Last modified on 14 January 2009, at 11:25

User:Robert Ullmann/t23

Missing Greek script in etymologies?


  • -ene From the {{etyl|el}} feminine patronymic.
  • -ia From the endings of corresponding {{etyl|la}} and {{etyl|grc}} plural nouns.
  • -id From {{etyl|el}} ''[[-idos]]''
  • -ine From [[Middle English]] ''-ine'', from [[Old French]] ''-ine'', from [[Latin]] ''[[-inus|-īnus]]'', from [[Greek]] ''[[-inos]]''.
  • -isc Cognate with German and Dutch '''[[-isch]]''', Scandinavian '''[[-sk]]''', Latin '''[[-icus]]''', Greek '''[[-ikos]]''', Slavic '''[[-ic]]''', '''[[-ich]]''', etc.
  • -ish From {{etyl|ang}} [[-isc]]. Cognate with German and Dutch ''[[-isch]]'', Latin ''[[-icus]]'', ''[[-isce]]'' and ''[[-ice]]'', Greek ''[[-ikos]]'', Slavic ''[[-ic]]'', ''[[-ich]]'', etc.
  • -isk Compare Danish ''[[-isk]]'', German and Dutch ''[[-isch]]'', Latin ''[[-icus]]'', ''[[-isce]]'' and ''[[-ice]]'', Greek ''[[-ikos]]'', Slavic ''[[-ic]]'', ''[[-ich]]'', etc.
  • -leptic {{etyl|el}} (leptos), ''[[seized]]''
  • -mere From Greek [[meros]].
  • -meter {{etyl|la}} [[metrum]] or {{etyl|el}} (metron), ''[[measure]]''
  • -metre {{etyl|la}} [[metrum]] or {{etyl|el}} (metron), ''[[measure]]''
  • -mycete From the [[Greek]] and [[Latin]] roots, ''-mycete'' basically means ''fungus''.
  • -o- From {{etyl|grc}}.
  • -orama {{back-form}} English [[panorama]] and [[cyclorama]], and thus from Greek [[horoma]], meaning sight, and ultimately Proto-Indo-European *wer-, meaning to perceive or look out for.
  • -pedia Greek ''paideia'' (py-dee-a) from the Greek pais, paidos: the upbringing of a child.
  • -phage {{etyl|grc}} (phagein), ''to [[eat]]''
  • -plasty Greek. -plastia, from plastos "molded, formed"
  • -pod {{etyl|el}}
  • -poeia {{etyl|la}} from {{etyl|el}} combining form ''[[making]]''
  • -scopy From {{etyl|grc}} {{term|skopein||to [[see]]}}.
  • -tron From a {{etyl|el}} instrumental suffix, used to name the [[electron]]
  • -trophy From {{etyl|el}} [[trophe]] "food, [[nourishment]]," from [[trephein]] "[[congeal]], [[thicken]]."
  • -èdre From {{etyl|el}} ''hedron''
  • abasiophilia From the Greek, abasios, meaning [[lameness]].
  • abracadabra [[magical|Magical]] word used in certain [[Gnostic]] writings, relation to [[Greek]] [[abraxas|Abraxas]], a Gnostic [[deity]]. It may also be a corruption of the Aramaic term {{lang|he|[[עַבְדָא כְּדַברָא]]}}, ''{{lang|he-Ltn|[[avda kedavra]]}}'', which means, "''what was said has been done''"; or perhaps, {{lang|he|,[[עברא כדברא]]}}, ''{{lang|he-Ltn|[[avra kedavra]]}}; "what has said has come to pass''." This may be the source of the ''Avada Kedavra'' killing curse in the ''Harry Potter'' books.
  • Achilles heel From Greek hero '''[[Achilles]]''', whom according to legend his mother held by the heel when she dipped him in the River Styx, making him invulnerable everywhere except on his heel. The legend of Achilles has it that he was dipped into the river Styx by his mother Thetis in order to make him invulnerable. His heel wasn't covered by the water and he was later killed by an arrow wound to his heel. Although the legend is ancient, the phrase wasn't picked up in English until the 19th century. It is used as a metaphor for vulnerability, as in the earliest citation, an essay by Samuel Taylor Coleridge in The Friend; a literary, moral and political weekly paper, 1810: "Ireland, that vulnerable heel of the British Achilles!"
  • acrogen {{etyl|el}} extreme, high + -gen
  • acroniem From {{etyl|el}}
  • acrophobia [[Greek]] [[acro-]] + [[phobia]]
  • acropoleis From {{etyl|el}} [[acro-]] ''[[tip]], [[peak]]'' + [[-poleis]] ''[[cities]]''.
  • acropolises From {{etyl|el}} [[acro-]] ''[[tip]], [[peak]]'' + [[-polis]] ''[[city]]'' + [[-es]] postsibilant pluralising suffix.
  • ad kalendas Graecas Attributed by [[w:Suetonius|Suetonius]] in ''[[w:Lives of the Twelve Caesars|Lives of the Twelve Caesars]]'' to [[w:Caesar Augustus|Caesar Augustus]]. The [[Kalends]] (also written ''[[Calends]]'') were specific days of the [[w:Roman calendar|Roman calendar]] (the first of the month), not of the [[w:Attic calendar|Greek]], and so the “Greek Kalends” would never occur.
  • adelaster Greek not manifest + a star.
  • adelocodonic Greek invisible + a bell.
  • adelopod {{etystub}} {{etyl|grc}} invisible + foot.
  • adelphia Greek 'adelfo`s brother.
  • adelphophagy {{etyl|el}} "adelpho" or ''brother'' + {{etyl|el}} "phagy" or to ''eat of''.
  • adelphous Greek 'adelfo`s brother.
  • adenophorous [[Aden]]o + Greek bearing.
  • adenophyllous [[Aden]]o + {{etyl|el}} leaf.
  • adenotomy From {{term|adeno-}} + {{etyl|el}} "a cutting", "to [[cut]]".
  • adiaphoron {{etyl|el}} ([[indifferent]])
  • adicity From {{etyl|grc}} root ''[[-ad]]'', + ''[[-icity]]''. Compare ''[[arity]]'', which comes from the corresponding Latin root.
  • aeaeae From {{etyl|el}} mythology, the name of the island on which Circe, a sorceress, lived.
  • Aegidius {{etyl|la|en}} Aegidius, from {{etyl|grc|en}}, meaning "kid skin" (sometimes interepreted as "the protecting").
  • Aeneid *IPA English pronunciation: [əˈniːɪd] *Latin Aeneis, pronounced [aɪˈne.ɪs] *the title is Greek in form: genitive case Aeneidos
  • aerate * {{etyl|el}} āero (''air'') * Latin ātus (''past tense of verb'')
  • aerodrome from Greek: ''[[aero-]]'' + ''[[-drome]]''
  • aeromancy From {{etyl|grc}} ''aero'', "[[air]]".
  • aeronomy From the Greek [[aero]]..
  • aforismi Probably from {{etyl|sv|fi}} {{term|aforism|lang=sv}}, ultimately from {{etyl|el|fi}}.
  • agale From Greek [[agalia]]
  • agathology From the [[Greek language|Greek]] ''[[agathos]]'' (good) and ''[[logos]]'' (discourse), and an eponym for the Greek poet, ''[[Agathon]]''.
  • agelast Derived from the Greek agelastos ("not laughing"), itself stemming from gelaein ("to laugh").
  • agogic {{etyl|el}} (agōgos), ''[[leader]]''
  • agonic {{etyl|el}} a- (''without'') + gōniā (''angle'')
  • agonistes {{etyl|el}} (agon), ''[[struggle]]''
  • ailuromancy {{etyl|el}} ''ailouros'', "a [[cat]]".
  • ailurophilia From ancient Greek '''[[ailuros]]''', "[[cat]]", and '''[[-philia]]''', "love".
  • aithochrous {{etyl|el}}.
  • akinetic [[a-]] + {{etyl|el}} word [[kinesis]]
  • Alanna A feminine form of [[Alan]]; variant spelling of [[Alana]]. Also possibly derived from Elaine (Old French) "bright, shining" or Helen (Greek) "light." The spelling [[Alannah]] is possibly influenced by names of Hebrew origin such as Hannah and Susannah and by the Anglo-Irish term of endearment "alannah" or "a leanbh" meaning "O child.". From the Celtic/Gaelic, Alanna possibly means "Fair". It can also be derived from the combination of the father`s name Allan, with the mother`s name Donna, to form Alanna.
  • alectoromancy {{etyl|el}} {{term|||tr=alektor|a rooster|lang=el}}.
  • alectryomancy From {{etyl|el}} {{term|||[[cock]]|lang=el}} + {{term|-mancy}}.
  • alectyromancy {{etyl|el}} {{term|||tr=alectryon|cock, or rooster|lang=el}}.
  • aleuromancy Greek ''aleuromanteion'', divination by flour, from Greek ''aleuron'', wheat flour.
  • Alex from Latin [[Alexander]], from Greek [[Alexandros]] 'he who wards of men', i.e. protector, possibly of [[Hittite]] origin, and from [[Alexis]], the French form of [[Alexius]].
  • Alex from Latin [[Alexander]], from Greek [[Alexandros]] 'he who wards of men', i.e. protector, possibly of [[Hittite]] origin
  • Alex From Latin [[Alexander]], from {{etyl|grc}} [[Alexandros]] 'he who wards of men', i.e. protector, possibly of Hittite origin; and from [[Alexius]], from the same {{etyl|grc}} root, ''alexios'' "helping, defending". These two origins of Alex are [[indistinguishable]] in most languages.
  • Alexandra Feminine form of [[Alexander]], from {{etyl|grc|sv}}.
  • Alexandra Feminine form of [[Alexander]], from {{etyl|grc}} ''Alexandros''.
  • algon From Greek, ''algos,'' "pain".
  • algoritme Via English {{term|algorithm}} from Middle Latin {{term|algorismus}}, a transliteration of Arabic ''al-Khowarizmi'' ("the man from Khowarizm"), surname of the well-known Persian mathematician [[:w:Muhammad ibn Mūsā al-Khwārizmī|Muhammad ibn Mūsā al-Khwārizmī]] who lived during the ninth century and introduced sophisticated mathematics to the West (particularly [[algebra]]). Was also influenced by Greek ''arithmos'' (number) due to a later mistaken connection.
  • alikreukel {{etyl|el}} ''(h)alikochlos'' (“sea snail”), through Afrikaans.
  • almanakka From {{OSw.|fi}} {{term|almanacha}}, ultimately from {{etyl|el|fi}} through {{etyl|la|fi}}.
  • alphitomancy Ancient Greek ''[[alphitomantis]]'', a diviner who used barley meal. From Ancient Greek ''[[alphiton]]'' (plural ''alphita''), barley meal.
  • Althea From [[Althaia]] in [[Greek]] [[mythology]].
  • Amazon Spanish, ''Río Amazonas''. It is common belief that the Spanish explorer Francisco de Orellana fought a battle against a tribe of [[Tapuya]] savages, in which the women fought alongside the men. He no doubt derived the name from the Amazons in Greek mythology.
  • Amazonian From '''[[Amazon]]''', a river in South America named after a group of women warriors of Greek mythology.
  • ammoniakki From {{etyl|sv|fi}} {{term|ammoniak}}, ultimately from {{etyl|el|fi}} through {{etyl|la|fi}}.
  • amnion From {{etyl|la}} for "membrane around a fetus", from Greek "bowl in which the blood of victims was caught", from ''ame'', (bucket)
  • amphibius From {{etyl|grc|la}}
  • amphiphile From the Greek "amphis" = both, and "philia" = love
  • amphora {{wikipedia}} From ancient Greek.
  • amphoteric {{etyl|el}} (ampho), ''[[both]]''
  • amygdaloid {{etyl|el}} almond + ''[[-oid]]''
  • amyloid From {{etyl|el}} [[amylon]] meaning "starch."
  • Anagramm From Greek [[anagraphein]]
  • analgesia From {{NL.}} < {{etyl|el}} {{term|||tr=an-|without|lang=el}} + {{term|||tr=algesis|sense of pain|lang=el}} < {{term|||tr=algos|pain|lang=el}}.
  • analog Greek ''ana'' fr. ''an-'' + ''logos''
  • analyse From [[Greek]] {{term|analysis}} ([[dissolution]]), from {{term|analyein}} ([[unloose]]), from ''ana-'' ([[up]], [[throughout]]) + ''lysis'' (a [[loosening]]).
  • anapodoton From {{etyl|grc|en}} {{term|||tr=anapodoton|lang=grc}}
  • anason from Turkish ''[[anason]]''< Greek ''[[anison]]''
  • anatripsis From the Greek term meaning ''rubbing up''
  • ancient Greek ''[[ancient]]'' + ''[[Greek]]''
  • ancora From {{etyl|grc|la}} {{attention|grc}}
  • anemie From {{etyl|fr}} [[anémie]], itself from {{etyl|el}}
  • anemious {{etyl|el}} (windy)
  • anesthetic From Greek ''[[anaisthetos]]'' insensible.
  • Angela Feminine form of Church Latin Angelus, from {{etyl|grc}} ''angelos'' "messenger, angel". Name of an Italian 15th/16th century saint.
  • angelică {{etyl|el|ro}} ''[[anghélika]]''
  • Angelopoulos Angel (''Angelo'') + [[-poulos]], from Greek.
  • Angelopoulou From Greek [[angel]] (''Angelo'') + [[-poulou]]
  • anise Old French ''[[anis]]''< Latin ''[[anisum]]''< ancient Greek ''[[anison]]''
  • ankylosaurus {{etyl|el}} (ankylo), ''[[stiffen]]'' + (sauros), ''[[lizard]]''
  • Ann The English form of [[Anna]], the {{etyl|grc|en}} New Testament form of the {{etyl|he|en}} female name [[Hannah]], meaning 'grace; gracious'.
  • anorthite Greek "less than straight, not perpendicular" - a reference to the odd angles at which crystals grow.
  • ante- A {{etyl|la}} preposition and prefix; akin to Greek {{term|anti|lang=grc}}, Sanskrit {{term|anti|lang=sa}}, Gothic {{term|𐌰𐌽𐌳-|sc=Goth|tr=and-|lang=got}}, {{term|𐌰𐌽𐌳𐌰-|sc=Goth|tr=anda-|lang=got}} (only in comp.), {{term|AS.|lang=got}}, {{term|and-|lang=got}}, {{term|ond-|lang=got}}, (only in comp.: compare {{term|answer}}, {{term|along}}, German {{term|ant-|lang=de}}, {{term|ent-|lang=de}} (in comp.). {{rfscript|Devanagari}}
  • anthomania {{etyl|el}} (anthos) ''[[flower]]'' and the suffix ''[[mania]]''
  • anthropod From {{etyl|grc}} '''anthrop-''' "human" + '''pod''' "foot"
  • anthropomancy Greek ''anthropos'', [[human being]].
  • anthropophagus From {{etyl|grc|la}}
  • Anthropos From {{etyl|grc|en}}
  • anthroposophy From Greek ''anthrop'' or ''anthropo'' (person or man) and the suffix ''-sophy'' (study or knowledge of).
  • antistrophe From Latin, from Greek: to turn to the opposite side; against + to turn. See [[strophe]].
  • antithesis From Greek words "anti" = "[[against]]" and "thesis" = "[[position]]".
  • apantomancy Greek ''apantomai'', to meet.
  • Aphrodite From the Greek ''aphros'', (sea foam) + ''-ite'', (Greek ending denoting a person associated with a place, etc.) From Albanian (Illyrian [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Illyrian]) ''aphro'' = near + ''dite'' = day, litteraly ''Nearday'' refering to the planet Venus as the mornig star. (Aphrodite is Roman Venus)
  • aphyllous 19th Century, from [[New Latin]], from [[Greek]], A + ''[[phullon]]'' ([[leaf]]).
  • apnée {{etyl|el|fr}}
  • apocopation {{etyl|el}} (apo), to cut + (koptein), away from
  • apocryphal From [[w:Vulgar Latin|Late Latin]] '''[[apocryphus]]''' ''secret, not approved for public reading'', from [[w:Ancient Greek|Greek]] '''[[apokryphos]]''' ''hidden, obscure'', thus ''([[books]]) of unknown authorship'' (especially those included in the Septuagint and Vulgate but not originally written in Hebrew and not counted as genuine by the Jews), from '''[[apo-]]''' ''away'' + '''[[kryptein]]''' ''to hide''. Properly plural (the single would be apocryphon), but commonly treated as a collective singular. Apocryphal ''of doubtful authenticity'' is from 1590.
  • Apoda From Greek for 'without foot'
  • apodal *From Greek ''[[apoda]]''- without, +''[[pous]]'' foot
  • apologetic {{etyl|el}} ?, from ? to speak in defense of; ? from + ? speech, ? to say, to speak. See [[Logic]].
  • apoptosis Term coined in 1972 by John F. Kerr ''et al.'' in their article "Apoptosis: a basic biological phenomenon with wide-ranging implications in tissue kinetics" published in volume 26 of the ''British Journal of Cancer''. It is derived from the Greek word meaning "falling off," such as leaves falling off a tree.
  • apple of discord With reference to the golden apple in Greek [[mythology]], inscribed ‘for the fairest female’, which sparked dissent among the gods and led to the judgment of Paris, and ultimately to the Trojan war.
  • apple of somebody's eye Refers to the Greek myth of Eris and the [[golden apple]], which attracted the [[desire]]s of [[Hera]], [[Athena]], and [[Aphrodite]].
  • apócope From the Greek [[apokópe]], "[[amputation]]"
  • Aquila chrysaetos Latin eagle + Greek golden
  • arachnomancy {{etyl|el}} {{term|||tr=arachne|a [[spider]]|lang=el}}.
  • arachnophobia {{etyl|la}} from Greek ''arachnophobia'' literally ''fear of spiders'' from ''[[arachnos]]'' spider + ''[[phobos]]'' fear.
  • archaism 17th Century, from [[New Latin]], from [[Greek]], from ''[[arkhaizein]]'' to model one's style upon that of ancient writers.
  • archenemy {{etyl|el}} (arkhos), ''[[chief]]'' + enemy
  • archiater From {{etyl|grc|la}}
  • Archimedean solid From [[w:Archimedes|Archimedes]] Greek mathematician and engineer
  • arctophobia {{etyl|el}} [[arktos]] bear + [[-phobia]]
  • areo- {{etyl|el}} (Ares), the planet Mars
  • argus-eyed From the Greek mythological figure [[Argus]];
  • Aristoteles From the [[Greek]] philosopher [[w:Aristotle|Aristotle]].
  • arity From ''[[-ary]]'', based on a Latin root. Compare ''[[adicity]]'' and ''[[adinity]]'', based on the corresponding Greek root.
  • Artemia {{etyl|el}} [[Artemis]]
  • Artemiidae {{etyl|el}} [[Artemis]]
  • Artemiina {{etyl|el}} [[Artemis]]
  • arthritis Greek ''[[arthro-]]'', [[joint]] + ''[[-itis]]'', [[inflammation]]
  • asphodel Greek, ''asphodelos''
  • aspidomancy Greek ''aspid-'' from ''aspis'', a [[shield]].
  • ass Used chiefly in North America. A vulgar usage of {{term|arse}} (used in the UK and Australia), from {{proto|Germanic|ars-oz}}. Cognates include the Old High German {{term|ars|lang=goh}}, Old Norse {{term|ars|lang=non}} (now {{term|Arsch|lang=de}} in German), Old Frisian {{term|ers|lang=ofs}} and Greek {{term||tr=orrhos|lang=el}}. Ultimately from the reconstructed {{proto|Indo-European|Orse|backside, buttocks, butt}}.
  • asteroid < {{etyl|grc}} aster, a star + eidos, form
  • asthenopia New Latin, "weak vision", ultimately from Greek roots as follows: ''a-'', without + ''sthenos'', strength + -''opia'', visual condition (from ''op'', eye)
  • astragalomancy * {{etyl|grc}} ''astragalos'', one of the [[vertebrae]]. * {{etyl|grc}} ''astragaloi'' (plural), a type of dice made from the knuckle bones of sheep.
  • astral < {{LL.}} {{term|astralis}} < {{etyl|la}} {{term|astrum||a star}} < {{etyl|grc}} ...
  • astroid < {{etyl|grc}} astron, a star + eidos, form
  • Asus The name Asus originated from [[Pegasus]], the winged [[horse]] of [[Greek]] [[mythology]] {{wikipedia}}
  • atemporal From the {{etyl|grc}} {{term|sc=polytonic|ἀ-|tr=a-|lang=grc}} ("not") + from the [[{{la}}]] {{la-noun|tempus ("[[time]]")|temporis|tempōris|n|third}}
  • athetize From {{etyl|grc}} {{term|||tr=athetos|lang=grc|removed}}
  • Atlas From the Greek Mythological figure ''[[Atlas]]'' (see below), meaning "The Bearer (of the Heavens)", from ''tlenai'', (to suffer, endure, [[bear]]).
  • Atropos Meaning ''inflexible'' or ''not turning'', from the Greek ''a-'', (not) + ''tropos'', (to turn)''.
  • Augean A reference to [[w:Augeas|Augeas]], a figure in Greek mythology whose stables were never cleaned until [[w:Hercules|Hercules]] was given the task of cleaning them.
  • autecology From {{etyl|el}} (and Latin) [[auto-]] 'on itself' + [[ecology]]
  • Authentifizierung From Greek [[authentikos]]
  • Authentisierung From Greek [[authentikos]]
  • autobiography From {{etyl|el}} '''auto''' + '''bios''' + '''graphein'''
  • autocannibalism Greek: ''autos'': self Spanish: ''Caníbal'' (plural: ''Caníbales''): the name given by [[w:Christopher Columbus|Christopher Columbus]] to the [[w:Caribs|Caribs]] of [[w:Cuba|Cuba]] and [[w:Haiti|Haiti]] who allegedly ate human flesh.
  • autodidact *From [[Greek]] [[autodidaktos]]: [[auto-]] + [[didaktos]] ([[taught]]).
  • autotheism Greek: ''autos'': self and ''theos'': god
  • axinomancy {{etyl|la}} ''[[axinomantia]]'' < {{etyl|el}} ''ax'' or ''axine'', an [[axe]]+ ''[[-mancy]]''.
  • axiou From the Greek ''[[axioun]]''.
  • azelaic From ''[[azo]]'' + {{etyl|el}} (elaion), ''[[olive tree]]'' + [[-ic]]
  • Bacchanalia Latin ''Bacchanal'' a place devoted to Bacchus; in the plural Bacchanalia a feast of Bacchus, from ''Bacchus'' the god of wine, Greek Βακχος.
  • Balaenoptera From {{etyl|la}} {{term|balaena||whale}} and {{etyl|el}} {{term|ptero-||wing}}, a reference to the long wing-like side fins of certain whales.
  • Bar Scholary creation from {{etyl|el|de}} ''[[báros]]'' (weight).
  • barysphere Greek ''barus'' 'heavy' + ''sphere''.
  • basilica From [[Latin]] ''basilica'', from [[Greek]] ''basilike'', from ''basilike stoa'', "royal hall".
  • bathophobia The word is derived from the Greek "bathos", meaning "[[depth]]", and "phobos", meaning "fear".
  • bathyscaphe : '''bathy-''' ([[Greek]]: ''deep'' or ''depth'') + '''scaphe''' ([[Latin]]: ''boat'')
  • belomancy {{etyl|el}} ''[[belos]]'', an arrow, dart. [[-mancy]] suffix for [[divination]].
  • Bernice Biblical form of {{etyl|grc}} [[Berenice]] .
  • beryllus From {{etyl|grc|la}} {{rfe|lang=grc}}
  • between a rock and a hard place Related to the concept of the Ancient Greeks: "between [[w:Scylla|Scylla]] and [[w:Charybdis|Charybdis]]." Originated in the United States, possibly in the wake of the [[w:Bisbee Deportation|Bisbee Deportation]].
  • bibliobibuli The term was coined in 1957 by H.L. Mencken, who said "There are people who read too much: the bibliobibuli". From the Greek "biblio", meaning books, and the Latin "bibulous", from "bibere" (to drink). "There are people who read too much: bibliobibuli. I know some who are constantly drunk on books, as other men are drunk on whiskey or religion. They wander through this most diverting and stimulating of worlds in a haze, seeing nothing and hearing nothing".
  • bibliomancy From {{etyl|el}} ''biblio'' "book" + ''[[-mancy]]'', confer French ''[[bibliomancie]]''.
  • bion {{back-form|bionic|nodot=1}},< {{etyl|el}} {{term|||living|lang=el}}.
  • bioscope {{etyl|el}} ''bios'': life + ''scopien'': to look at.
  • Blatt Old High German ''blat'', originally *''[[blad]]'', from the Germanic root ''*blada-'' "leaf", related (via an Indo-European root) to {{etyl|el}} ''phyllon'', {{etyl|la}} ''[[folium]].
  • blida Since Old Swedish ''blidha'', from Medieval Latin ''blida'' with the same meaning. Originally from Greek ''ballein'' "to throw".
  • bodega From Latin '''[[apotheca]]''', ''storehouse'', from Greek.
  • bodega Spanish, from Latin '''[[apotheca]]''', ''[[storehouse]]'', from Greek.
  • Bogdan {{unreferenced}} It was formed from: * "bog" - meaning "God"; of Scythian/Indo-Iranian origin; its original meaning was riches, abundance, and good fortune, as it was still used in the name of [[Baghdad]] and in the Slavic ''bogatŭ'' (rich); however with time it became a title of Mithra and then from there it replaced the Slavic Indo-European name of the celestial God *Deivos (Latin "Deus", Sanskrit "Deva", German "Ziu") some time after the split between the Baltic and Slavic languages (as Lithuanian still keeps "Dievas"). * "dan" - "gift", of Indo-European origins, akin to Latin "donum", Greek "dorus", Welsh "dawn" or Irish "dán". There are also some other languages in which we can find names meaning "gift of God" such as Greek ([[Theodore]]), Latin ([[Adeodatus]] and [[Deusdedit]]) Arabic ([[Ataullah]]) and Hebrew ([[Jonathan]] and [[Nathaniel]]).
  • boreal {{etyl|la}} [[borealis]], ''[[northern]]'', from {{etyl|el}} (''Boreas''), personification of the north wind
  • botanomancy {{etyl|el}} ''botano-'', from ''botane'', [[plant]].
  • bottom Old English ''[[botm]]'', bodan "ground, soil, lowest part," from [[Proto-Germanic]] *buthm- (cf. [[Old Frisian]] boden "soil," [[German]] Boden "ground, earth, soil"), from [[Proto-Indo-European]] base *bhudh- (cf. [[Sanskrit]] budhnah, [[Greek]] pythmen "foundation," [[Latin]] fundus "bottom, piece of land, farm," [[Old Irish]] bond "sole of the foot"). Meaning "posterior of a man" is from 1794; the verb "to reach the bottom of" is from 1808. Bottom dollar "the last dollar one has" is from 1882.
  • bourse From {{ML.}} ''[[bursa]]'', from {{etyl|grc}} (bursa) 'leather'.
  • bouzouki From {{etyl|el}} {{term|mpouzoúki|lang=el}}, from {{etyl|tr}} {{term|bozuk|lang=tr}} <ref>[http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/bouzouki "bouzouki."] ''Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1).'' Random House, Inc. 26 Nov. 2008.</ref>
  • bracchium From {{etyl|grc|la}}.
  • Bulle Probably a [[pars pro toto]] expression, from a very old root (related to {{etyl|el}} ''phallos'' "[[penis]]"), with the related meaning "ball".
  • bürokrat {{etyl|fr|crh}} '''[[bureaucratie#French|bureaucratie]]''' ( '''[[bureau]]''' + Greek suffix '''-kratia''' - ''power of'' ).
  • caballus Disputed. Generally believed<ref name="origins">Origins, by Eric Partridge, [http://books.google.com/books?id=xA9dxrhfa5kC&pg=PA85 p. 85]</ref> to be from {{Gau.|la}} {{term|caballos|lang=cel}}.<ref>Delamare 2003 p.96</ref> Also proposed is Ancient Greek kaballēs, in turn possibly a borrowing from a Balkan or north-east European language. Cognate to Welsh {{term|caballus|lang=cy}},<ref>The Origin of Language and Nations, by Rowland Jones [http://books.google.com/books?id=xzcQAAAAIAAJ&pg=PT151 p. 151]</ref><ref name="origins"/> Manx {{term|cabbyl|lang=gv}},<ref name="origins"/> Scottish Gaelic and Irish {{term|capall}}.<ref name="origins"/>
  • cacodyl {{etyl|el}} (kakodes) ''evil smelling''
  • cacoepist Greek
  • cacoepistic Greek
  • cacoepy Greek ''kakos'' [[bad]] + ''epos'' a [[word]].
  • cacophonic {{etyl|el}} ''kakos'': bad + ''phone'': sound.
  • cacophonous {{etyl|el}} (kakos), ''[[bad]]'' + (phone), ''[[sound]]''
  • calisthenic From Greek kallos = beauty, sthenos = strength
  • Callippic For [[w:Callippus|Callippus]] Greek astronomer and mathematician
  • calyx {{etyl|la}} ''calyx'' from {{etyl|el}} ''kalyx''
  • canapé From {{ML.|fr}} [[canapeum]], an alteration of [[canopeum]] 'mosquito net', itself from {{etyl|la|fr}} [[conopeum]] '(seat with a) baldaquin', from {{etyl|el|fr}} [[konopion]], from [[konops]] 'mosquito' - cognate with [[canopy]]
  • canker {{etyl|enm}} [[canker]], [[cancre]], {{etyl|ang}} [[cancer]] (akin to Dutch ''[[kanker]]'', Old High German ''[[chanchar]]''.), From {{etyl|la}} ''[[cancer]]'' a cancer; or if a native word, compare Greek excrescence on tree, gangrene. Compare also Old French ''[[cancre]]'', French ''[[chancere]]'', from Latin ''[[cancer]]''. See [[cancer]], and compare ''[[chancre]]''.
  • capnomancy {{etyl|grc}} {{term|||tr=kapnos|smoke|lang=grc}}.
  • cardia {{etyl|el}} kardiā (''heart'')
  • carquois Via Late Greek from {{etyl|fa|fr}}.
  • cartography From {{etyl|el}} ''[[chartis]]'' (map) + ''[[graphein]]'' (write)
  • cata- {{etyl|el}} (kata) - downwards
  • cataract From {{etyl|la}} [[cataracta]] 'waterfall, portcullis', from {{etyl|el}} (''kataraktes''), from (''katarassèn'') 'to pour down'
  • catarrh From the Greek "katarrhein": kata- meaning "down" and rhein meaning "to flow."
  • catechize {{etyl|el}} {{term||katēchein|to teach (orally)}}, from {{term||kata-|down}} + {{term||ēchein|to sound, to resound}}.
  • catoblepas From {{etyl|grc|la}}
  • catoptric {{etyl|grc|en}} {{term||lang=grc|tr=katoptron|mirror}}
  • catoptromancy {{etyl|grc}} (katoptron), "mirror" < (kathoran) "look upon": (kata) down + (oran) to see.
  • causimomancy {{etyl|grc}} ''kausimos'', "fit for burning" < ''kausis'', "burning heat".
  • Centaur {ME}; Latin ''[[Centaurus]];'' ''Greek ''(Kentauros);'' (Eng. usg. ca. 14c)
  • Cephalochordata {{etyl|el}}
  • cephalochordate {{etyl|el}}
  • cephalomancy {{etyl|grc}} ''kephalos'', "head".
  • Cephalopoda From {{etyl|el}} (cephalon) 'head' + (pod) 'foot'
  • ceramic Ceramic was borrowed from the French word, ''ceramique'' in the 19th century. This derives from the Greek word ''[[keram(os)]]'', which means ''[[potter]]'s [[clay]]''.
  • Ceratopsia From Greek "horned faces". One of the first named genera was ''[[Ceratops]]'' itself, which lent its name to the group, although it is considered a ''[[nomen dubium]]'' today as it has no distinguishing characteristics that are not also found in other ceratopsians.
  • ceraunoscopy {{etyl|grc}} ''keraunos'', "thunder, a thunderbolt"
  • cerebropathy ''Cerebrum'' + Greek ''suffering'', coined for medical usage prior to 1913.
  • ceresia From Greek
  • ceromancy {{etyl|grc}} (keros), "wax".
  • Ceylon From {{etyl|el}} {{term|Sielen Diva|lang=el}}, from {{etyl|pi}} {{term|sihalam|tr=silam|lang=pi}}, from {{etyl|sa}} {{term|sinhala|lang=sa}} {{term|dwipa||island|lang=sa}}; ''sinhala'' derived from {{term|sinha||lion|lang=sa}}.
  • chalco- {{etyl|el}}
  • chalcogen {{etyl|el}} {{term||tr=chalco-}} + {{term|halogen}}.
  • chambered nautilus Latin < Greek ''[[nautilos]]'' (nautilus, sailor).
  • chaomancy {{etyl|grc}} (Paracelsian) ''chaos'', "the atmosphere".
  • charientism From ancient {{etyl|el}}, ''[[charientismus]]''.
  • Charmian Neuter diminutive form of the {{etyl|grc|en}} word for "joy".
  • chart From Greek ''[[chartes]]'', Latin ''[[carta]]'', '''chart'''. Charte, a sheet of paper to which the Stoic philosophers compared the soul at birth.
  • chartomancy {{etyl|grc}} ''chartes'', "a leaf of paper".
  • chasma From {{etyl|el}} "a cleft, abyss"
  • chilia- From {{etyl|la}} [[chiliad-]], [[chilias]], itself from {{etyl|el}} [[chilioi]] 'thousand'
  • chimerical From {{term|chimera}} < {{etyl|la}} {{term|chimaera|lang=la}}, < {{etyl|grc}} {{term|||tr=chimaira|she-goat|lang=grc}}. This term entered English around 1638.
  • chiropractic From ''[[chiro-]]'' meaning "[[hand]]" from the Greek word ''kheir'' meaning "[[hand]]" + (praktikos) [[practical]]
  • Chlorophyta From {{etyl|el}} ''chloro'' (green) + [[-phyta]]
  • choler From English [[colre]], from Old French colre, from Latin [[cholera]], "[[jaundice]]", from Greek [[kholera]], from Greek [[khol]], "[[bile]]"
  • choleric From English [[colre]], from Old French colre, from Latin [[cholera]], "[[jaundice]]", from Greek [[kholera]], from Greek [[khol]], "[[bile]]"
  • cholic acid Mid 19th century, from Greek ''kholikos'', from ''kholē'' (''[[bile]]'').
  • Chondrichthyes Ancient Greek ''chondros'' = cartilage, ''ichthys'' = fish
  • choreography From {{etyl|fr}} ''[[chorégraphie]]'', from {{etyl|el}} ''[[khoreia]]'' "dance" and ''[[graphein]]'' "to write".
  • chorégraphie From {{etyl|el}} ''[[khoreia]]'' "dance" and ''[[graphein]]'' "to write".
  • chronologise : From [[Chronos]] the Greek god of time.
  • chronomètre From {{etyl|el}} ''[[chronos]]'' and ''[[metron]]''.
  • Chrysanthemum {{etyl|el}} [[golden]] [[flower]]
  • cikla Common Slavic *''[[svekla]]'', from Greek
  • cimmerian {{etyl|el}} (Kimmerioi) the ''[[Cimmerian]]s''
  • cistrome This term was coined by investigators at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School Technologies, from the words ''[[cis]]'' (DNA segment) and ''[[ome]]'' (Greek word for manager)
  • Classical Greek ''[[classical]]'' + ''[[Greek]]''
  • claustrophilia From the Latin ''[[claustrum]]'' "a shut in place," from ''[[claudere]]'' "to close" + Greek ''[[philia]]'' "affection," from ''[[philos]]'' "love."
  • claustrophobia {{etyl|la}} ''[[claustrum]]'' "a shut in place," from ''[[claudere]]'' "to close" + Greek ''[[phobos]]'' "fear." First attested in the British Medical Journal.
  • cledonomancy {{etyl|grc}} ''kledon'', "an omen".
  • cleido- From {{etyl|grc|fr}}
  • cleidomancy {{etyl|grc}} ''kleis'', "a key".
  • cleromancy {{etyl|grc}} ''kleros'', "a lot".
  • Clio From the Greek ''kleein'', (to make famous, celebrate)
  • Cnidaria {{etyl|el}} (knide), ''[[nettle]]''
  • cockatrice First attested [[w:1382|1382]], from {{etyl|fro}} [[cocatris]], from {{LL.}} [[calcatrix]], from {{etyl|la}} [[calcare]] "to [[tread]]," from Greek [[ikhneumon]] "[[tracker]], [[tracer]]."
  • cocodrilo Latin ''[[crocodilus|crocodīlus]]'', from Greek
  • coenure {{etyl|el}} [[common]] + [[tail]]
  • colic From the French adjective, ''colique'', which referred to the lower part of the intestinal cavity. Prior to that it comes from the Latin, ''coliculus'' and earlier from Greek, kolik-os with the same meaning.
  • columnist From '''[[column]]''', from Latin and Greek, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European '''*[[kwel]]'''
  • comme un dératé The original form was {{term|courir comme un dératé}}. The Ancient Greeks attributed [[side stitch]]es to the [[spleen]], and although the actual ablation was never successful, the idea that a person without a spleen would run faster was prevalent in the 18th and stuck in this idiom, which was eventually extended to any sort of quick movement or effort.
  • computed axial tomography scan {{etyl|el}} tomos (''slice'') + graphia (''describing'')
  • coppice From {{etyl|fro}} [[coupeiz]] "a cut-over forest," from presumed {{LL.}} [[colpaticium]] "having the quality of being cut," from *[[colpare]] "to cut, strike," from {{ML.}} [[colpus]] "a blow", from {{VL.}} colapus, from {{etyl|la}} [[colaphus]] "a cuff, box on the ear," from {{etyl|el}} [[kolaphos]] "a blow, slap." * In 1578, the contracted form [[copse]] arose, meaning "small wood grown for purposes of periodic cutting"
  • Cora Name apparently invented by James Fenimore Cooper in ''The Last of the Mohicans''(1826); it could represent Greek ''kore''"maiden".
  • cornice Perhaps from Latin ''[[cornix]]'', 'crow', influenced by Greek ''[[koronis]]'', 'crown'.
  • cort From Greek
  • coryphaeus Latin, ''leader'', from Greek ''koruphaios'', from Greek koruphē, ''head''.
  • coscinomancy {{etyl|grc}} ''koskinomantis'', "a diviner using a sieve" < ''koskinon'', "a sieve".
  • cosmo- {{etyl|el}} (kosmos), ''[[universe]]''
  • cosmopoleis From {{etyl|el}} [[cosmo-]] ''[[world]], [[universe]]'' + [[-poleis]] ''[[cities]]''.
  • cosmopolis From {{etyl|el}} [[cosmo-]] ''[[world]], [[universe]]'' + [[-polis]] ''[[city]]''.
  • cosmopolises From {{etyl|el}} [[cosmo-]] ''[[world]], [[universe]]'' + [[-polis]] ''[[city]]'' + [[-es]] postsibilant pluralising suffix.
  • cosmosophy From Greek ''cosmo-'' or ''cosm-'' (derivative of ''cosmos'') and suffix ''-sophy'', respectively "universe" and "knowledge or study of".
  • cream From {{etyl|fro}} {{term|cresme}} (modern: ''[[crème]]''), blend of {{LL.}} {{term|chrisma}} "ointment" (from {{etyl|el}} {{term|chrisma}} "unguent"), and {{LL.}} {{term|cramum}} "cream", perhaps from {{Gau.}}. Replaced {{etyl|ang}} ''ream''. Borrowed again from {{etyl|fr}} in the 1800s, as {{term|creme}}. Figurative sense of "most excellent element or part" appears from 1581. Verb meaning "to beat, thrash, wreck" is 1929, U.S. colloquial.
  • credophile Coined by [[w:L. Sprague de Camp|L. Sprague de Camp]] from Latin ''[[credere]]'', '''to believe''', + [[-o-]] (a connecting vowel from French, from Latin, from Greek, connecting vowel of most nouns and adjectives in combination) [[-phile]], '''a liker of something''', from French ''-phile'', from Latin ''-philus'', from Greek ''-philos'', '''beloved, loving, lover''', from ''philein'', '''to love''' First known use is in a personal letter from de Camp to [[w:James Randi|James Randi]] (which is thought to still exist in Randi's archives but is not readily available for study).
  • Crenarchaeota Greek [[krene]] spring+ [[archae]] old + [[-otes]] quality
  • cricoid From Greek ''krikoeides'' meaning "ring-shaped."
  • crinoid {{etyl|el}} krinon (''lily'') + oeidēs (''oid'')
  • criterium {{etyl|la}} from {{etyl|el}}
  • crithomancy {{etyl|grc}} ''krithomanteia'', "divination by barley" < ''krithe'', "barley"
  • cromniomancy {{etyl|grc}} ''kromyon'' or ''krommyon'', "an onion".
  • cronometro {{etyl|el}} (chronos), ''[[time]]'' + (metron), ''[[measure]]''
  • Cronus Possibly from the Greek ''kreno'', (to reign over or govern).
  • cryonics {{etyl|el}} ''kryos'', "icy cold"
  • cryopreservation {{etyl|el}} ''kryos'', "icy cold"
  • cryptic From {{LL.}} {{term|crypticus||lang=la}}, from {{etyl|grc|en}} {{term|||lang=grc|tr=kruptikos}}, from {{term|||tr=kruptos|lang=grc|hidden}}, from {{term|||tr=kruptein|lang=grc|to hide}}
  • cryptid {{etyl|el}} {{i|kryptos}} + {{etyl|la}} {{term|-ides|lang=la}}. (English usage 1983; coined by John E. Wall in the ''ISC Newsletter'').
  • crónica {{etyl|la|es}} ''[[chronica|chroni˘ca]]'', from {{etyl|el|es}}
  • cunnus Uncertain, theorized to come from the stem of {{proto|Indo-European|gʷḗn|woman|lang=}}, whence it would be cognate with Mycenaean Greek {{term|𐀓𐀙𐀊|tr=ku-na-ja|sc=Linb}}, Old English {{term|cwene|lang=ang}}, {{proto|Slavic|žena|lang=|title=Common Slavic}}, Sanskrit {{term|जनि|sc=Deva|tr=jani|lang=sa}}. Other theoretic relation is to Latin {{term|cuneus||wedge|lang=la}}.
  • cupidity Derived from ''[[cupere]]'' "to desire"; related to Sanskrit ''[[kupyati]]'' "bubbles up, becomes agitated"; the Latin nominal form ''[[cupido]]'' was personified as the Roman god of love, [[Cupido]], cognate with the Greek [[Eros]].
  • cvikla Common Slavic *''[[svekla]]'', from Greek
  • cyanic From {{etyl|el}} a dark blue substance. Compare French [[cyanique]], See [[kyanite]].
  • Cyclades {{etyl|el}} ''[[kyklos]]'' 'circle' + ''[[-ades]]''
  • cyclomancy {{etyl|grc}} ''kyklos'', "circle".
  • cyclopia {{etyl|el}} (Cyclops)
  • cyclus {{etyl|la}} cyclus from {{etyl|el}} (''kyklos'') 'circle'
  • cyma {{NL.}} from {{etyl|el}}
  • cymotrichous Greek kuma, wave + trich-, hair
  • cynic Derived either from the building in Athens called ''Kynosarges'', the earliest home of the Cynic school, or from the Greek word for a dog (''kyon''), in contemptuous allusion to the uncouth and aggressive manners adopted by the members of the school.
  • Cynthia From an {{etyl|grc|en}} epithet of the moon goddess [[Artemis]] ( [[Diana]]), "from the Mount Kynthos( on [[Delos]] island)" <ref>Patrick Hanks and Flavia Hodges: A Concise Dictionary of First Names. Oxford University Press.2001</ref>
  • cypress From {{etyl|el}} ''[[kuparissos]]''.
  • dactylography From the Greek word ''daktylios'' meaning "[[finger]]" combined with the suffix [[-graphy]]
  • dactylomancy Greek ''dakterlios'', finger ring. -mancy, [[divination]].
  • dactylonomy From {{etyl|el}}
  • Damaris Of uncertain origin, possibly from {{etyl|grc}} as a variation of ''damalis'' "calf".
  • Damon {{etyl|grc}} name famous for the story of ''Damon and [[Pythias]]''; derivative of ''damān'' "to tame, subdue".
  • date From French ''date'', {{LL.}} ''[[data]]'', from Latin ''[[datus]]'' given, past participle of ''[[dare]]'' to give; akin to Greek, Old Slavonic ''[[dati]]'', Sanskrit ''[[dā]]''. Compare [[datum]], [[dose]], [[Dato]], [[Die]]
  • datolite From. Greek to divide + [[-lite]]; in allusion to the granular structure of a massive variety
  • Decapoda {{etyl|el}} (deca), ''[[ten]]'' + (podos), ''[[foot]]''
  • Decapodiformes {{etyl|el}} ''[[ten]] [[limb]]s''
  • decathlon From the Greek stem ''[[dec]]'' meaning ''[[ten]]''
  • decent ''Proper to one's station or rank'', also ''tasteful'', from [[w:Middle French|Middle French]] '''decent''', from {{etyl|la}} '''[[decentem]]''' (nominative ''[[decens]]'', genitive ''[[decentis]]''), present participle of {{term|decere||to be fitting or suitable}}, from {{proto|Indo-European|deke-}}, from base {{proto|Indo-European|title=|dek-|to take, accept, to receive, greet, be suitable}} (compare Greek {{term|dokein||to appear, seem, think}}, {{term|dekhesthai||to accept}}; Sanskrit {{term|dacasyati||shows honor, is gracious}}, {{term|dacati||makes offerings, bestows}}). Meaning ''kind, pleasant'' is from 1902.
  • Decima From {{etyl|el}} meaning ''the tenth''.
  • deipnosophist Greek ''[deipnosofisth's]'' ''[deipnon]'' a meal + ''[sofisth's]'' a wise man, [[sophist]]
  • Delia Classical Greek epithet of the goddess [[Artemis]], referring to her birth on the island of [[Delos]].
  • demiurgus From ''[[demios]]'' (of the people); from the {{etyl|el}} ''[[demiourgos]]''.
  • democratic From Greek prefix ''[[demo-]]'' "people" + Greek ''kratia'' "rule".
  • Demogorgon A [[pseudo-]][[Greek]] [[mythological]] [[figure]] most likely actually invented [[Christian]] scholar ca 350-400 CE. The origins of the name are uncertain, partly because the figure itself was possibly of imaginary coinage. Various theories suggest that the name is derived from the Greek words ''[[daemon]]'' ('[[spirit]]' given the Christian connotations of '[[demon]]' in the early Middle Ages)— or, less likely ''[[demos]]'' ('[[people]]')— and ''[[Gorgon]]'' or ''[[gorgos]]'' ('[[grim]]'). A less accepted theory claims that it is derived from a variation of '[[demiurge]]'.
  • Demotic Greek From [[demotic]] + [[Greek]]
  • dendromancy {{etyl|grc}} ''dendron'', "tree".
  • Denise Latin [[Dionysia]], feminine form of [[Dionysius]], a male name of Greek origin indicating "Dedication to [[Dionysus]]". Dionysus is the mythological Greek god of wine responsible for growth of the vines and the originator of winemaking.
  • dermatology {{etyl|el}} ''[[derma]]'' "skin" + [[-logy]]
  • dermo- From {{etyl|grc}} (derma), ''[[skin]]''
  • Dermoptera {{etyl|el}} (derma), ''[[skin]]'' + (pteron), ''[[wing]]
  • desmology * From {{etyl|grc}} "desmos" (ligament) + "logos" (study)
  • Deuterostomia {{etyl|el}} ''[[second]] [[mouth]]''
  • diabetes From the classical Greek transliterated as "diabainein," meaning "to pass through,", '''siphon''', it is from the participle of this verb, and therefore means passing through.  This refers to the excessive amounts of urine produced by sufferers.
  • diabolic First attested between 1350 and 1400 from [[w:Middle English|Middle English]] ''[[diabolik]]'', from [[w:Middle French|Middle French]] ''[[diabolique]]'', from [[w:Late Latin|Late Latin]] ''[[diabolicus]]'', from [[w:Greek|Greek]] {{term|diabolikos|diabolikós|devilish|lang=el}}, from [[diabolos]].<ref>{{R:Dictionary.com 1.1}}</ref> See [[devil]].
  • diabolical First attested between 1350 and 1400 from [[w:Middle English|Middle English]] ''[[diabolik]]'', from [[w:Middle French|Middle French]] ''[[diabolique]]'', from [[w:Late Latin|Late Latin]] ''[[diabolicus]]'', from [[w:Greek|Greek]] {{term|diabolikos|diabolikós|devilish|lang=el}}, from [[diabolos]].<ref>{{R:Dictionary.com 1.1}}</ref> See [[devil]].
  • diachronic From {{etyl|el}} ''dia-'' through, along with + ''chronos'' time
  • diakoptics From the Greek ''[[dia]]'' (system) + ''[[koptic]]'' (tear).
  • dialektologia From {{etyl|el|pl}}
  • diallelic From {{etyl|el}} [[di-]], two + {{etyl|de}} [[allos]], other
  • Diana <!--From the Greek meaning "success", as in ''ta ekane diana'' which translates as "he hit target"--> {{etystub}}
  • Diapsida {{etyl|el}} (di), ''[[two]]'' + (hapsis), ''[[arch]]'' or ''[[loop]]''
  • dicastery Greek ''dikastes'', 'judges', from ''dike'' 'right, custom, judgement'
  • dichromatic From Greek, ''chrōmatikós'', pertaining to color
  • dimerous {{etyl|el}} ''di-'' two; ''meros'' part
  • Dimitri {{etyl|ru|fr}} [[Дмитрий]], ultimately from {{etyl|grc|fr}}.
  • dimity 15th Century. From [[Medieval Latin]] ''[[dimitum]]'', from [[Greek]] ''[[dimiton]]'', from ''[[di-]]'' + ''[[mitos]]'': thread of the [[warp]].
  • Dinosauria {{etyl|el}} (deinos), ''[[terrible]]'' + (sauros), ''[[lizard]]''
  • Dinosaurus {{etyl|el}} (deinos), ''[[monstrous]]'' + (sauros), ''[[lizard]]''
  • dinotherium {{etyl|el}} ''[[deinos]]'' ([[terrible]]), and ''[[therion]]'' (a [[beast]]).
  • Dionysius Derived from [[Dionysus]] or [[Dionysos]] from {{etyl|grc}} mythology.
  • diphallus {{etyl|el}} [[dis]]: twice + [[phallos]]: phallus
  • diphone From {{etyl|el}} [[di-]] ''[[two]]'' + [[phonos]] ''[[sound]]''.
  • Diploglossa {{etyl|el}} ''two-part'' + ''tongue''
  • Dipnoi {{etyl|el}} ''[[two]]'' + ''[[lung]]s''
  • dipsomania {{etyl|el}} ''dipsa'': thirst + ''mainomai'': madness.
  • disaster From Italian ''[[disastro]]'', disaster; originally meaning "unfavourable to one's stars", from ''[[dis-#Italian|dis-]]'', bad (compare [[dys-]]), + ''[[astro]]'', star, celestial body, from Latin ''[[astrum]]'', from Greek ''astron''.
  • dog days 1538, from {{etyl|la}} ''dies caniculares'', from {{etyl|el}}; originally from the hot summer days (in the [[Northern Hemisphere]]) when [[Sirius]] (the [[Dog Star]]), in [[Canis Major]], rose and set with the Sun ([[heliacal]] rising). The Greeks also made reference to these "dog days", and for the ancient Egyptians, [[c.]]3000 [[BCE|B.C.E.]], the rising of this star coincided with the summer [[solstice]] and the start of [[Nile]] flooding. The "dog" association apparently began here, as the star's [[hieroglyph]] was a dog, a watchdog for the flooding of the Nile.</br>
  • dogma From {{etyl|la}} '''dogma''' ''philosophical [[tenet]]'', from [[w:Ancient Greek|Greek]] '''dogma''' (genitive '''[[dogmatos]]''') ''opinion, tenet'', literally ''that which one thinks is true'', from '''[[dokein]]''' ''to seem good, think'' (see ''[[decent]]''). Treated in the 17c. -18c. as Greek, with plural '''[[dogmata]]'''.
  • domatium From {{etyl|grc}}
  • doula Origin from Greek doula meaning "servant-woman, slave."
  • Dromedar Latin ''[[dromedarius]]'' "fast running", from Greek ''dromas'' "running".
  • dulcimer From the {{etyl|el}} ''dulce melos'' (sweet sound).
  • dysfunction From the Greek ''[[dys]]'', meaning bad or abnormal, and the English ''function''.
  • dysmorphophilia '''dysmorhophilia''' < Greek ''dysmorphos'' (= badly formed) + ''philia '' (= love)
  • dysplasia From the Greek ''[[dys-]]'' ([[bad]] or [[ill]]) + ''plas(is)'', from ''plassein'' (to [[mold]]) + ''-ia'', (a formative ending used in Greek).
  • dysplastic From ''dysplas(is)-'' (see dysplasia) + ''-tic'' (a formative ending in Greek used for forming adjectives)
  • dédale From ''[[Dédale]]'' ‘[[w:Daedalus|Daedalus]]’, who built the Cretan Labyrinth in Greek mythology.
  • echopraxia Greek ''echo'' (repetition) and ''praxia'' (action).
  • eclampsia Coined Greek, from [[ecto-]], 'out of', and [[lampein]], 'to shine'.
  • ecolect From {{etyl|el}} ''eco (oikos)'' for house, and ''lect'' for language.
  • ecophobia {{etyl|el}} (oikos), ''[[house]]'' + (phobos), ''[[fear]]''
  • ecumenopoleis From {{etyl|el}} [[ecumen-]] ''[[entire]] [[inhabited]] [[world]]'' + [[-poleis]] ''[[cities]]''.
  • ecumenopolis Borrowed from Greek '''oecumenopolis''', meaning "world city." Coined by [[Greek]] [[city]] planner [[w:Constantinos Doxiadis|Constantinos Doxiadis]] in 1967.
  • ecumenopolises From {{etyl|el}} [[ecumen-]] ''[[entire]] [[inhabited]] [[world]]'' + [[-polis]] ''[[city]]'' + [[-es]] postsibilant pluralising suffix.
  • eisegesis Greek ''eis'', into + English ex''egesis''.
  • ekumenik From Greek ''[[oikoumenikos]]'' ([[worldwide]])
  • Elaine {{etyl|fro}} variant of [[Hélène]] , cognate to English [[Helen]], ultimately from {{etyl|grc}} . {{Celtic.}} origin has also been suggested since the name appears in [[Arthurian]] legend.
  • Electra complex With reference to [[w:Electra|Electra]] of Greek mythology, who killed her mother.
  • electrode The word was coined by the scientist Michael Faraday from the Greek words [[elektron]] (meaning [[amber]], from which the word electricity is derived) and [[hodos]], a way.
  • electrolysis Introduced by [[w:Faraday|Faraday]] on the suggestion of the Rev. [[w:William Whewell|William Whewell]], from [[electro-]] and {{etyl|el}} [[lysis]] "a loosening," from lyein "to loosen, set free". Originally of tumors, later (1909) of hair removal.
  • eleison {{etyl|el}} imperative
  • Elephas {{etyl|el}} (elephas), ''[[elephant]]''
  • Ellen Medieval English variant of [[Helen]], from {{etyl|grc}},possibly related to ''helios'', "sun"; also used as a variant of [[Eleanor]].
  • embryophagy {{etyl|la}} "embryo" + {{etyl|el}} "phagy" or to ''eat of'', 1948, word was created to describe the eating behavior of Sandtiger Shark embryos.
  • emesis Greek '''emein''', 'to vomit'
  • empyreal From Latin [[empyrius]], from Greek (''empyrios''), from (''em'') + (''pyr''), which means "in fire, fiery."
  • empyrean From {{etyl|la}} {{term|empyrius|lang=la}}, from {{etyl|grc}} {{term||tr=empyrios|lang=grc}}, from {{term||tr=em|lang=grc}} + {{term|tr=pyr|in fire, fiery|lang=grc}}. {{rfe|el or grc, provide original, check}} {{rfp}}
  • enano From {{etyl|la|es}} {{term|nanus|lang=la}} from {{etyl|grc|es}}
  • encephalopathy Derived from {{etyl|el}} ''enkephalopátheia'', from ''enkephalós'' meaning "brain" and ''pathós'' meaning "feeling" or "suffering".
  • encomiast {{etyl|el}} see [[encomium]]
  • encomiastic {{etyl|el}} see [[encomium]]
  • energumen {{etyl|el}} 'energumenos', see French ''energumene''
  • enhydros From {{etyl|grc}}.
  • ennead From [[Greek]] ''enneas'' which means ''from nine''.
  • enoptromancy {{etyl|grc}} ''enoptron'', "mirror".
  • entelechy {{etyl|grc}}: ''[[en]]'' “within,” + ''[[tele]]'' “goal, or end,” + ''[[chy]]'' “to have” (alt. ''[[kheia]]'')
  • enthuse First attested from [[w:1827|1827]]. {{back-form|enthusiasm|nodot=2}}, from {{etyl|el}} ''entheos'', inspired by a god, from ''en-'', in + ''theos'', god.
  • entomology From Greek ''entomos'' "[[incise]]d"; Compare ''[[insect]]''.
  • entomomancy {{etyl|grc}} ''entomos'', "insect".
  • eolith From {{etyl|el}} ''[[eos]]'', "dawn", and ''[[lithos]]'', "stone".
  • epeolatry From Greek epos (word) + -latry (worship). The first citation of the word is from Oliver Wendell Holmes, in his 1860 book ''Professor at the Breakfast Table''.<ref>Wordsmith.org</ref>
  • epiglottis from [[New Latin]], from [[Greek]] "epi-" on + "glottis"
  • epigram From {{etyl|la}} {{term|epigramma||lang=la}} < {{etyl|grc}} (''epigramma'') "inscription".
  • epikeia {{etyl|el}}
  • epimanikion {{etyl|el}} epi: upon + manikia:
  • Epimetheus From the Greek meaning "afterthought".
  • epiploic From Greek ''epiploon'' meaning [[omentum]].
  • epistome From the Greek, epi- upon + stoma- mouth
  • epistrophe From {{etyl|grc|la}}
  • epitafium From {{etyl|el|pl}}
  • eponymous From {{etyl|el}} ''[[eponymos]]''.
  • epornitic ''[[epi-]]'' + {{etyl|el}} [[ornis]] (bird)
  • Erato From the Greek meaning ''lovely''.
  • ergative From the {{etyl|el}}, [[ergatēs]], worker - deriving from [[ergon]], meaning work.
  • ergosphere {{etyl|el}} ''ergon'', "work".
  • Erinys Possibly ''the angry spirits'' from the Greek ''orinein'', (to raise, stir, excite [towards anger])
  • Eris From the Greek meaning ''strife''
  • eristic From the ancient Greek word meaning ''wrangle'' or ''strife''. See also [[Eris]].
  • eros {{etyl|el}} "love, sexual desire".
  • erotetic {{etyl|el}}
  • erysipelas {{etyl|el}} ''erisi''- red, and ''pelas'' skin
  • Esaias The New Testament {{etyl|grc}} form of {{etyl|he}} [[Isaiah]].
  • Esdras Greek from Hebrew ''Ezra''
  • esquire {{etyl|fro}} {{term|escuyer}}, {{term|escuier}}, properly, a shield-bearer, {{etyl|fr}} {{term|écuyer||shield-bearer, armor-bearer}}, ''(by [[apheresis]])'' {{term|||squire of a knight, esquire, equerry, rider, horseman}}, {{LL.}} {{term|scutarius||shield-bearer}}, from {{etyl|la}} {{term|scutum||shield}}, akin to Greek skin, hide, from a root meaning to cover; probably akin to English ''[[hide]]'' to cover. Compare ''[[equerry]]'', ''[[escutcheon]]''.
  • ethnophilia Greek, from [[ethnos]], people. See s(w)e- in Indo-European Roots. Origin: < Gk [[philía]] friendship, affinity; see [[-phile]], [[-ia]]
  • ethnoscape From {{etyl|grc}} ''[[ethno-]]'' (people) + ''[[-scape]]''
  • etho- *Greek [[ethos]]
  • eucalyptus {{etyl|el}} [[eu]] + ''[[kalyptos]]'' [[covered]] + ''[[kalyptein]]'' to [[conceal]].
  • Eucharis {{etyl|el}}
  • eudiometer Late 18th century, from Greek: ''eúdio(s)'' 'clear, fine', from ''eu'' 'well' + ''dios'' 'heavenly'
  • Euechinoidea From {{etyl|el}} [[eu-]] "true" + [[Echinoidea]]
  • eugenics Comes from Greek meaning "good breeding". Coined in 1883 by an English scientist, Francis Galton, who was cousin of Charles Darwin.
  • Eulalie {{etyl|fr}} form the saints' name [[Eulalia]], from {{etyl|grc}} "sweetly speaking".
  • Eumetazoa {{etyl|el}}
  • Eunice A biblical name from Late Greek ''eu'' "good" + ''nikē'' "victory". <ref>Patrick Hanks and Flavia Hodges: A Concise Dictionary of First Names. Oxford University Press 2001.</ref>
  • eupepsia prefix ''[[eu-]]'' ("good," "well," or "advantageous"); From {{etyl|el}}
  • euphenics {{etyl|el}} (eu), ''[[good]]'' + [[phenotype]]
  • Euphorbia From [[Greek]] ''[[Euphorbus]]'', a [[Trojan]] [[surgeon]] mentioned in the ''[[Iliad]]''.
  • Europa From [[Latin]] ''Europa'', from [[Greek]].
  • Euryarchaeota Greek [[eury]] broad + [[archae]] old + [[-otes]] quality
  • Eustace Olf French form of Late Greek ''Eustakhios'' "good "+ "grape", "fruitful".
  • eutectic {{etyl|el}} e'y`thktos easily melted; e'y^ well + th`kein to melt.
  • euthyroid Coined between 1920 and 1925 from Greek '[[eu]]' (good) + ''[[thyroid]]''.<ref>[http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/euthyroid Euthyroid in Dictionary.com]</ref>
  • eutripsia Greek.
  • evangelicalism From Greek '''evangel(ion)''', ‘gospel’ + adjectival ending + '''ism'''.
  • exoconsciousness From Greek {{term|exo||outside}} + {{term|consciousness}}: related to and inspired by the term {{term|exopolitics}}. The term was coined by Rebecca Hardcastle, Ph.D.
  • exonarthex Via Koine/Early Byzantine Greek.
  • exopolitics From Greek exo, outside, from ex, out of, and from Greek politika, from neuter plural of politikos political.
  • exoticus From {{etyl|grc|la}}
  • fancy '''Fancy''' arises in late Middle English as a contraction of ''[[fantasy]]''. From Old French and Early French ''fantasie'', itself from the {{ML.}} {{term|fantasia}}, {{LL.}} {{term|phantasia||an idea, notion, fancy, phantasm}}, which originated from the Greek ''phantazein'' (phan. to render visible). Related words include ''[[diaphanous]]'' (transparent), ''[[epiphany]]'' (manifestation). The noun ''fancy'' can usually still be replaced with the older word ''[[fantasy]]'' without any change of meaning.
  • Felipe From {{etyl|grc|es}}
  • felt {{etyl|ang}} ''felt''; akin to Dutch ''[[vilt]]'', German ''[[Filz]]'', and possibly to Greek hair or wool wrought into felt, Latin ''[[pilus]]'' hair, ''[[pileus]]'' a felt cap or hat.
  • feminine From {{etyl|fro}} [[féminin|feminin]], from {{etyl|la}} ''[[femininus]]'', from ''[[femina]]'' woman; probably akin to Latin ''[[fetus]]'', or to Greek to suck, to suckle, Sanskrit '''''dhā''''' to suck; compare Anglo-Saxon ''{{IPAchar|[[fǣmme]]}}'' woman, maid: compare French ''[[féminin]]''. See ''[[fetus]]''.
  • feretory Middle English, from Anglo-Norman ''fertre'', from Latin ''feretrum'', from Greek ''pheretron'' and ''pherein'' 'to carry'
  • film [[w:Old English|Old English]] '''filmen''', ''membrane, skin'' from [[w:West Germanic|West Germanic]] '''*filminjan''' (cf. [[w:Old Frisian|Old Frisian]] '''filmene''', ''skin'', Old English ''fell hide''), extended from Proto Germanic. '''*fello'''(m) ''animal hide'', from [[w:PIE|Proto-Indo-European]] '''*pello-/*pelno-''' (cf. [[w:Greek language|Greek]] '''[[pella]]''', [[w:Latin|Latin]] '''[[pellis]]''' ''skin''). Sense of ''a thin coat of something'' is 1577, extended by 1845 to the coating of chemical gel on photographic plates. By 1895 this also meant the coating plus the paper or celluloid.
  • fisarmonica {{etyl|el|it}} (phisan), ''to blow'' + {{term|armonica}}, ''feminine of'': {{term|armonico}}, ''harmonious''
  • flat From {{etyl|non}}<ref>[http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=flat Flat] in [[:w:Online Etymology Dictionary|Online Etymology Dictionary]]</ref> {{term|flatr}} (Danish {{term|flad}}), akin to German {{term|Flöz|tr=geological layer}}, Sanskrit {{term|प्रत्हस्|tr=extension}}<ref>[http://ordnet.dk/ods/opslag?opslag=flad&submit=S%F8g Sanskrit, OHG and Greek cognates named]</ref>.
  • flokati {{etyl|el}}
  • folosi {{etyl|el|ro}} ''[[ófelos]]''
  • folosire Greek ''[[ófelos]]''
  • for ever and ever “[[for]]” + “[[ever]]” + “[[and]]” + “[[ever]]”; arising in the [[King James Bible]], a literal translation from the [[Greek]] and [[Hebrew]].
  • forngríska From {{term|forn||ancient|lang=is}} + {{term|gríska||Greek|lang=is}}.
  • Francophone Altered and reinterpreted from {{etyl|fr}} {{term|Francophonie}}, with semantic influence from {{etyl|la}} {{term|Franco-||French}} + {{etyl|el}} {{term|-phonos||sound}}.
  • fraseologi From {{etyl|grc|no}}, {{term|frase||phrase|lang=no}} + {{term|-ologi||-ology}}
  • fry from Old French <i>frire</i>, from Latin <i>frigere</i> (to roast or fry), Greek <i>phrygein</i> (to roast, bake), from ProtoIndoEuropean <i>*bhreu-</i> (compare Sanskrit <i>bhrjjati</i> (roasts) <i>bharjanah</i> (roasting), German <i>Braten</i>) - ca. 1290
  • fungivorous ''fung- + -vor + -ous'', from ''fungus'', fungus + ''vorāre'', to swallow, devour. The Greek equivalent is [[mycophagous]], ''myc(o)- + phag- + -ous'', from Greek ''mukēs'', fungus + Greek ''phagein'', to eat.
  • galoshe From {{etyl|enm}} ''[[galoche]]'', ''[[galache]]'', ''[[galage]]'' (meaning [[shoe]]) < {{etyl|fro}} ''[[galoche]]'', perhaps altered from {{etyl|la}} ''[[gallica]]'' ( meaning a [[Gallic]] shoe), or from {{LL.}} ''[[calopedia]]'' (meaning [[wooden]] shoe, or shoe with a wooden [[sole]]) < {{etyl|el}} diminutive of ??????, a shoemaker's [[last]]; [[wood]] + [[foot]].
  • Ganymede {{etyl|el}} ...<!--provide the Greek here-->, rejoicing in his [[virility]], from ...<!--provide the Greek here--> (ganymai), I rejoice, I am glad, + ...<!--provide the Greek here--> (medea), counsels, cunning
  • gastritis From the [[Greek language|Greek]] {{term|gastro-}} meaning of the stomach and {{term|-itis}} meaning inflammation.
  • gastromancy {{etyl|grc}} ''gastro-'' stem from the {{etyl|grc}} ''gaster'', the [[belly]], and also the wide part of a bottle.
  • gastronomique From ''[[gastro-]]'', from the Ancient Greek word meaning stomach.
  • geloscopy Greek ''gelos'', [[laughter]].
  • genetics {{etyl|el}} (genesis), ''[[origin]]''
  • genitalia From Latin ''genitalia'', substantive use of plural of ''genitalis'' meaning "pertaining to generation or birth", from the Greek ''genete'', (birth).
  • genitive From Latin ''genitus'', the substantive form of ''genitalis'' meaning "pertaining to generation or birth", from the Greek ''genete'', (birth).
  • genomen From {{etyl|el}}
  • geografie From {{etyl|el}}, cognate with [[geography]]
  • geography From {{etyl|el}} {{term|geographia}} via {{etyl|la}} and {{etyl|fr}}, from {{term|geos||earth}} + {{term|graphia||[[-graphy]]}}
  • geomancy {{etyl|la}} ''[[geo-]]'' (Earth), + ''mancy'' (prophecy), Late {{etyl|el}} ''geomanteia''.
  • Gerobatrachus {{etyl|el}} (geros), ''[[aged]]'' + (batrachus), ''[[frog]]''
  • gerontocracy Greek
  • giga- From {{etyl|el}} ''gigas'', giant
  • gigametre Greek ''[[giga-]]'' giant + meter
  • gigas Greek ''gigas''
  • Giles Medieval English form Old French saints' name ''Gide'', an altered form of Latin [[Aegidius]], Greek ''Aigidios'', derivative of ''aigidion'' "kid, young goat". (Source:Patrick Hanks and Flavia Hodges: A Concise Dictionary of First Names. Oxford University Pres 2001.)
  • gimnazjum From {{etyl|el|pl}}
  • glaucoma Borrowed from Classical Greek ''glaukōma'', literally "an opacity of the crystalline lens", derived from ''glaukós'' "gray, silvery"
  • glossarium {{etyl|la}} from {{etyl|el}}
  • glycerin From {{etyl|fr}} {{term|glycérine|lang=fr}} < {{etyl|el}} {{term|||tr=glykeros|sweet|lang=el}}.
  • Glycymerididae From {{etyl|grc}} glykymeris (a word recorded in only one work, possibly from glykis (sweet) and meris (part))
  • gnostic {{etyl|fr|ro}} ''[[gnostique]]'', {{etyl|el|ro}} ''[[gnosis]]''
  • gobelin From {{etyl|fr|nl}} Parisian manufacturer Jean Gobelin's name, itself derived from {{etyl|de|nl}} Kobold 'goblin, evil gnome', derived from {{etyl|el|nl}} [[kobalos]] 'rogue'
  • gom From {{etyl|fr}} [[gomme]], from {{etyl|la}} [[gummi]] = [[cummi]], from {{etyl|el}} (''kommi''), itself from Pharaonic Egyptian
  • gondola {{etyl|vec}}, which likely derives from the [[w:Medieval Greek language|Medieval Greek language]] {{term|kontoura||small [[vessel]]}}
  • gone to the dogs Possibly related to an ancient Egyptian (possibly Persian and Middle Eastern also) belief that a pair of [[dog]]s - hounds of the Dark Goddess [[Hekat]] (Greek: [[Hecate]]) guarded the gates to the underworld. It is said that the body of [[King Henry VIII]] was taken to [[Syon House]] in [[Brentford]]. During the night the [[coffin]] popped open, and servants found dogs licking the remains. In Britain during times when bodies weren't buried or [[cremate]]d, it is known that bodies were fed to dogs.
  • graphic From {{etyl|la}} [[graphicus]], from {{etyl|el}} [[graphikos]].
  • graphology {{etyl|grc}} ''graphe'', "writing".
  • Grecophone ''[[Greek]]'' + ''[[-ophone]]''
  • Greek alphabet ''[[Greek]]'' + ''[[alphabet]]''
  • Greek house From the Greek letters used in the names of fraternities and sororities.
  • gregale From Italian [[grecale]], apparently representing a late Latin noun from [[Graecus]] ‘Greek’.
  • grimoire From {{etyl|fro}} {{term|grammaire|lang=fro}} < {{etyl|grc}} {{term|sc=polytonic|||tr=grammatikos|relating to letters|lang=grc}}. See also {{tern|grammar}}, {{term|glamour}}.
  • gringo * Originally in Spanish a ''gringo'' was a foreigner. It is believed to originate from ''[[griego]]'', particularly from the phrase {{term||hablar en griego|to speak in Greek}} (with a similar connotation to the English phrase {{term|it's all Greek to me|lang=en}}). In this regard, a ''gringo'' is simply someone who speaks an [[unintelligible]] language. There are many [[folk etymology|folk etymologies]] for this word involving American soldiers during the Mexican-American war. Some say it comes from “Green Grow” in either of the songs “Green Grow the Lilacs” or “O Green Grow the Rushes” sung by US troops. Some also put forth that it was from “Green go!” spoken by natives trying to send US troops home ("green" referring to the soldiers' uniform colors). To the contrary, the US troops actually used blue uniforms at the time, and there is much evidence the term was used before this war. * After the [[w:Mexican-American War|Mexican-American War]] and related tensions between the United States and Mexico, this term began to imply United States origin. However, in most of Latin America, it still simply means “foreigner”; it has been applied for example to Italians living in Argentina, or even Brazilians in Spanish speaking countries, or vice versa.
  • Gummi Latin ''[[cummi]]'', Greek ''[[kommi]]'', from Old Egyptian.
  • gymno- {{etyl|el}} (gymnos), ''[[naked]]''
  • gynaecology Deriving from two {{etyl|el}} words (gyne = woman, logy = study) that literally translate to as "woman study".
  • gynaeconitis {{etyl|el}}
  • gynephilia From the Greek words ''[[gynia]]'' (wife) and ''[[philos]]'' (affectionate love).
  • gyrate from Greek gyros (circle) through Latin into Middle English to English
  • gyromancy {{etyl|grc}} ''gyros'', a ring/circle/spiral.
  • gyroscopic Late Latin: ''gyrare'': to spin. Possibly from Greek ''guros'': a circle or ring + Greek ''skopeo'': to look at.
  • Görögország [[görög]] ([[Greek]]) + [[ország]] ([[country]])
  • hadal {{etyl|el}} (Haides), ''[[Hades]]''
  • hammochrysos Latin, from Greek; sand + ''chryso`s'' gold.
  • Haplorrhini {{etyl|grc|mul}} ''[[straight]]'' or ''[[dry]]'' + ''[[nose]]'' {{etystub|haplo should mean single, I thought}}
  • hebephilia From [[Greek]] ''[[Hebe]]'' young + ''-[[philia]]'' love or friendship
  • Hecate From the Greek ''[http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/ptext?doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.04.0057%3Aentry%3D%2331691 hekatos]'' (far-shooting), Hecate meaning "she who has power far off."
  • hecato- Greek ''hekato'' [[hundred]]
  • hectare {{etyl|fr}} ''hectare'', from {{etyl|el}} [[hect-]] + French [[are]].
  • hectometre [[Greek]] ''[[hecato]]'' hundred + [[metre]]
  • Hector {{etyl|grc}} ''hēktor'', possibly from ''ekhein'' "to restrain".
  • helepolis {{etyl|el}} ''taker of cities''
  • hemialgia {{term|hemi-}} + Greek {{term|algos}} (pain)
  • hemimegaloencephaly From {{etyl|el}} hemi (half) + megalo (big) + encephaly (condition of the brain).
  • hemorrhoid Via French from Latin ''haemorrhoidae''; from Greek '''haemo''', 'blood', '''rhein''', 'flow'; akin to [[hemorrhage]].
  • hemostat From {{etyl|la}} ''[[hemo-]]'' (from {{etyl|el}} ''[[haemo-]]''), "blood" ; + ''[[-stata]]'' <!-- not completely sure about this part -->, "standing"
  • hendecasyllabic From {{etyl|la}} hendecasyllabus, from {{etyl|el}} hendekasyllabos, from [[hendeca-]] (eleven), from hen, neuter of heis (one) + deka (ten), + syllabic.
  • henotic {{etyl|el}} (henotikos) serving to unite
  • hepatoscopy {{etyl|grc}} ''hepatoskopia'' < ''hepatos'', "liver" + ''skopeo'', "to examine".
  • heptagonal Since 16th century, from [[Greek]] [[heptagonon]], from [[hepta]] "[[seven]]" + [[gonia]] "[[angle]]".
  • heptameron From the {{etyl|el}} ''hepta'' (meaning 'seven') + "meron" (meaning 'day').
  • hermetic From the [[Greek]] [[god]] and mythological [[alchemist]] [[w:Hermes Trismegistus]], who was said to possess a [[magic]] ability to [[seal]] (with spells) treasure chests so that nothing could access their contents.
  • hermit From Greek, related to ''[[eremite]]''
  • heteroradical From the {{etyl|el}}: 'hetero', meaning to differ, and the {{etyl|la}} 'radix' for root.
  • heterosexuality From {{etyl|el}} ''hetero'', other + [[sexuality]]
  • Hexapoda {{etyl|el}} ''hexa'' six, New {{etyl|la}} ''poda'' foot
  • hexology From Greek ([[hex]]) [[six]] + [[-logia]] ([[-logy]])
  • hierarch Late Latin ''[[hierarcha]]'', Greek ; sacred (akin to Sanskrit ''[[ishiras]]'' vigorous, fresh, blooming) + leader, ruler, from to lead, rule: compare French ''[[hiérarque]]''
  • hieromancy {{etyl|grc}} ''hieros'', "holy, sacred" + [[-mancy]]
  • hierophant Greek [[hiero-]], 'holy' + 'phainein', 'to show'.
  • Hippocampus {{etyl|el}}
  • hippomancy {{etyl|el}} ''hippos'', "horse" + [[-mancy]].
  • Hippopotamus {{etyl|el}} ''hippos'', [[horse]]; ''potamos'', [[river]]
  • hippuric From {{etyl|el}} (hippos), ''[[horse]]'' + {{term|uric}}
  • holus-bolus The expression may have a {{etyl|el}} origin, from "Holós" meaning "all" and "Bolós" meaning "entire".
  • homalographic From the Greek ''homalos'' or ''homo'' (same) and ''graphos'' (write).
  • Homer Greek ''homēros'' "hostage".
  • homolographic From the Greek ''homalos'' or ''homo'' (same) and ''graphos'' (write).{{etystub}}"graphein", not "graphos" is to write; etymons should be in Greek script
  • homophone From [[Greek]] for ''same sound''.
  • homosexuality From Greek ''homo'', '''same''' + [[sexuality]], from Late Latin ''sexualitas'', '''sexuality''', state of being male or female
  • Homöopathie Coined in 1824 by German physician [[:w:Samuel Hahnemann|Samuel Hahnemann]], from {{etyl|el}} ''[[homoios]]'' "[[same]]" and ''[[patheia]]'' "[[pathos]]".
  • hora {{etyl|he}} {{term|hōrâ|lang=he}}, from {{etyl|ro}} {{term|horǎ|lang=ro}}, from {{etyl|tr}} {{term|hora|lang=tr}}, probably from {{etyl|el}} {{term|khoro|lang=el}} <ref>[http://www.bartleby.com/61/67/H0276700.html "hora."] The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition. 2008.</ref>
  • hyalophagy [[Greek]].
  • hyaluronic From {{etyl|el}} (hualos), ''[[glass]]'' + {{term|-uronic}}
  • hybrid Known in English since 1601 (but rare before c.1850 ), from {{etyl|la}} [[hybrida]], a variation of [[ibrid]]a 'mongrel, (specifically) offspring of a tame sow and a wild boar', of uncertain origin but probably related to {{etyl|el}} * (''hybris'') 'outrage'
  • hydatoscopy {{etyl|el}} ''hydatos''/''hydor'', "water" + ''skopeo'', "to examine".
  • hydrozoa {{etyl|el}} (hydor), ''[[water]]'' + (zoion), ''[[animal]]''
  • Hymenoptera {{etyl|el}} ([[hymen]]), ''[[membrane]]''
  • Hyperborea From Greek ''huperboreas''
  • hypercapnia {{etyl|el}} (hyper), ''[[above]]'' + (kapnos), ''[[smoke]]''
  • hypnagogic {{etyl|fr}} [[hypnagogique]] from {{etyl|el}} (hupnos), ''[[sleep]]''
  • hypnosis From {{etyl|el}} ''[[hypnos]]'' "sleep" + ''[[-osis]]''.
  • hypocaust Latin ''[[hypocaustum]]'', from Greek ''hypo'' "underneath" + ''kaiein'' "to light a fire, burn"
  • hypotrichosis From the Greek ''hyp(o)-'', (under), + ''tricho-'', (combining form of ''thrix'', meaning hair), + ''-osis'', (state or condition)
  • hysteria {{NL.}} from {{term|hysteric}} + {{term|-ia}} < {{etyl|el}}.
  • hystero- From {{etyl|grc}} ''hystera'' (womb)
  • ichnofossil {{etyl|el}} (ichnos), ''[[footprint]]'' + {{etyl|la}} [[fossilis]], ''dug up''
  • ichthyology Derived from Greek ''ichthyós'' "[[fish]]" + ''-logy'' (from ''logós'' "[[word]]")
  • ichthyomancy {{etyl|grc}} ''ichthyo-'' stem from ''ichthys'', a "fish".
  • iconographer Greek [[ikon]] + [[-graph]] + [[-er]]
  • iconotheca {{etyl|el}} ''[[picture]] [[repository]]''
  • icosahedron From {{etyl|el}} [[icosa-]] + [[-hedron]]
  • Ida Short form of obsolete names beginning with Germanic ''īd'' "work", used for both sexes in medieval England. It was revived in the 19th century, partly mistaken for a Greek name, for the Mount Ida of classical mythology. In continental Europe it has also been used as a pet form of [[Adelaide]].
  • idea Greek ''idéa'' from ''ideîn''
  • idiorhythmic From '''idio-''' + '''[[rhythmic]]''', from Ancient Greek
  • idolomancy {{LL.}} ''idolum'' < {{etyl|grc}} ''eidolon'', an "[[idol]]"/"false god".
  • Ignatius From {{etyl|grc|la}}
  • inion A Greek word meaning occipital bone or back of the head.
  • inotropic From the prefix ''[[ino-]]'' (pertaining to muscles), from Greek.
  • intradermal {{etyl|la}} [[intra-]], ''[[within]]'' + {{etyl|el}} (derma), ''[[skin]]''
  • iridic [[iridium|irid(ium)]] (Neo-Latin, itself from Latin [[iris]], from Greek iris) + [[-ic]] : hence cognate with Etymology 2
  • iridic From Latin [[irid-]], from iris, from Greek iris # {{medicine}} Of or relating to the [[iris]] of the eye.
  • Isidora Name of a fourth century saint. The feminine equivalent of [[Isidore]] , from {{etyl|grc}} "gift of [[Isis]]".
  • Isidore {{etyl|fr}} form of the name of early {{etyl|es}} saints, from {{etyl|grc}} ''Isidoros'' meaning "gift of (the goddess) [[Isis]]".
  • isobar From {{etyl|el}} [[iso-]] + [[baros]] ''weight''
  • isochronous From {{etyl|el}} '''iso''', ''[[same]]'' + '''chronous''', [[time]]
  • Italy From Italian [[Italia#Italian|Italia]] < {{etyl|la}} {{term|Italia|Ītalia|lang=la}}, via Greek from [[Oscan]] ''Víteliú'' (a name for the southwestern tip of the boot of Italy), meaning "land of bulls" in Oscan; usually assumed to be a cognate of {{term|vitulus||calf|lang=la}}, despite the different length of the ''i''.
  • Jason From the {{etyl|grc}} ''Iason'', from ''iasthai'', (to heal). The Jason mentioned in the New Testament (Acts 17:5-9, Romans 16:21 ) is probably a Greek rendering of [[Joshua]].
  • jaspis From {{etyl|he|no}} via {{etyl|grc|no}} and {{etyl|la|no}}
  • jeftin From {{etyl|el|bs}}.
  • jeftin From {{etyl|el|sr}}.
  • Joanna From the New Testament Greek feminine form of ''[[John]]''
  • Jorma Karelian form of {{term|Jeremias}} and of {{etyl|ru|fi}} {{term|Ермолай|tr=Jermolaj|sc=Cyrl}}, from {{etyl|grc|fi}} {{term||Hermolaos|god [[Hermes]] + people}}.
  • Julius Latin [[Iulius]], of uncertain origin, possibly from Greek ''ioulos'' 'wooly first beard hares', i.e. the young, or from Latin ''Jovilius'' 'devoted to [[Jove]]'.
  • kad Common Slavic from Greek
  • kadamitas From {{etyl|grc|la}}
  • kairine From the Greek ''[[kairos]]'' ("the right time").
  • kaliiperi From {{etyl|sv|fi}} or {{etyl|de|fi}}; ultimately from {{etyl|el|fi}} through {{etyl|ar|fi}} and {{ML.|fi}}.
  • Kamel From Greek ''kamelos'', from a Semitic root; compare Arabic ''gamal''.
  • kamin From Greek ''kaminos'' ([[furnace]]).
  • kanoon {{etyl|tr}} ''kanun'', from {{etyl|ar}} ''qānūn / arqānūn'', from {{etyl|el}} ''órganon''. {{wikipedia|Kanun (instrument)}}
  • kantarelli From {{etyl|el|fi}} through {{etyl|la|fi}}, {{etyl|fr|fi}}, and {{etyl|sv|fi}}.
  • kaput {{etyl|de}}  '''''[[kaputt]]''''', though more often rendered ''kaput'' in English; via {{etyl|yi}} {{term|קאַפּוט|sc=Hebr|tr=kaput||lost, dead}}. The same word is also borrowed into Albanian, Catalan, French, Greek, Spanish, Polish, Russian and Swedish, with approximately the same meaning.
  • karaat From the Greek word ''keration'' (fruit of the [[carob]] tree), which came into Dutch via Arabic and Italian. The seeds of such fruit were used in the ancient world as units for measuring weight.
  • katharometer {{etyl|grc}} {{term||sc=polytonic|tr=katharos||pure}} + METER
  • keelson 17th Century. Probably from Lower [[Greek]] ''[[kielswin]]'' (“keel [[swine]]”), ultimately of [[Scandinavian]] origin.
  • kefalotyri Greek ''kephalos'' head + ''tyros'' (MGk ''tyri'') cheese
  • Kefalovryssion {{etyl|el}} ''kefalos'' (“[[head]]”) and 'vrysi'' (“[[hose]]”)
  • keloid 19th Century, from {{etyl|el}} ''[[khēlē]]'': [[claw]].
  • keratoconus From {{etyl|el}} ''[[kerato]]'' (horn) + {{etyl|la}} ''[[conus]]'' (cone)
  • kindergraph German ''Kind'', child; and Greek ''graphikos'', picturesque.
  • kinesics * From Greek ''[[knsis]]'' (movement)
  • klám The word {{term|klám|lang=is}} is considered to be related to the Norse word {{term|klåmen||moist, glutinous, adhesive|lang=no}}. Compare the Greek words {{term|gláme|lang=el}}, {{term|glámon|lang=el}}, {{term|glamyrós|lang=el}} and the Lithuanian word {{term|glemes|lang=lt}}. The word {{term|klám|lang=is}} is also connected to the Low German word {{term|klam|lang=de}}.<ref>http://www.visindavefur.hi.is/svar.php?id=434</ref>
  • Krawall Ultimately from Late Latin from a Greek word meaning [[headache]], [[hangover]]
  • kreikankielinen {{term|kreikka||Greek}} + {{term|-kielinen||-language}}
  • krotoscope Greek: ''krotos'': handclapping + ''-scope''. First used in 1951.
  • Kuisma [[Karelian]] form of the {{etyl|ru|fi}} saint's name {{term|Кузьма|lang=ru}}, cognate to English [[Cosmo]], ultimately from {{etyl|grc|fi}}.
  • Kyra Name of a [[Greek Orthodox]] saint, from medieval Greek ''kyra'' "lady", or from [[Cyra]], feminine form of [[Cyrus]]. The English name may also be a variant of [[Keira]].
  • Kyrie eleison {{etyl|el}}
  • kyrie Contraction of the Greek phrase [[Kyrie eleison]], ''Lord, have mercy''
  • Kyrie {{etyl|el}} vocative
  • Lachesis Meaning ''destiny'', from the Greek ''lachein'', (to happen by [[lot]]).
  • lampadomancy Greek ''lampas'', a [[torch]].
  • larceny Coined between 1425 and 1475 from Anglo-Norman ''larcin'' ([[theft]]), from Latin ''latrōcinium'' ([[robbery]]), from ''latrō'' ([[robber]], [[mercenary]]), from Greek ''latron'' ([[pay]], [[hire]])<ref>[http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/larceny "Larceny" at Dictionary.com]</ref>
  • laudanum Coined by [[w:Paracelsus|Paracelsus]] for a tincture he made containing opium < {{NL.}} < {{etyl|la}} {{term|laudere||to praise|lang=la}}, or {{term|ladanum||a gum resin|lang=la}} < {{etyl|grc}} {{term|sc=polytonic|||tr=ladanon|lang=grc}}. Originally the same word as {{term|ladanum}}, {{term|ladbdanum}}, compare French {{term|laudanum|lang=fr}}, Italian {{term|laudano|lang=it}}, {{term|ladano|lang=it}}. See {{term|ladanum}}.
  • Lazarus From the New Testament Greek form of Old Testament [[Eleazar]], {{etyl|he}} "God is my help".
  • laïque From {{etyl|la}} [[laicus]] 'lay, layman', itself from {{etyl|el}} [[laikos]] 'of the people', from [[laos]] 'the people' (itself of unknown origin)
  • Leander {{etyl|grc}} "lion" + "man".
  • lecanomancy {{NL.}} ''lecanomantia'' < {{LL.}} ''lecanomantia'' < {{etyl|grc}} ''lekanomanteia'' < {{etyl|grc}} ''lekane'', a "dish", a "pan".
  • leili From {{OSw.|fi}} {{term|läghil}} ← {{etyl|la|fi}} ← {{etyl|el|fi}}; cf. Swedish {{term|lägel}}.
  • Lepidoptera Greek scaly + wing
  • lepidopterology [[Greek]]: lepis (a [[scale]]) + pteron (a [[wing]]) + logy ([[study]])
  • lethologica Letho- from the {{etyl|el}}, ''Lethes'', a river of Hades that effaced memories, and logica from the Greek word for word, ''logikos''.
  • leukophobia From {{etyl|el}} ''[[leuko]]'' (white) and [[phobia]] (fear of).
  • lexikon From Greek ''[[lexis]]'' (a [[word]])
  • lexis From {{etyl|grc}}, possibly via Latin.
  • libanomancy From Greek ''libanos'', [[frankincense]].
  • linoleic Greek word ''linon'' (flax) Oleic - of or relating to oil or oleic acid
  • Lissamphibia {{etyl|el}} (amphi), ''[[both]]'' + (bios), ''[[life]]''
  • liter From {{etyl|fr|no}} < {{ML.|no}} < {{etyl|grc|no}} {{term|litra}}
  • lithomancy Greek ''lithos'', meaning [[stone]].
  • lithosphere From [[w:Greek|Greek]] '''[[lithos]]''' ''stone'' + '''[[sphere]]''' ''globe, ball'' (sphaira)
  • lithotomy from Greek for "lithos" (stone) and "thomos" (cut)
  • logika From Latin '''[[logica]]''', from Greek '''[[logos]]''' (''[[word]]'')
  • logomancy {{etyl|el}} ''[[logos]]'', word + ''[[manteia]]'' oracle, divination
  • logorrhea From {{etyl|el}} ''[[logos]]'' meaning "word"
  • logorrhoea From {{etyl|el}} ''[[logos]]'' meaning "word"
  • Lois Name of the grandmother of Timothy in the New Testament,probably Greek, of obscure meaning.
  • Lone Shortened from [[Abellone]], a Danish form of [[Apollonia]], name of an early martyr, derived from the Greek god [[Apollo]].
  • lootus From {{etyl|el|fi}}, originally from a Semitic language.
  • Loxodonta {{etyl|el}} (loxos), [[oblique]] + {{etyl|la}} ''[[dens]]'', [[tooth]] <!-- needs Greek script -->
  • Luke English form of [[Lucas]], Latin from {{etyl|grc}} "man from Lucania".
  • LXX Greek, "the seventy".
  • Lycopodiaceae {{etyl|el}} ''[[wolf]] [[foot]]''
  • Lycopodiales {{etyl|el}} ''[[wolf]] [[foot]]''
  • Lycopodiopsida {{etyl|el}} ''[[wolf]] [[foot]]''
  • Lycopodium {{etyl|el}} ''[[wolf]] [[foot]]''
  • løve From {{etyl|grc|no}}, via {{etyl|la|no}}, {{LG.|no}}, {{etyl|de|no}}. Compare with ''Old Norse'' {{term|leó|lang=non}} / {{term|león|lang=non}}
  • Macedon Ancient Greek
  • macharomancy {{etyl|grc}} ''machaira'', a "dagger".
  • makaroni From {{etyl|sv|fi}} ''[[makaron]]'' < {{etyl|it|fi}} ''[[maccaroni]]'' < {{etyl|el|fi}}.
  • mangonel From {{etyl|fro}} ''[[mangonel]]'', from {{etyl|la}} ''[[manganellus]]'', ''[[manganum]]'', from {{etyl|el}}.
  • margarine # From the surname of its inventor [[w:Hippolyte Mège-Mouriés|Hippolyte Mège-Mouriés]]. # From [[margaric acid]] from {{etyl|el}} (margaron), ''[[pearl]]''.
  • Marguerite {{etyl|fr}} equivalent of [[Margaret]], ultimately from Greek "[[pearl]]". The name has also been adopted for a cultivated [[daisy]].
  • marsupium Latin [[marsupium]], from Greek ''marsypion'', diminutive of ''marsypos'' "pouch," perhaps of oriental origin.
  • masseter New Latin, from Greek, a chewer, a muscle of the lower jaw used in chewing, from to chew: compare French ''[[masséter]]''
  • mastigophoric {{etyl|el}}
  • mastitis From {{etyl|el}} [[mastos]], "breast" + [[-itis]].
  • masto- From {{etyl|el}} [[mastos]], "breast".
  • Mastodon Coined by [[w:Georges Cuvier|Georges Cuvier]], from {{etyl|el}} [[mastos]], "breast" + [[-dont]], "tooth," from the similarity of the [[nipple-like]] [[projection]]s on the [[crown]]s of the [[extinct]] mammal's [[molar]]s.
  • mater From {{proto|Indo-European|méh₂tēr}}. Cognates include {{proto|Slavic|mati|title=Common Slavic}} (thence Russian {{term|sc=Cyrl|мать|tr=mat’}}), Persian {{term|sc=fa-Arab|مادر|tr=madar|lang=fa}}, [[Mycenaean]] Greek {{term|𐀔𐀳𐀩|sc=Linb|tr=ma-te-re|lang=gmy}}, and Sanskrit {{term|मातृ|sc=Deva|tr=mātṛ|lang=sa}}.
  • mausoleum From Middle English ''mausoleum'' < Latin '''''[[mausōlēum]]''''' < Greek '''''[[mausōleion]]''''' < Greek '''''[[mausōlos]]'''''; names for [[w:Mausolus|Mausolus]], [[satrap]] of the Persian empire and ruler of [[Caria]] {{wikipedia}}
  • Maxwell's demon {{wikipedia}} Named after [[physicist]] [[w:James Clerk Maxwell]] and [[demon]], and probably from Greek [[daemon]], a mythological being intermediate between gods and men.
  • mechanism From {{etyl|la}} '''''[[mechanismus]]''''' < Greek '''''[[mekhane]]''''', "machine"
  • mega- From {{etyl|el}} ''megas'', big
  • megalith From Greek.
  • megalo- From {{etyl|el}}.
  • megalopoleis From {{etyl|el}} [[megalo-]] ''[[great]]'' + [[-poleis]] ''[[cities]]''.
  • megalopolis From {{etyl|el}} [[megalo-]] ''[[great]]'' + [[-polis]] ''[[city]]''.
  • megalopolises From {{etyl|el}} [[megalo-]] ''[[great]]'' + [[-polis]] ''[[city]]'' + [[-es]] postsibilant pluralising suffix.
  • megametre [[Greek]] ''[[mega-]]'' large + metre
  • megapoleis From {{etyl|el}} [[mega-]] ''[[large]]'' + [[-poleis]] ''[[cities]]''.
  • megapolis From {{etyl|el}} [[mega-]] ''[[large]]'' + [[-polis]] ''[[city]]''.
  • megapolises From {{etyl|el}} [[mega-]] ''[[large]]'' + [[-polis]] ''[[city]]'' + [[-es]] postsibilant pluralising suffix.
  • megathere From {{etyl|grc}} {{term|mega||large}} + {{term|therion||wild beast}}.
  • megatsunami From the Greek prefix '''[[mega-]]''' "large", plus Japanese [[津波]] / [[津浪]] (つなみ, tsunami), "harbour wave"
  • mellan From Greek
  • Melpomene From the Greek ''melpesthai'', (to sing)
  • menaion From {{NL.}}, from {{etyl|el}} ("monthly").
  • mesencephalon *Latin from Greek ''[[mesos]]'' [[inner]]'' and ''[[encephalos]]'' [[cephalon]], [[brain]] literally midbrain
  • mesencéfalo Latin From Greek ''[[mesos]]'' [[inner]] and ''[[encephalos]]'' [[cephalon]], [[brain]]
  • metallum From {{etyl|grc|la}}
  • metallurgie From {{etyl|fr}} [[métallurgie]], itself from {{etyl|el}} metallon 'metal' + ergon 'work'
  • metamorphic From {{etyl|la}} [[metamorphosis#Latin|metamorphōsis]], ultimately from {{etyl|el}} ''[[meta-]]''+ (morphos) 'form'.
  • metencephalon Greek ''meta'', after, beyond, over + ''enkephalos'', brain.
  • meteorology From the Ancient Greek ''metéōros'' (high in the sky) + {{term|-logy|lang=en}} (study), meaning "the study of the sky".
  • meteoromancy {{etyl|grc}} {{term|||tr=meteoros|aerial phenomena|lang=grc}} (e.g {{term|meteor|meteors}}, {{term|comet|comets}})
  • metodi From {{etyl|sv|fi}} {{term|metod}} ← {{etyl|la|sv}} {{term|methodus}} ← {{etyl|el|fi}}.
  • mezo Italian ''[[mezzo]]'' and Greek
  • mia {{etyl|el}}
  • miasmas Greek
  • microcline From the Greek ''mikron'' - "little" and klinein - "to stoop."
  • micrometre Greek ''[[micro-]]'' + [[metre]]
  • micron {{NL.}}, from {{etyl|el}} {{term|||small|lang=el}}.
  • microscope From {{etyl|el}} ''mikros'', small, and ''skopein'', to look at.
  • Microsoftian Greek Mikros [[small]] and Modern English [[Software]] + ''[[-ian]]''
  • migraine From {{LL.|fr}} ''[[hemicrania]]'', from {{etyl|el}} ''[[hemikrania]]''.
  • militair From Medieval French '''[[militaire]]''', from [[w:Latin|Latin]] '''[[militaris]]''' ''of soldiers or war'', from '''[[miles]]''' (genitive ''militis'') ''soldier'', perhaps ultimately from [[Etruscan]], or else meaning ''one who marches in a troop'', and thus connected to Sanskrit '''[[melah]]''' ''assembly'' Greek '''[[homilos]]''' ''assembled crowd, throng''.
  • mimeograph {{wikipedia}} Coined by [[w: Albert Blake Dick|A.B. Dick]] in 1889 and originally a trade name.<br> Greek ''mimos'', combining form ''mimeo'' + [[-graph]]
  • mimesis From Greek ''mīmēsis'', from ''mīmeisthai'' "to [[imitate]]", from ''mīmos'' "[[mime]]".
  • mina {{etyl|la}} < {{etyl|grc}}
  • mint [[Image:Mint.jpg|thumb|right|A mint plant.]] From {{etyl|la}} {{term|menta||the plant}} < {{etyl|grc}} mythological figure (Minthe), akin to Old Norse {{term|minta||mint|lang=non}}.
  • minyas From {{etyl|grc|la}}
  • Moira From the Greek meaning ''fate'', from ''moros'', (fate, destiny, doom, lot) from ''meiresthai'', (to receive one's share).
  • Moirae Plural form of ''moira'' from the Greek meaning "fate", from ''moros'', (fate, destiny, doom, lot) from ''meiresthai'', (to receive one's share).
  • Molossia {{etyl|grc}}
  • momist From [[Momus]], the {{etyl|el}} god of ridicule
  • monarchia From {{etyl|el|pl}}
  • Monera Greek - ''moneres'' single, solitary
  • Monica Name of the mother of St. Augustine, of uncertain origin and meaning; suggestions include Greek ''monos'' "alone" and Latin ''monere'' "to advise"...
  • monism The word was coined by German philosopher [[w:Baron Christian von Wolff|Baron Christian von Wolff]] and first used in English in [[w:1862|1862]], from [[Modern Latin]] [[monismus]], from [[Greek]] [[monos]] ''alone''.
  • monochromatic {{etyl|el}} ''One colour''.
  • monologue From {{etyl|grc|en}} (mono) ''[[single]]'' + (logos) ''[[tongue]]'' {{rfe|lang=Ancient Greek}}
  • monomorphic From the Greek roots [[mono-]], "one," and [[-morphic]] "of a form."
  • mononym From Greek ''[[mono-]]'' (one) and ''[[-onym]]'' (word, name)
  • Monotremata {{etyl|el}} (mono), ''[[one]]'' + (trema), ''[[perforation]]''
  • morphine From {{etyl|grc}} ''[[w:Morpheus (mythology)|Morpheus]]'' the god of [[dream]]s.
  • musaka {{etyl|el|fi}}
  • Muskat From Old French ''[[noix]] [[muscat]]'', from Middle Latin ''muscata'' "nutmeg", from Greek ''moschos'' "[[musk]]". Here is the real explanation... Nuss is to Nuesse as Muss is to Muesse. Cata means something else entirely. Look at Muscat, Oman.
  • mycophagous ''myc(o)- + phag- + -ous'', from Greek ''mukēs'', fungus + Greek ''phagein'', to eat. The Latin equivalent is [[fungivorous]], from fung- + -vor + -ous, from ''fungus'', fungus + ''vorāre'', to swallow, devour.
  • myctophid From {{etyl|el}} '''mykter''' "nose" + '''ophis''' "serpent".
  • myologic From [[Greek]] ''[[myo-]]'' "muscle" and ''[[-logy]]'' "study (of)".
  • myomancy {{etyl|grc}} ''mys'', "mouse".
  • Myriapoda {{etyl|el}} ''[[many]] [[foot]]ed''
  • myrmecology From [[Greek]] ''[[myrmeco-]]'' "ant" and ''[[-logy]]'' "study (of)".
  • myrmomancy {{etyl|grc}} ''murmekes'', "ants".
  • mysteriosophy From Greek ''mysterion'', mystery, and ''sophy'', knowledge or wisdom.
  • mystiikka From {{etyl|sv|fi}} {{term|mystik}} ← {{etyl|la|fi}} {{term|mystica}} ← {{term|mysticus}} ← {{etyl|el|fi}}.
  • Myxini {{etyl|el}} (myx), ''[[slime]]''
  • myxo- {{etyl|la}} from {{etyl|el}} ''[[muxa]]''
  • naos {{etyl|el}}
  • narcissism After ''[[Narcissus]]'', the fictional Greek hero who became obsessed with his own reflection.
  • nautilus Latin < Greek ''[[nautilos]]'' (nautilus, sailor).
  • neanderthal From the name of the German valley where [[w:Neanderthal 1|Neanderthal 1]] was discovered in 1856. The ''Düsseltal'' (from {{etyl|de}} ''[[w:Düssel|Düssel]]'', a small [[tributary]] of the [[w:Rhine|River Rhine]] + ''[[tal]]'', “valley”) itself was renamed (from ''Das Gesteins'' (“The Rockiness”) and/or ''Das Hundsklipp'' (“The Cliff of Dogs”)) in the early 19<sup>th</sup> century to ''Neandershöhle'' (“Neander’s Hollow”), and again in 1850 to [[w:Neanderthal, Germany|''Neanderthal'']] (“Neander Valley”); both names were in honour of the German [[Calvinist]] [[theologian]] and [[hymn]] writer [[w:Joachim Neander|Joachim Neander]] (1650–1680). The [[surname]] ''Neander'' is the {{etyl|el}} translation of the original {{etyl|de}} surname ''Neumann'' (“New man”), for which reason ''Homo neanderthalensis'' is sometimes called ''New man'' in English.
  • nebris {{etyl|el}} (nebro), ''a [[fawn]]''
  • necropoleis From {{etyl|el}} [[necro-]] ''[[dead]], [[death]]'' + [[-poleis]] ''[[cities]]''.
  • necropolises From {{etyl|el}} [[necro-]] ''[[dead]], [[death]]'' + [[-polis]] ''[[city]]'' + [[-es]] postsibilant pluralising suffix.
  • necyomancy {{etyl|grc}} ''nekys'', "corpse" and ''manteia'', "divination".
  • Nematoda {{etyl|el}} (nema), ''[[thread]]''
  • nemesis From the Greek goddess Nemesis, from ''némein'' (to [[allot]]) and [[-sis]]<ref>[http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/nemesis "Nemesis" at Dictionary.com]</ref>
  • Neofelis nebulosa {{etyl|el}} {{term|neo||new}} + {{etyl|la}} {{term|feles||cat}} + {{term|nebulosa||cloudy, misty}}
  • Neofelis {{etyl|el}} {{term|neo||new}} + {{etyl|la}} {{term|feles||cat}}.
  • nephelococcygia The word comes from the play ''The Birds'' by the Greek playwright [[w:Aristophanes|Aristophanes]].
  • Nestor {{etyl|grc}} ''Nestor'', possibly from ''neisthai'' "to return safely", ''nostos'' "homecoming" .
  • neuroleptic From {{etyl|el}} ''neuro'' refers to the nerves and ''lept'' means "to take hold of".
  • neurula {{NL.}}, diminutive of {{etyl|grc}}, a nerve
  • Nikita A {{etyl|ru}} male given name, [[Никита]], fom {{etyl|grc}} saints' name ''[[Aniketos]]'' "unconquerable", made known in the West by [[w:Nikita Khrushchev|Nikita Khrushchev]], Soviet Union leader in 1953-1964. It was understood as a form of [[Nicholas]] and taken up as a girls' name first in French and then in English.
  • nominoaccusative From Greek prefix ''[[nomino-]]'' "nominative" + [[accusative]]
  • nomological Greek ''nomos'' law + [[-logical]]
  • nomology From {{etyl|grc|en}} {{term|||tr=nomos|lang=grc|law}} + {{term|-logy||lang=en}}
  • nomothetic Greek {{rfe}}
  • nona- From {{etyl|la}} ''[[nonus]]'' "ninth". ''Nona-'' is unique in that all other technical [[numerical prefixes]] used for [[systematic name|systematic names]], such as mono-, are derived from Greek.
  • Nyx From the Greek meaning ''night''.
  • o- From the Proto-Indo-European negative prefix *''[[n̥-]]'' whence also eg. the Greek ''[[a-]]'' and English ''[[un-]]''.
  • obolus {{etyl|el}} obolos (''thin metal rod'')
  • ochlarchy From the Greek root word for "[[mob rule]]".
  • ochlophobia From the {{etyl|el}} ''[[ochlos]]'', [[crowd]], and ''[[phobos]]'', [[fear]].
  • octopi * By analogy with English plurals of [[Appendix:Latin second declension|Latin second declension]] nouns, notwithstanding that ''octopus'' is Greek in origin.
  • oecus {{etyl|la}} from {{etyl|el}} (oikos), ''[[house]]''
  • Oedipus complex Named after [[Oedipus]] in Greek Mythology, who unwittingly killed his father and married his mother.
  • oenophile Greek ''[[oinos]]'' meaning wine + Greek ''[[philos]]'' meaning loving.
  • ogórek From Greek
  • oikumene From Greek.
  • oke {{etyl|tr}} ''[[okkah]]'', from {{etyl|ar}} ?k?yah, wak?yah, probably from {{etyl|el}} an ounce, from {{etyl|la}} ''[[uncia]]''.
  • Olympias from {{etyl|grc}}
  • omega From [[Middle English]], from {{etyl|el}} ''o'' "o" + ''mega'' "[[large]]" (omega is a [[long vowel]] in Ancient Greek).
  • oneiromancy Greek ''oneiro'' (dream), ''[[Oneiros]]'' (god of dreams) + [[-mancy]]
  • oneironaut From Greek ''oneiros'' dream
  • ontogenéza From {{etyl|el|sk}} {{term|onto-||being}} + {{term|genesis||arising}}.
  • oophagy {{etyl|el}} "oo" or ''egg'' + "phagy" or to ''eat of''.
  • Ophelia {{etyl|it}} [[Ofelia]], coined by the poet Jacopo Sannazzaro in his poem ''Arcadia'' (1504), presumably from {{etyl|grc}} ''ophelos'' "help". Used by [[Shakespeare]] for the ill fated bride of ''[[Hamlet]]''.
  • Ophiuchus From {{etyl|la}} < {{etyl|grc}} "serpent handler"
  • oraş {{etyl|hu|ro}} ''[[város]]'' or [[Greek]] ''baros''
  • oread Greek
  • orgasmic From {{etyl|grc}}. The historically correct form is '''orgastic'''. Ancient Greek regularly formed nouns ending in ''-sm'', and related adjectives ending in ''-stic''; e.g. ''enthususiasm''/''enthusiastic'', ''sarcasm''/''sarcastic''. The ahistorical ''-mic'' also appears in the etymologically incorrect terms ''protoplasmic'' and ''cataclysmic'' (instead of '''protoplastic''' and '''cataclystic''').
  • orphic Comes from the name 'Orpheus'a character in Greek mythology. He was a great musician who went to Hades to get his wife Eurydice back after she died, but he failed.
  • orthoclase ortho (from Greek orthos, straight, perpendicular) + clase (from Greek klastos, broken, to break).
  • orthodox From {{LL.}} [[orthodoxus]], from {{etyl|el}} ''[[orthodoxos]]'', from ''[[orthos]]'' + ''[[doxa]]''.
  • orthodoxia {{etyl|el}}
  • orthomorphic From the Greek ''orthos'' (straight) + ''morphē'' (shape).
  • Orthonectida Greek ?
  • ostensible {{etyl|fr}}, from {{etyl|la}} ''[[ostensus]]'', past participle of ''[[ostendere]]'' to show, from ''[[obs-]]'' in front of; akin to ''[[ob-]]'' in the way; akin to Greek ''[[epi]]'' on, at, besides, after; akin to Old English ''[[eofot]]'' crime + ''[[tendere]]'' to stretch, Greek ''[[teinein]]''
  • ostracise {{etyl|el}} (ostrakon) ''[[potsherd]]'' used for voting
  • otic (17th C) from Greek ''[[ōtikos]]'' ("of the [[ear]]") from ''[[ous]]'' ("ear").
  • ounce Via French ''once'', ''lonce'', by false division (the ''l'' was thought to be the article), from Latin ''lynx'', from {{etyl|el}} (lunx), lynx. Interestingly, the taxon of the snow leopard is a Latinisation using the root of ounce (1).
  • ouroboros Greek: ''ouroboros'' [[tail]]-[[eater]]
  • Outi [[Karelian]] form of the {{etyl|ru|fi}} saint's name {{term|Евдокия|lang=ru}}, ultimately from {{etyl|grc|fi}} ''Eudokia'' "well disposed".
  • oximoronically Greek ''oxumoron'', from neuter of oxumoros, pointedly foolish : ''oxus'', sharp; see oxygen + ''moros'', foolish, dull
  • paida Akin to Old High German ''[[pheit]]''. These words were borrowed either from Finnish ''[[paita]]'' or from Greek.
  • paita Maybe from a {{Ger.|fi}} language, compare Old High German {{term|pheit}} and Gothic {{term|paida}}. Alternatively, the Finnish word existed earlier and Gothic borrowed the word from Finnish. The second opinion is weakened by the fact that a similar word exists in Greek.
  • palaeontography Greek ''palaios'' meaning old + Greek ''ōn'', ''ont'' meaning to be + Greek ''graphiā'' meaning the representation of.
  • paleologism Derived from Greek ''paleós'', meaning "old", and patterned after {{en-term|neologism}}.
  • paleontology From the Ancient Greek {{term|paleo-|lang=en}} (old) + {{term|onto-|lang=en}} (of being) + {{term|-logy|lang=en}} (study), meaning "the study of ancient life".
  • palinode From {{etyl|grc|en}} {{term|||lang=grc|tr=palinoidia}}, from {{term|||lang=grc|tr=palin|again}} + {{term|||tr=oide|lang=gr|song}}.
  • Pamela Invented by Sir Philip Sidney for his pastoral poem ''Arcadia'' ( ca.1593). {{etyl|el}} ''pan-melos'' "all honey" has been suggested as an explanation.
  • Pan troglodytes {{etyl|el}}
  • panopticon From {{etyl|grc}} "-opticon" for "[[observe]]" and "[[pan-]]" for "all".
  • panpipes From [[Pan]] (Greek god of nature, often visualized as half goat and half man) + [[pipes]].
  • pansexuality From {{etyl|el}}. {{term|pan-}} + {{term|sexuality|lang=en}}
  • pansophy Originally from Greek ''pan'', all, and ''-sophy'', wisdom or knowledge, then from Latin ''pansophia'' to English.
  • Pantheon {{etyl|el}} ''pantheion'', a shrine to all the gods.
  • pantothenic acid Circa 20th century, from {{etyl|el}} {{term|||tr=pantothen|from every side|lang=el}}.
  • pantothenic Circa 20th century, from {{etyl|el}} {{term|||tr=pantothen|from every side|lang=el}}.
  • papaphilia {{etyl|la}}; '''papa'''—''pope'' + {{etyl|el}}; '''filein'''—''love''
  • papaphobia {{etyl|la}}; '''papa'''—''pope'' + {{etyl|el}}; '''phobia'''—''fear''
  • pappagallo From the [[w:Byzantine Greek|Byzantine Greek]] ''[[papagâs]]'', from the [[:wikipedia:Arabic language|Arabic]] ''[[babagha]]'', of onomatopoeic origin.
  • paracme {{etyl|el}} => [[para-]] + [[acme]]
  • paragrafo {{etyl|el}} (paragraphos), ''short stroke in the margin''
  • paraphilia From {{etyl|el}} ''[[para-]]'', "abnormal" + ''[[philia]]'', "love"
  • parapodium From the Greek: para, beyond or beside + podia, feet
  • Parazoa Greek ?
  • parousia {{etyl|el}} ''[[presence]]''
  • pat From Greek
  • pataphysics {{etyl|fr}} [[pataphysique]], from {{etyl|el}} (ta epi ta metaphusika), alteration of a work by Aristotle
  • pathogenic {{etyl|el}} [[patho-]] wrong + [[-genic]] able to create.
  • pathologic From {{etyl|el}} ''pathologikos''.
  • patriarchate Greek [[-patros]] + [[-archy]]
  • pelikaani From {{etyl|sv|fi}} {{term|pelikan}}, ultimately from {{etyl|el|fi}} through {{etyl|la|fi}}.
  • peloro- {{etyl|la}} [[Pelorus]]. Derived from the Greek for ‘monster’.
  • pemphigus Greek ''pemphix'', pustule
  • Penelope From {{etyl|grc}}, possibly from ''penelops'' "duck".<ref>*Patrick Hanks and Flavia Hodges: A Concise Dictionary of First Names. Oxford University Press 2001.</ref>
  • pentaculum Possibly {{ML.}} < {{etyl|grc}}.
  • Pentagramm from Greek [[pentagrammon]], [[penta]] "[[five]]" and [[-gram]] "[[written]]", five-lined, having five lines.
  • pentamerous {{etyl|el}} ''penta-'' five; ''meros'' part
  • penteconter {{etyl|el}}, from fifty
  • Pentium * '''[[pent-]]''', from the Greek for '''[[five]]''' (the first Pentium processor being the fifth-generation processor of the [[w:x86|x86 architecture]]) + '''[[-ium]]'''
  • peplos From {{etyl|grc}}.
  • Perciformes {{etyl|el}} (perke), [[perch]] + {{etyl|la}} ''[[forma]]'', [[shape]]
  • peri- From {{etyl|el}} ''[[peri]]'' "about, around".
  • periphrastic From {{etyl|grc}} {{term||tr=periphrasis|lang=grc}}. Cognate to French {{term|périphrastique|lang=fr}}. {{rfe|he or grc?, Greek script}}
  • peta- Said to be from {{etyl|el}} ''penta'' (five) with the middle letter removed, as if the previously coined prefix [[tera-]] had been formed in the same way from Greek ''tetra'' (four).
  • Petromyzontida {{etyl|la}} [[petra]], ''[[stone]]'' + {{etyl|el}} (myzo), ''to [[suckle]]'' + (odontos), ''[[teeth]]
  • Petromyzontiformes {{etyl|la}} [[petra]], ''[[stone]]'' + {{etyl|el}} (myzo), ''to [[suckle]]'' + (odontos), ''[[teeth]]
  • Petroselinum {{etyl|el}} (petros), ''[[rock]]'' + (selinon), ''[[celery]]''
  • petrous From the Greek [[petra]], rock.
  • Phaedriades From Greek.
  • phantasmophobia From Latin, from Greekk ''[[phantasmoophobia]]'' literally "fear of ghosts", from ''[[phantasma]]'' "ghost" + ''[[phobos]]'' "fear".
  • pharmacosiderite Greek ''farmakon'', poison (i.e. arsenic), and ''sideros'', iron.
  • pharynx Via {{NL.}} from {{etyl|el}}.
  • Phasianidae {{etyl|el}} (phasionas), ''[[pheasant]]''
  • Phasianinae {{etyl|el}} (phasianos), ''[[pheasant]]''
  • phero- From {{etyl|el}} (phein) ''[[carry]]''
  • phial {{etyl|fro}} {{term|fiole|lang=fro}} < {{etyl|la}} {{term|phiala|lang=la||a broad, flat, shallow cup or bowl}} < {{etyl|grc}}. Confer {{term|vial}}.
  • Phil Shortened from [[Philip]], a Biblical name from {{etyl|grc}} .
  • philanthropist Greek; loving + man: French ''philanthrope''.
  • philanthropy From {{LL.}} ''[[philanthropia]]'', from {{etyl|grc}}.
  • phonics {{etyl|el}}
  • phosphophyllite ''[[phosphate]]'', ''[[phyllon]]'' (Greek for ''leaf'', in reference to its cleavage), and ''[[-ite]]''.
  • Phyllis {{etyl|el}} ''[[foliage]]''
  • phyllode Latin phyllodium, Greek phullodes - resembling a leaf
  • physio- {{etyl|el}} (physis), physical
  • physiophilosophy From Greek ''physi-'' or ''physio-'', meaning "nature", and [[philosophy]].
  • physiosophy From Greek ''physio-'' or ''physi-'' (nature), and ''-sophy'', knowledge or wisdom.
  • phytometrics From {{etyl|grc}} (phyto) "plant" + (metron) "measure"
  • pii From {{etyl|el|fi}}.
  • pitta bread {{etyl|el}}
  • plagioclase plageo, Greek "oblique" + klao, Greek "I cleave"
  • Platonic solid Named after the Greek [[philosopher]] [[w:Plato|Plato]], who wrote about these solids in his treatise ''Timaeus''.
  • plectics {{etyl|el}} (plektos), ''[[braided]]'', but invented by [[w:Murray Gell-Mann|Murray Gell-Mann]]
  • plenoptic {{etyl|la}} [[plenus]], ''[[full]]'' + {{etyl|el}} (optikos), ''of [[sight]]''
  • plesiochronous From Greek '''plesio''', ''[[near]]'' + '''chronous''', [[time]]
  • pneumatic From {{etyl|la}} ''[[pneumaticus]]'', from {{etyl|el}} ''[[pneumatikos]]''.
  • polemology {{etyl|el}} (polemos), ''[[war]]''
  • politicaster From {{etyl|it}} [[politicastro]], from {{etyl|la}} [[politicus]] (political), from {{etyl|el}} (politikos), from polites (citizen), from polis (city) + Latin -aster (pejorative suffix).
  • polyamorous The term dates from the 1960s or earlier, a hybrid of the Greek [[poly]] for [[many]] and the Latin [[amor]] for [[love]].
  • polyamory The term dates from the 1960s or earlier, a hybrid of the Greek [[poly]] for [[many]] and the Latin [[amor]] for [[love]].
  • polyandrion {{etyl|el}}
  • polyandrum {{etyl|el}}
  • polydipsia New Latin, from Greek much + thirst.
  • polyeidic [[poly-]] + Greek [[form]]
  • polygamy {{etyl|el}}; compare French {{term|polygamie}}.
  • polygoneutic [[Poly-]] + Greek offspring
  • polygonum New Latin, from Greek a kind of plant; many + the knee, a joint of a plant. So called in allusion to the numerous joints
  • polygyny [[Poly-]] + Greek: woman, wife
  • polyhistori From Greek, see: [[polyhistor#Etymology|polyhistor]]
  • Polyhymnia From the Greek ''poly'', (many) + ''hymn(os)'', (song in praise of gods) + ''-ia'', (common feminine ending)
  • polymorphism From {{etyl|grc}} ''[[poly]]'' (''many'') + ''[[morph]]'' (''form'') + ''[[-ism]]''.
  • Polyplacophora {{etyl|la}} [[poly-]] + {{etyl|el}} (''tablet'') + [[-phorous]]
  • pomp Probably a [[loan word]] from the {{etyl|da|is}} {{term|pomp|lang=da}}, from the {{etyl|fr|is}} {{term|pompe|lang=fr}}, from the {{etyl|la|is}} {{term|pompa||display, parade, procession|lang=la}} from the {{etyl|el|is}} {{term|pompe||a sending|lang=el}}.
  • Pontus Brought to Sweden by the French soldier Pontus De La Gardie (~1520-1585), originally [[Ponce]], from the saint's name [[Pontius]], Latin "an inhabitant of [[#English|Pontus]]", ultimately from Ancient Greek ''pontos'' "sea".
  • pope From Old Church Slavonic {{Cyrl|'''[[попъ]]'''}} ( > Russian {{Cyrl|'''[[поп]]'''}}, Polish ''[[pop#Polish|pop]]''), from Gothic '''[[𐍀𐌰𐍀𐌰]]''' ‘priest’, from Byzantine Greek as Etymology 1, above.
  • Portugália [[portugál]] ([[portuguese]]) + Latin and Greek '''-ia''' suffix forming names of countries.
  • potkan From Greek
  • presbyopia From {{NL.}}, from {{etyl|el}} ''[[presbys]]'' "old man", and {{NL.}} [[-opia]] ([http://www.m-w.com/dictionary/Presbyopia Definition on Merriam-Webster]).
  • procto- Greek (prōktos - anus)
  • proctology Greek (''prōktos'' - anus) combined with the English suffix ''[[-logy]].''
  • proedria {{etyl|el}}
  • programme From {{LL.}} ''[[programma]]'', from {{etyl|el}}.
  • Prokaryota {{etyl|el}} ''pros'' before + ''karyon'' nut
  • Promethean From ''[[Prometheus]]'' a Greek [[demigod]] and the son of the [[Titan]] [[Iapetus]]. Prometheus created man from clay and gifted him with fire, for which he was punished by ''[[Zeus]]'' who chained Prometheus to a rock in the ''[[Caucasus]]'' where a vulture came and daily fed on his liver. Prometheus means "forethought" in Greek, from ''[[pro-]]'' "before" + ''[[mathein]] "to learn."
  • promethium 1945. From the name of the [[Greek]] god [[w:Prometheus|Prometheus]], who stole the fire from Mount Olympus and brought it down to mankind.
  • propaedeutic Greek propaideuein, pro-, before; + paideuein, to teach.
  • prophylaxis From {{etyl|el}}.
  • protea {{etyl|el}} '''Linneus''' 1707 - 1778: Named after Proteus the Greek [[warden]] of sea beasts, [[renowned]] for his ability to change shape.
  • Protea {{etyl|el}} '''Linneus''' 1707 - 1778: Named after Proteus the Greek [[warden]] of sea beasts, [[renowned]] for his ability to change shape.
  • proteacea Coinage by [[Linnaeus]], after Proteus the Greek [[warden]] of sea beasts, [[renowned]] for his ability to change shape.
  • protean From [[Proteus]], the Greek [[warden]] of sea beasts, renowned for his ability to change shape.
  • Proteobacteria {{etyl|el}} (protos), ''[[first]]'' + (bakterion), ''small rod'' - proposed in 1988, STACKEBRANDT (E.), MURRAY (R.G.E.) and TRÜPER (H.G.) Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol., 1988, 38, 321-325
  • proto- From {{etyl|grc}} {{term|||tr=protos|first|lang=grc}}.
  • Proto-Greek From {{term|proto-}} + {{term|Greek}}.
  • Protostomia Greek first + mouth
  • psychopomp {{etyl|el}}
  • pteridologist From {{etyl|el}} ''pteridos'' (fern) + [[-logist]]
  • pteridology From {{etyl|el}} ''pteridos'' (fern) + [[-logy]]
  • pteridophyte From {{etyl|el}} ''pteridos'' (fern) + [[-phyte]]
  • ptero- From the [[Greek]] ''ptero-'' or ''pter-'' ("wing" or "winged") or ''pteron'' ("feather")
  • pterodactyl From Greek '''[[ptero-]]''' ''wing'' + Greek '''[[dactylos]]''' ''finger'': Literally, ''wing-finger''.
  • Pterosauria {{etyl|el}} (pteron), ''[[feather]]'' + (sauros), ''[[lizard]]''
  • Ptininae {{etyl|el}} (phthios), to waste away
  • pyknotic From Greek ''pyknotikos'' meaning "to condense".
  • Pyracantha Greek (pyr), fire + (akantha), thorn <!-- needs Greek characters -->
  • pyramidoid {{etyl|el}}, {{suffix|pyramid|id}}; compare French {{term|pyramidoïde}}.
  • pyrargyrite Greek: fire + silver
  • pyrena New Latin, from Greek, the stone of fruit
  • pyrene {{etyl|el}}: fire
  • Pyrenean Latin [[Pyrenaei]] (sc. montes) the Pyrenees, from [[Pyrene]], Greek, a daughter of [[Bebryx]], beloved by [[Hercules]], and buried upon these mountains
  • pyrenoid {{etyl|el}} like a [[kernel]]. See [[pyrena]], and [[-oid]]
  • pyrosis * From Greek [[pyroun]] "to burn"
  • Pyrrhic victory Eponymous of the Greek king [[w:Pyrrhus of Epirus|Pyrrhus]] of Epirus, who suffered heavy losses while defeating the Romans.
  • Pythagorean theorem From [[w:Pythagoras|Pythagoras]] Greek mathematician and philosopher
  • From {{etyl|el|is}} ''pǐ'', ''peǐ'' used in [[mathematics]] to represent [[periphery]].
  • Raisa From the {{etyl|ru|fi}} saint's name {{term|Раиса|tr=Raísa|sc=Cyrl}}, probably from {{etyl|grc|fi}}, of unknown meaning.
  • Rasmus From the Latin saints' name [[Erasmus]], Greek ''Erasmos'' "beloved".
  • rhabdomantist From 17th century [[Greek]] "rod" + "ability"
  • rhapsodomancy {{etyl|el}} ''rhapsodos'', a reciter of epic poems.
  • rhizotomist {{etyl|el}} ''[[root]] [[cutter]]''
  • Rhoda {{etyl|grc}} ''Rhoda'' "rose" or "from the island of [[Rhodes]]".
  • Rhodeus From Greek ''rhodeos'', meaning "[[rose]]"
  • rhododendron From Greek (rhodo) "red" + (dendron) "tree"
  • Rhodophyta From {{etyl|el}} ''rhodo'' (red) + [[-phyta]]
  • risk {{unreferenced}} <!-- contradicts OED for "risk" and DRAE for "riesgo"; disputed at [[Wiktionary:Feedback]] --> Latin ''resicum, risicum, riscus : cliff, récif, Felsklippe'', is the direct formal origin for Italian ''risico, risco, rischio'', Spanish ''riesgo'' and French ''risque''. Latin word comes from a Greek navigation term ''rhizikon, rhiza'' which meant "root, stone, cut of the firm land" and was a metaphor for "difficulty to avoid in the sea".
  • rombencéfalo From {{etyl|grc|es}} ''rhombos'' [[hind]] and ''encephalos'' [[brain]]
  • rombencéfalo From {{etyl|grc|pt}} ''rhombos'' [[hind]] and ''encephalos'' [[brain]]
  • saprophagous {{etyl|el}} (sapros), ''[[rotten]]''
  • Saprospirae Greek [[sapros]] rotten + Latin [[spira]] coil
  • Sara Variant of {{etyl|he}} [[Sarah]] from the {{etyl|grc}} of the New Testament.
  • Sarcopterygii From Greek (sarco) 'flesh' + (pteryx) 'fin'
  • sardine from [[w:French language|French]] [[sardine]] (compare [[w:Spanish language|Spanish]] [[sardina]], [[sarda]], [[w:Italian language|Italian]] [[sardina]], [[sardella]]), [[w:Latin|Latin]] sardina, sarda; so called from island of [[Sardinia]], [[w:Greek language|Greek]] Sardō
  • satire Implied in {{term|satiric}} (attested in 1387) < {{etyl|la}} {{term|satira}} < earlier {{term|satura}} < {{term||lanx satura|full dish}} < fem. of {{term|satur}}. Altered in Latin by influence of Greek {{term|satyr}}, on the mistaken notion that the form is related to the Greek {{term||satyr drama}}.
  • Sauerstoff From the sour taste of pure oxygen on the tongue, loan translation of French ''[[oxygène]]'' < Greek-Latin ''[[oxygenium]]'' "acid-maker".
  • Sauria {{etyl|el}} (sauros), ''[[lizard]]''
  • Saurischia {{etyl|el}} (sauros), ''[[lizard]]'' + (?), ''[[hip]]''
  • scar From {{etyl|fro}} ''[[escare]]'', from {{LL.}} ''[[eschara]]'', from {{etyl|el}} ''[[eskhara]]''.
  • scatological From Greek, ''skat-'', ''skOr''=excrement. Later in Old English ''scearn'' =dung, and Latin ''muscerdae'' =mouse droppings
  • schizo- From {{etyl|grc}} ''schizein'' [[split]]
  • schizotrichia Comes from the Greek root ''[[schizo]]'' (divided or division) and ''[[trich]]'' or ''[[thrix]]'' (hair).
  • schéma From {{etyl|la}} ''[[schema]]'', from {{etyl|el}} ''[[skhema]]''.
  • scotic from Greek skotos, darkness
  • scruple {{etyl|la}} ''[[scrupulus]]'' a small sharp or pointed stone, the twenty-fourth part of an ounce, a scruple, uneasiness, doubt, diminutive of ''[[scrupus]]'' a rough or sharp stone, anxiety, uneasiness; perhaps akin to {{etyl|el}} the chippings of stone, a razor, {{etyl|sa}} ''[[kshura]]'': confer {{etyl|fr}} ''[[scrupule]]''.
  • se Representing the Indo-European demonstrative pronoun *{{term||soi}}, *{{term||so}}, adapted in West Germanic as a definite article by analogy with the ''t-'' stem forms (Old English {{term|þæt|lang=ang}}). Cognate with Old Saxon {{term|sē|lang=osx}}, Old Norse {{term|sá|lang=non}}, Gothic {{term|𐍃𐌰|lang=got}}, Greek {{term|ὁ|lang=el}}. See also feminine forms under {{term|seo|sēo|lang=ang}}.
  • Sebastian Name of an early [[Christian]] saint, from ancient city of [[Sebasta]] in [[Asia Minor]], {{etyl|grc}} ''sebastos'' "august, venerable", a translation of the Roman title [[Augustus]].
  • Selena First found in the seventeenth century, possibly from Greek ''[[Selene]]'', goddess of the moon, or Latin [[Caelina]] "heavenly".
  • selenodesy From {{etyl|grc}} ''selene'', Moon, + ''daiein'', to divide, by analogy with [[geodesy]].
  • selenology Latin & New Latin [[selenologia]] from Greek ''[[selene]]'' [[moon]] + ''[[-logia]]'' ([[-logy]])
  • semasiology From Greek semasia (meaning).
  • Senja [[Karelian]] form of the {{etyl|ru|fi}} saint's name {{term|Ксения|lang=ru}}, Latinized as [[Xenia]], ultimately from {{etyl|grc|fi}} "hospitable".
  • seo Representing the Indo-European demonstrative pronoun ''*siā, *sā'', adapted in West Germanic as the definite article by analogy with the ''t-'' stem forms (Old English [[þæt]]). Cognate with Old Norse [[sú]], Gothic [[𐍃𐍉]], Greek [[ἡ]]. See also the masculine forms under [[se#Old English|se]].
  • seysmologiya Greek '''seismos''' ''earthquake'' < '''seiein''' ''shake'' ''(plus '''logy''' - study of)''.
  • sgraffito '''Sgraffito''' is borrowed from the Italian, which derives from the Greek ''[[graphein]]'', meaning "to write or scratch."
  • sigur {{etyl|el|ro}} ''[[sighuros]]''
  • Simon New Testament version of Hebrew [[Simeon]] ,"hearkening", shaped to look like a Greek name from ''simos'' "snubbed nose".
  • sinapis From Greek
  • skedaddle Probably an [[alteration]] of British dialect {{term|scaddle||to run off in a fright}}, from the adjective {{term|scaddle#Adjective|scaddle|wild, timid, skittish}}, from {{etyl|enm}} {{term|scathel|lang=enm}}, {{term|skadylle||harmful, fierce, wild|lang=enm}}, of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Norse {{term|skathi||harm|lang=non}}. Possibly related to the Greek {{term||skedastios|lang=grc|dispersion}}. {{US}} Possibly related to [[scud]] or [[scat]]. {{rfe|Greek script needed}}
  • Skioptikon From Greek
  • skole {{etyl|non|no}} {{term|skóli}}, via {{etyl|ang|no}} {{term|scol}} {{etyl|fr|no}} or {{LG.|no}} {{term|schole}}, after {{etyl|nl|no}} {{term|scoele}}; originally from {{etyl|el|no}} {{term||skhole}}.
  • skoramis From {{etyl|el}}
  • sociopath From Greek ''[[socius]]'' ([[companion]]) + ''[[pathos]]'' ([[suffering]]).
  • solastalgia Coined by Australian philosopher and researcher Glenn Albrecht of the roots {{etyl|la}} ''[[solacium|sōlācium]]'' ([[solace|comfort]]) and {{etyl|grc}} [[-algia|algia]] (pain).
  • solea From {{etyl|grc|la}} {{term|solum||bottom, base|lang=la}}
  • solon From {{etyl|grc}} [[w:Solon|Solon]], the Athenian statesman.
  • Sonya From a {{etyl|ru}} pet form [[Соня]] ( Sónja ) of [[Sophia]], {{etyl|grc}} "wisdom". It was introduced into English through 19th century Russian literature and taken into general use in early twentieth century.
  • sophist Greek: "pursuer of wisdom"
  • sophisticated {{ML.}} ''[[sophisticatus]].'' (Eng. usg. 1601) <br> Ancient Greek ''[[sophist]].''
  • sophomore From {{etyl|el}} {{term|?|tr=sophumer|lang=el}}, from the obsolete {{term|?||sophism or dialectical exercise|tr=sophom|lang=el}}, likely influenced by {{term|?|tr=sophos|lang=el}} + {{term|?||wise fool|tr=moros|lang=el}}. {{rfe|script; el or grc? see also pedia article}}
  • spatula From {{etyl|la}} ''[[#Latin|spatula]]'' ("a flat piece"), the [[diminutive]] form of ''[[spatha]]'' ("a broad or flat tool") + ''[[-ula]]'' ("-ule") Compare ''[[spatha]]'' and ''[[spathe]]''. From {{etyl|el}} ''[[spathe]]'' ("broad blade").
  • speedometer [[speed]] with {{etyl|el}} ''[[-metron]]'' (cf. ''[[thermometer]]'').
  • spermophile From {{etyl|el}} [[sperm-]], "[[seed]]" + [[-philos]], "[[loving]]", hence, "seed-lover."
  • sphincter From late Latin ''sphincter'', from Greek ''sphinkter'', band, contractile muscle, from ''[[sphingein]]'', to bind tight. Compare [[Sphinx]], "the strangler".
  • Sphingobacteria {{etyl|el}} ''[[sphinx]]''
  • Sphingobacteriales {{etyl|el}} ''[[sphinx]]''
  • sphragistics From Greek ''sphragis'' (seal).
  • Spirochaetae Latin [[spira]] coil+ Greek [[khaite]] long hair
  • spondylosis From Greek spondylos meaning spine + [[-osis]].
  • spore From Modern Latin spora, from Greek. spora "seed, a sowing," related to sporos "sowing," and speirein "to sow," from PIE *sper- "to strew"
  • stater From {{etyl|el}} ''stater''.
  • stearic {{etyl|el}} (stear), ''[[tallow]]''
  • Stegosaurus From {{etyl|grc|mul}} [[stego]] (= plate/roof) + [[sauros]] (= lizard)
  • stenographer from Greek ''stenos'' 'narrow' + ''graph-'' 'to write' + English agentive [[-er]]
  • stich {{etyl|el}} ''[[stichos]]'' a row, line, akin to to go, march
  • stoic From {{etyl|la}} '''[[stoicus]]''', from Greek ''stoikos'', from ''Stoa Poikile'' (“Painted Portico”), the portico in Athens where Zeno was teaching
  • stoik From Greek '''stoikos''', from '''Stoa Poikile'''—''Painted Portico'', the portico in Athens where Zeno was teaching
  • stol From {{etyl|el|ro}} ''[[stolos]]''
  • stole {{etyl|ang}} {{term|stole|lang=ang}}, {{etyl|la}} {{term|stola}}, {{etyl|el}} ''a stole'', "garment", "equipment", from "to set", "place", "equip", "send", akin to English {{term|stall}}.
  • Strepsirrhini {{etyl|el}} ''[[bend]]'' or ''[[wet]]'' + ''[[nose]]''
  • Streptomyces {{etyl|el}} (streptos), ''[[twist]]'' + (mukes), ''[[fungus]]''
  • Streptomycetaceae {{etyl|el}} (streptos), ''[[twist]]'' + (mukes), ''[[fungus]]''
  • Streptomycineae {{etyl|el}} (streptos), ''[[twist]]'' + (mukes), ''[[fungus]]''
  • sub rosa First attested [[w:1654|1654]], from {{etyl|la}} [[sub rosa#Latin|sub rosā]], "[[under the rose]]", from [[sub]], ("[[under]]") + [[rosa#Latin|rosā]] (meaning "[[rose]]"). The rose's connotation for secrecy dates back to Greek mythology. [[Aphrodite]] gave a rose to her son [[Eros]], the god of love; he, in turn, gave it to [[Harpocrates]], the god of silence, to ensure that his mother's indiscretions (or those of the gods in general, in other accounts) were kept under wraps. In the Middle Ages a rose suspended from the ceiling of a council chamber pledged all present - those under the rose, that is - to secrecy.
  • sui From {{proto|Indo-European|swe|lang=la}}. Cognates include Ancient Greek {{term|ἕ|tr=he|lang=grc|sc=polytonic}}, Sanskrit {{term|स्वतह्|'''स्व'''तह्|tr='''sva'''taḥ|lang=sa|sc=Deva}}, and perhaps Old English {{term|self|'''se'''lf|lang=ang}} (English {{term|self|'''se'''lf|lang=en}}).
  • sumo From Greek
  • Susanna From {{etyl|grc}}, the New Testament form of {{etyl|he}} (shushan), ''[[lily]]''.
  • swastika From {{etyl|sa}} {{term|sc=Deva|स्वस्तिक|tr=svástika|lang=sa}}, from {{term|sc=Deva|सु|tr=sú||good, well|lang=sa}} + {{term|sc=Deva|अस्ति|tr=ásti-|lang=sa}}, a verbal abstract of the root of the verb "to be", {{term||svasti}} thus meanening "well-being" — and the diminutive suffix {{term|sc=Deva|क|tr=-ka|lang=sa}}; hence "little thing associated with well-being", corresponding roughly to "lucky charm". First attestation in English 1871, Sanskritism replacing Greek term {{term|gammadion}}. From 1932 specifically referring to the emblem of the [[Nazi]] party; German {{term|Hakenkreuz|lang=de}}.
  • syllabus From [[w:Vulgar Latin|Late Latin]] '''syllabus''' ''list'', a misreading of [[w:Greek lanugage|Greek]] '''[[sittybos]]''' (pl. of ''[[sittyba]]'' ''parchment label, table of contents'' of unknown origin) in a 1470s edition of Cicero's "Ad Atticum" iv.5 and 8.
  • Synapsida {{etyl|el}} ''[[fused]]'' + (hapsis), ''[[arch]]'' or ''[[loop]]''
  • synophrys Greek “with meeting eyebrows”
  • synovium From Greek syn- ("with") + oon ("egg"), as [[synovial fluid]] resembles the white of an egg.
  • syntagma {{LL.}} < French ''[[syntagme]]'' < {{etyl|el}} ''suntagma'', ''suntagmat-'' "arrangement, syntactic unit" < {{etyl|el}} ''suntassein'', ''suntag-'' "to put in order"
  • szkielet From {{etyl|el|pl}}
  • tachometer Greek [[tachy-]], 'fast' + [[-meter]]
  • tachymeter Greek [[tachy-]], 'fast', 'speedy' + [[-meter]]
  • Tamara [[Greek Orthodox]] saints' name from the twelfth century, probably a form of biblical [[Tamar]], {{etyl|he}} "date palm".
  • Tatiana Popular saints' name in the [[Greek Orthodox]] Church, feminine of Latin [[Tatianus]], derivative of [[Tatius]], a Roman family name of obscure origin.
  • Tau Greek, see [[tau#Etymology|tau]]
  • taumaturgia Greek ''[[thaumatourgía]]''.
  • taverna {{etyl|el}}
  • teatteri From {{etyl|sv|fi}} {{term|teater}} ← {{etyl|de|fi}} ← {{etyl|fr|fi}} ← {{etyl|la|fi}} {{term|theatrum|thēatrum}} ← {{etyl|el|fi}}.
  • technopoleis From [[techno-]] ''[[hi-tech]], [[computerised]]'' (back-formation from words such as [[technology]]) + {{etyl|el}} [[-poleis]] ''[[cities]]''.
  • technopolis From [[techno-]] ''[[hi-tech]], [[computerised]]'' (back-formation from words such as [[technology]]) + {{etyl|el}} [[-polis]] ''[[city]]''. {{wikipedia}}
  • technopolises From [[techno-]] ''[[hi-tech]], [[computerised]]'' ([[appendix:Glossary#back-formation|back-formation]] from words such as [[technology]]) + {{etyl|el}} [[-polis]] ''[[city]]'' + [[-es]] English postsibilant pluralising suffix.
  • tectonic {{etyl|el}} (tekton), ''[[builder]]''
  • teknonym {{etyl|el}} (teknon), ''[[child]]'' + (-onym), ''[[name]]''
  • tektite {{etyl|el}} (tektos), ''[[molten]]''
  • telecine Derived from {{etyl|el}} ''tele'', meaning "far off", and ''cine'', meaning "motion" (the same root as {{term|cinema}}).
  • teleconference A contraction of the English: [[telephone conference]]. Or, from the Greek ''tele-'' (distance) and conference.
  • teleology {{etystub}} From the Greek word ''telos'' meaning "purpose"
  • telephoto {{etyl|el}} [[tele-]] + a shortening of [[photograph]]
  • teleport ''tele'' + ''port''. The [[Greek]] ''tele'' meaning "[[far]]" and the [[Old French]] ''porter'' meaning "to carry", from the [[Latin]] ''portare''.
  • teletherapy {{etyl|el}} tele ("distant") + therapy from Greek (therapeia) "attendance, treatment, healing, service".
  • television From {{etyl|el}} {{term|tele-||distant}} + {{term|vision}} from {{etyl|la}} {{term|visio||vision, seeing|lang=la}}, noun of action from the perfect passive participle {{term|visus||that which is seen}}, from the verb {{term|videre||to see}} + action noun suffix {{term|-io|lang=la}}.
  • telirrhizos Presumably from {{etyl|grc|la}}.
  • tera- From {{etyl|el}} ''teras'', monster.
  • Teresa First recorded as the name of a fourth century Spanish saint. Of obscure origin, suggestions include [[Therasia]] or [[Thera]], ancient name of the [[Greek]] island '''[[Thira]]'''.
  • terpsichorean From {{term|Terpsichore}}, the Muse of dance in Greek mythology.
  • tesauro Latin ''[[thesaurus]]'', treasure, from Greek
  • tessaracoste From {{etyl|grc|la}}.
  • tetralemma [[w:Greek language|Greek]] ''tetra'', "[[four]]" + ''lēmma'', "auxiliary proposition"
  • tetramerous {{etyl|el}} ''tetra-'' four; ''meros'' part
  • tetraplicate From Latin ''plicare'', ''to fold'' + Greek ''tetra'', ''four''. <!-- similarily, homosexual is the Greek prefix ''homo-'' plus the Latin ''sexualitis''. -->
  • Tetrapodomorpha {{etyl|el}} (tetra), ''[[four]]'' + (pod), ''[[foot]]'' + (morphe), ''[[form]]''
  • tetrasyllabic {{etyl|el}} [[tetra-]] + [[syllable]] + [[-ic]] adjectival suffix.
  • thalassic {{etyl|el}} (thalass), or (thalatt) "sea"
  • thalassocracy {{etyl|el}} (thalassa), ''[[sea]]'' + (kratos), ''[[rule]]''
  • thematize From Greek ''themat-'' + ''[[-ize]]''
  • Theobroma {{etyl|el}} ''food of the gods''
  • Theodora From {{etyl|grc}} feminine form of [[Theodore]].
  • theonym From classical Greek ''[[theos]]'' for god, ''[[nym]]'' for name.
  • Theophilus {{etyl|grc}} "loved by God".
  • Thermidor From {{etyl|el}} ''[[thermos]]'' (heat)
  • thermo- From {{etyl|el}} ''[[thermos]]''.
  • thermos From {{etyl|el}} 'thermos', « warm».
  • thermotropic From the Greek stem ''[[thermo]]'' meaning heat
  • thief in the night A [[calque]] from Greek.
  • thuris Greek ''thyos'', sacrifice.
  • Tiffany From a surname based on a medieval given name [[Theophania]], from {{etyl|grc}} ''theos'' "god"+''phainein''"to appear", traditionally given to girls born at [[Epiphany]].
  • timocracy < [[Medieval Latin]] ''[[timocratia]]'' < Greek ''tīmokratíā'' < ''[[tīmē]]'' valuation; honor + ''-kratíā'' a rule, reign < ''krateîn'' to rule
  • Timothy {{etyl|el}} (timan), ''to [[honour]]'' + (theos), ''[[god]]''
  • tirano Latin ''[[tyrannus]]'', from Greek
  • Tobias From the {{etyl|grc}} form of biblical [[Tobiah]], {{etyl|he}} "[[Yahweh]] is good".
  • tomography Greek tomo (slice, section) + Greek Graphos (that describes)
  • topiary From the Latin ''[[topiarius]],'' from Greek (''topos''), which means ''[[place]].'' The adjective use dates to 1592, the noun use dates to 1908.
  • tornus From Greek
  • toro From {{etyl|la|es}} ''[[torus]]'', from Greek
  • tortuga Latin [[Tartarucchus]], a mythological spirit of Greek origin.
  • toxine From {{etyl|grc}} [[toxikon]] 'poison'
  • Tragopan satyra All three parts have to do with ''[[goat]]'': Greek ''tragos'' "male goat" (compare [[tragedy]]); Greep ''[[Pan]]'' (ancient god with goat feet); Latin [[satyrus]] "[[Satyr]]"
  • trapezium Recorded since 1570, from Late Latin [[trapezium]], from {{etyl|el}} [[trapezion]] (''trapezion'') "irregular quadrilateral," literally "a little table", diminutive of [[trapeza]] "table", itself from [[tra-]] "four" + [[peza]] "foot, edge"
  • trephination {{etyl|el}} ''trupanon'': bore
  • Triceratops From Ancient Greek (tri) "three" + (ceratos) "horn".
  • trichophilia From Greek '''''[[tricho]]''''', "hair" + Greek '''''[[philia]]''''', "love"
  • trigonometry {{etyl|la}} [[trigonometria]] from {{etyl|el}} (trigonon), ''a [[triangular]] [[harp]]''
  • triptych Greek tri- "three" + ptyche "fold".
  • triskaideka- {{etyl|el}} [[tris]], three + [[kai]], and + [[deka]], ten.
  • triskelion New Latin, from Greek triskeles, ''three legged''
  • Troglodytes {{etyl|el}}
  • Troglodytidae {{etyl|el}}
  • tropic {{etyl|el}} (trope), a [[turning]]
  • troposphère Coined by French meteorologist [[:w:Léon Teisserenc de Bort|Léon Teisserenc de Bort]] from {{etyl|el}} ''[[tropos]]'' "turn, change" and ''[[sphaira]]''.
  • truncated icosahedron From {{etyl|el}} [[icosa-]] + [[-hedron]]
  • typhus From the Greek ''[[typhos]]'', meaning [[smoky]] or [[hazy]], describing the state of mind of those affected with typhus.
  • Tyrannosauridae {{etyl|el}} (tyrannos), ''[[tyrant]]'' + (suuros), ''[[lizard]]''
  • Tyrannosaurus rex {{etyl|el}} (tyrannos), ''[[tyrant]]'' + (sauros), ''[[lizard]]
  • Tyrannosaurus {{etyl|el}} (tyrannos), ''[[tyrant]]'' + (suuros), ''[[lizard]]''
  • tărăboi Substratum word. Has an ancient Greek cognate.
  • uaine Irish [[uainne]], [[uaithne]], Early Irish [[úane]]. Strachan suggests the possibility of a Gadelic [[*ugnio-]], root [[ve@g]], be wet, Greek [[u@`grós]], wet (see [[feur]]).
  • ultra- From the {{etyl|la}} word meaning 'beyond', its {{etyl|el}} equivalent being '[[meta]]'.
  • Urania From the Greek ''ouran(os)'', (heaven) + ''-ia'', (common feminine ending)
  • uranography {{etyl|el}}
  • Urochordata {{etyl|grc}} (ouro) ''[[urine]]'' + {{etyl|la}} [[chorda]], ''[[cord]]''
  • urophilia From [[uro-]] (from {{etyl|el}} [[ouron]]) 'urine -' + [[-philia]] 'love for'
  • vega Perhaps chosen arbitrarily as a word beginning with "v" (for "volatility") that sounds as if it could be a Greek letter (like the related risk parameters "delta", "gamma" etc.)
  • Vesta From the {{etyl|la}} ''vestale'', (to dwell, stay, similar in idea to the Greek ''hestia''.) ''Vesta'' itself came to mean chaste, pure, or virgin, based from this goddess.
  • vial {{etyl|enm}} {{term|viole|lang=enm}}, {{term|fiole|lang=enm}}, {{etyl|fro}} {{term|fiole|lang=fro}}. From {{etyl|grc}} word {{term|||tr=phiale|a broad flat container|lang=grc}}. See also {{term|phial}}.
  • Volaticotherium antiquus {{etyl|la}} [[volaticus]], ''[[winged]]'' or ''[[flying]]'' + {{etyl|el}} (theri), ''[[beast]]'' + {{etyl|la}} [[antiquus]], ''[[ancient]]''
  • vín From {{etyl|la|is}} ''[[vinum|vīnum]]'' ("[[wine]]"), which is derived from the {{etyl|el|is}} word ''[[oǐnos]]''.
  • wildfire [[wild|Wild]] + [[fire]]. In the Middle Ages, the term referred to [[w:Greek fire|Greek fire]]. <!-- from WP: The modern usage may have resulted from a misunderstanding of the phrase ''[[spread like wildfire]]''. -->
  • wolfsbane From ''[[wolf]]'' + ''[[bane]]'', calque of {{etyl|la}} ''[[lycoctonum]]'', from {{etyl|el}} ? (''lykotonon''), from {{etyl|el}} ? (''lykos'') "wolf" + base of ? (''kteinein'') "to kill".
  • xenelasy Greek
  • xeriscaping From the verb [[xeriscape]], itself from [[xeric]] (from {{etyl|el}} [[xeros]] 'dry') + [[landscape|(land)scape]].
  • xerophagy [[Greek]] ''xeros'' (dry) and [[-phagy]]
  • xesturgy [[Greek]]
  • xiphiplastron {{etyl|el}} (xifos), ''[[sword]]'' + ''[[plastron]]''
  • xoanon Greek
  • xylogenesis {{etyl|el}} ''[[xylon]]'' wood; ''[[genesis]]'' birth
  • Xylokastro Greek, lit. the ''wooden castle''
  • xyster From {{etyl|el}} '''xūstēr''' (scraper), from '''xūein''' (scrape).
  • Yolanda Spanish form of a medieval royal name of obscure, probably Germanic, origin. It has been identified with Latin ''Violante'' and Greek ''ion + anthos'' "violet flower".
  • Zacharias From the New Testament Greek form of Old Testament [[Zachariah]] and [[Zechariah]], Hebrew ''secharyah'' "[[Yahweh]] has remembered".
  • Zaglossus {{etyl|el}}
  • Zebedee From the {{etyl|grc}} form of [[Zebadiah]]
  • zenzic From {{etyl|el}} via {{etyl|it}} [[censo]] ''property'' and {{etyl|de}} [[zenzi]] ''a number squared''.
  • zeon {{etyl|el}} ''[[boiling]]''
  • zephyr From the {{etyl|el}} ''[[Zephyros]]'', (also transliterated as ''Zephuros'') meaning "the West Wind" (as a personification or god). It is probably derived from Greek ''zophos'' meaning "black" or "dark," hence "the West."
  • zmeură Greek
  • zoaea < {{NL.}} ''zoea'' < Ancient Greek ''zōē'' life
  • zoo Shortened form of [[zoological garden]], and now the usual form. See [[zoology]], combining form of [[w:Ancient Greek|Greek]] '''[[zoion]]''' ''an [[animal]]'', literally ''a living being'', from [[w:Proto-Indo-European language|PIE]] base '''[[* gwei-]]''' ''to [[live]], [[life]]'' (cf. Greek ''[[bios]]'' ''life'', Old English ''[[cwicu]]'' ''living;'' see ''[[bio-]]'') + '''[[-logia]]''' ''study'', from '''[[logos]]''' ''word''.
  • zootic {{etyl|el}} ''an animal''
  • zoöphaga New Latin, from Greek animal + to eat
  • zoöphagous Greek; an animal + to eat
  • zoöphilist [[Zoö-]] + Greek to love
  • zyg- From Greek ''[[zygon]] yoke''
  • zygapophysis Greek a [[yoke]] + English [[apophysis]]
  • zygo- From Greek ''[[zygon]]'' meaning [[yoke]]
  • zygodactylic From {{etyl|el}}
  • zygodactylous From {{etyl|el}} ''zygo'' "paired" + ''dactyl'' "toe"
  • zym- From Greek ''[[zyme]] leaven''
  • zyme From {{etyl|el}}.
  • zyophyte From {{etyl|el}}
  • απορριμάτων Of native Greek origin.
  • γέφυρα Uncertain. Compare Armenian {{term|կամուրջ|sc=Armn|tr=kamurǰ||bridge}} and Hattic hammuruwa {{rfscript|Cuneiform}}. Beekes argues for a Pre-Greek origin.
  • δειράς Liddell and Scott propose Sanskrit {{term|दृषद्|tr=dṛṣad|lang=sa|sc=Deva}} as a cognate. However, Pokorny argues for an origin from {{proto|Indo-European|gʷer|lang=grc}}, citing Sanskrit {{term|गिरि|tr=giri|lang=sa|sc=Deva}} as a cognate. Beekes argues for a Pre-Greek origin.
  • εἶμι From {{proto|Indo-European|h₁ey-|lang=grc}}. Cognates include Mycenaean Greek {{term|sc=Linb|𐀂𐀍𐀳|tr=i-jo-te|lang=gmy}}, Latin {{term|eo|eō|I go|lang=la}}, Sanskrit {{term|sc=Deva|एति|tr=éti||goes|lang=sa}}, Hittite {{term|sc=Xsux|tr=iyatta|𒄿𒄿𒀀𒋫𒋫||goes|lang=hit}}, Old Persian {{term|sc=Xpeo|tr=aitiy|𐎠𐎡𐎫𐎡𐎹||goes|lang=peo}}, Old Church Slavonic {{term|sc=Cyrl|ити|tr=iti}}.
  • κάμπτω While most argue for a PIE origin, citing possible cognates such as Latin {{term|campus|lang=la}} and Lithuanian {{term|kampas|lang=lt}}, {{term|kumpas|lang=lt}}, [[w:Robert S. P. Beekes|Beekes]] argues for a Pre-Greek origin.
  • λουλούδι Medieval Greek, from {{etyl|la|el}} {{term|lilium||lang=la}}, lily.
  • νύμφη Unclear. Attempts have been made to link with Latin {{term|nubo|nubō|marry|lang=la}}, but are problematic, not only because of a wide semantic difference, but also because of the internal nasal. Beekes argues for a Pre-Greek origin.
  • Σεβαστός Greek calque of Latin [[Augustus]]
  • τύραννος Uncertain. Perhaps a Mediterranean borrowing? [[w:Robert Beekes|Beekes]] argues for a [[w:Pre-Greek|Pre-Greek]] origin.
  • χώρα Uncertain. No apparent cognates outside of Greek.
  • ψιττακός Likely of non-Greek origin.
  • Гордей From {{etyl|grc|ru}} {{term|||tr=Gordias|lang=grc}}.
  • милъ From {{proto|Slavic|milъ|lang=cu}}, from {{proto|Balto-Slavic|meiʔlos|lang=cu}}, from {{proto|Indo-European|meyl-|lang=cu}}. Baltic cognates include Lithuanian {{term|mielas||nice, deer, sweet|lang=lt}}, Latvian {{term|mĩl̨š||sweet, dear, kind|lang=lv}}, Old Prussian {{term|mijls||sweet, dear|lang=prg}}. Other Indo-European cognates include Latin {{term|mitis|mītis|of soft taste}} and Greek ''meília''.
  • јефтин From {{etyl|el|sr}}.
  • ابجدي From the first four letters of the Arabic alphabet arranged in the old style, which is similar to the Greek and Hebrew order. This is the standard alphabetical order used in lists and for numbering paragraphs. The alphabet is divided into these eight barbarous words, as memorialized in a popular children’s song: {{Arab|ابجد هوز حطي كلمن سعفص قرشت ثخذ ضظغ}}
  • अप From {{proto|Indo-European|h₂epo|lang=sa}}. Indo-Iranian cognates include Old Persian {{term|𐎠𐎱|tr=apa|sc=Xpeo|lang=gmy||away}} and Avestan {{rfscript|Avestan}} {{term||apa}}. Other Indo-European cognates include Myceanean Greek {{term|𐀀𐀢|tr=a-pu|sc=Linb|lang=gmy}}, Latin {{term|ab|lang=la||from}}, Gothic {{term|𐌰𐍆|lang=got|sc=Goth|tr=af||of}}, Old English {{term|æf|lang=ang||of}}, {{proto|Slavic|po|lang=|title=Common Slavic}}.
  • पाति From {{proto|Indo-Iranian|paH-|lang=sa}}, from {{proto|Indo-European|peh₂-|to protect|lang=sa}}. Cognates include Old Persian {{term|sc=Xpeo|𐎱𐎠𐎮𐎹|tr=pādiy|lang=peo}}, Latin {{term|pasco|pascō|lang=la}} and Mycenaean Greek {{term|sc=Linb|𐀡𐀕|tr=po-me|lang=gmy}}.
  • ἀγρός From {{proto|Indo-European|h₂éǵros|lang=grc}}. Cognates include Mycenaean Greek {{term|𐀀𐀒𐀫|tr=a-ko-ro|sc=Linb|lang=gmy}}, Latin {{term|ager|lang=la}}, Sanskrit {{term|sc=Deva|अज्र|tr=ájra|lang=sa}} and Old English {{term|æcer|lang=ang}} (English {{term|acre|lang=en}}).
  • ἀμυγδάλη [[w:Pre-Greek|Pre-Greek]]
  • ἄλβος The transliteration into Greek of the {{etyl|la|grc}} word {{term|albus|lang=la}}.
  • Ὀρνεαί Named after [[Orneus]] ''(Greek spelling needed)''
  • ῥάβδος Origin unclear. Perhaps from a {{proto|Indo-European|urb|lang=grc}}, with cognates such as {{etyl|lt|-}} {{term|virbas|lang=lt}}, {{etyl|cu|-}} {{term|вєрба||tr=vérba|lang=cu|sc=Cyrl}} and {{etyl|la|-}} {{term|verbenae|verbēnae|lang=la}}. Beekes argues for a Pre-Greek origin.
  • ケンタウルス {ME}; Latin ''[[Centaurus]];'' ''Greek ''(Kentauros);'' (Eng. usg. ca. 14c)
  • 고대 그리스어 From {{ko-inline|고대|godae|ancient times|古代}} + {{ko-inline|그리스어|geuriseu-eo|Greek language}}.
  • 𐎠𐎡𐎫𐎡𐎹 From {{proto|Indo-Iranian|Hai-|lang=peo}}, from {{proto|Indo-European|h₁ey-|lang=peo}}. Cognate with Sanskrit {{term|sc=Deva|एति|tr=éti||goes|lang=sa}}, Mycenaean Greek {{term|sc=Linb|𐀂𐀍𐀳|tr=i-jo-te|lang=gmy}}, Latin {{term|eo|lang=la||I go}}, Luwian {{term|sc=Xsux|𒄿𒄿|tr=iti||goes|lang=xlu}}, Hittite {{term|sc=Xsux|tr=iyatta|𒄿𒄿𒀀𒋫𒋫||goes|lang=hit}}, Old Church Slavonic {{term|sc=Cyrl|ити|tr=iti}}.
  • 𐎠𐎱 From {{proto|Indo-European|h₂epo|lang=peo}}. Cognate with Mycenaean Greek {{term|𐀀𐀢|tr=a-pu|sc=Linb|lang=gmy}}, Sanskrit {{term|अप|sc=Deva|tr=ápa||away, off}}, Latin {{term|ab|lang=la}}.
  • 𐎱𐎠𐎮𐎹 From {{proto|Indo-Iranian|paH-|lang=peo}}, from {{proto|Indo-European|peh₂-|to protect|lang=peo}}. Cognates include Sanskrit {{term|sc=Deva|पाति|tr=pā́ti|lang=sa}}, Latin {{term|pasco|pascō|lang=la}} and Mycenaean Greek {{term|sc=Linb|𐀡𐀕|tr=po-me|lang=gmy}}.
  • 𒄿𒄿 From {{proto|Indo-European|h₁ey-|lang=xlu}}. Cognate with Sanskrit {{term|sc=Deva|एति|tr=éti||goes|lang=sa}}, Mycenaean Greek {{term|sc=Linb|𐀂𐀍𐀳|tr=i-jo-te|lang=gmy}}, Latin {{term|eo|lang=la||I go}}, Hittite {{term|sc=Xsux|tr=iyatta|𒄿𒄿𒀀𒋫𒋫||goes|lang=hit}}.
  • 𒄿𒄿𒀀𒋫𒋫 From {{proto|Indo-European|h₁ey-|lang=hit}}. Cognate with Sanskrit {{term|sc=Deva|एति|tr=éti||goes|lang=sa}}, Mycenaean Greek {{term|sc=Linb|𐀂𐀍𐀳|tr=i-jo-te|lang=gmy}}, Latin {{term|eo|lang=la||I go}}, Luwian {{term|sc=Xsux|tr=iti|𒄿𒄿||goes|lang=xlu}}.