please do not modify this conversation, though feel free to discuss its conclusions.


One adjective sense was RFVed in 2007 and, for all intents and purposes, failed yet was not deleted. (See the talk page.) I am hereby requesting verification of any and all adjective senses. Please prove this isn't just a noun that is sometimes used attributively. - -sche (discuss) 23:13, 1 March 2012 (UTC)

RFV-failed. - -sche (discuss) 01:00, 27 March 2012 (UTC)