Last modified on 25 May 2014, at 20:52

Ucalegon

EnglishEdit

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Latin Ucalegon, from Ancient Greek Οὐκαλέγων (Oukalégōn). He was one of the Elders of Troy, whose house was set on fire by the Achaeans when they sacked the city. He is one of Priam's friends in the Iliad (3.148) and the destruction of his house is referred to in the Aeneid (2.312).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

Ucalegon (plural Ucalegons)

  1. (dated) A neighbor whose house is on fire or has burned down.

QuotationsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek Οὐκαλέγων (Oukalégōn).

Proper nounEdit

Ucalegon m (genitive Ucalegōnis); third declension

  1. Ucalegon
    • 29 BCE – 19 BCE, Virgil, Aeneid 2.310
      Iam Deiphobi dedit ampla ruinam volcano superante domus, iam proximus ardet Ucalegon; Sigea igni freta lata relucent.
      The palace of Deiphobus ascends in smoky flames, and catches on his friends. Ucalegon burns next: the seas are bright.