Last modified on 19 October 2014, at 23:27

Talk:purl

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EtymologyEdit

Hmmm, I realize now that I should not have removed the "1" in "Etymology 1." But I'm not going to restore it myself, because sources seem to show that there is no sound reason for separating etymologies 1-3 (though given the confusion, of course it is possible that there are separate etyma). 149.106.224.15 16:47, 3 February 2009 (UTC)

We will await more evidence. DCDuring TALK 00:58, 3 March 2009 (UTC)

NBEdit

A knitted stitch has two sides - a purl (wave) side and a knit (chevron) side. The action of knitting (looping a thread or yarn to make a fabric [from a single cord]) may be done to produce either side facing the knitter. The verb knit may be either generic, or specific. The verb purl is only specific to producing the purl side of stitches toward the knitter. All stitches produced by knitting or purling are knit stitches, however they are described as from the "right side" of the finished fabric where they will be either knits (chevrons) or purls (waves). The other use of "stitch" in knitting refers to a specific technique or sequence of stitches, e.g. a SSK "stitch" is a pattern of "slip two stitches, one at a time, knit-wise to the right needle, insert the left needle through the back of both stitches and knit the two together (resulting in a left-slanting decrease.)" This use expands to patterns of any number of stitches and rows which are repeated, e.g. feather and fan stitch, Twist-four mock cable stitch, Greek Key stitch, and so on. - Amgine/ t·e 23:27, 19 October 2014 (UTC)