Last modified on 18 September 2012, at 11:55

Talk:proud

Return to "proud" page.

ArchiveEdit

TK archive icon.svg

The following discussion has been moved from Wiktionary:Requests for cleanup.

This discussion is no longer live and is left here as an archive. Please do not modify this conversation, though feel free to discuss its conclusions.


proud

I can't see how more than one sense is justified, here. Were they split up just to add the extra "quotations?" --Connel MacKenzie 19:15, 14 June 2007 (UTC)

Well, there is certainly another one besides the obvious one...e.g., proud flesh, which is swollen tissue around a healing sore. —Stephen 17:07, 16 June 2007 (UTC)
There is also both a positive and a negative sense pertainig to pride. Saying "We're proud of what you've done," carries a different sense from "The man was too proud to speak to me." The former is a sense of satisfaction and vicarious pleasure, whereas the latter carries a sense of haughtiness and disdain. Along with the sense Stephen has noted above, I'd say it looks like we have three definitions. --EncycloPetey 22:19, 17 June 2007 (UTC)
And what about "He's too proud to accept help when he needs it"? I don't think that really falls into either category. —RuakhTALK 01:51, 19 June 2007 (UTC)

I've reworked it fairly extensively. Also RFV-d one sense. Widsith 17:47, 18 July 2007 (UTC)


—This unsigned comment was added by Msh210 (talkcontribs) at 20:54, 8 January 2009‎.

SouthEdit

South of where? —This unsigned comment was added by 80.41.230.203 (talkcontribs) at 00:58, 22 March 2010‎.

First definitionEdit

"Having too high an opinion of oneself; arrogant, supercilious."

Do we have any evidence to back up this usage? I don't concur that the quote supports it. In "The lad was deathly proud!" it is the adjective deathly which modifies proud into "too proud". Pride itself merely means a high opinion. Not necessarily arrogance/superciliousness (too high). Unless there's some other usage of pride on its own without an adjective to alter the meaning, I think this meaning should be tagged to call its meaning into question. For example, "too tall" is negative, with setbacks, like being too tall to fit through a doorway, the usage "too tall" or "unhealthily heavy" etc do not serve to redefine an adjective's meaning because the phrase includes an additional adjective modifier in itself. Y12J (talk) 19:15, 21 March 2012 (UTC)

Other dictionaries have both a neutral and a pejorative sense of the meaning I'd summarize as "high self-esteem". DCDuring TALK 22:09, 12 April 2012 (UTC)

RFVEdit

Green check.svg

The following discussion has been moved from Wiktionary:Requests for verification.

Please do not re-nominate for verification without comprehensive reasons for doing so.


RFV-sense "Having too high an opinion of oneself; arrogant, supercilious." Tagged in this edit and discussed on the talk page, but not listed here. - -sche (discuss) 21:27, 12 April 2012 (UTC)

Other dictionaries have both a neutral and a pejorative sense of the meaning I'd summarize as "high self-esteem". DCDuring TALK 22:09, 12 April 2012 (UTC)
I've added a quote from the King James Bible. "proud" as a pejorative seems to be the default in that Bible. Smurrayinchester (talk) 08:07, 13 April 2012 (UTC)
RFV-passed. - -sche (discuss) 21:23, 7 June 2012 (UTC)


proud of vs. proud forEdit

what is the difference? Jackzhp (talk) 11:46, 18 September 2012 (UTC)

Need to see an example sentence. I don’t think that "proud for" is anything. That is, the word "for" probably does not belong to "proud", but to whatever word follows "for". —Stephen (Talk) 11:55, 18 September 2012 (UTC)