Last modified on 13 August 2014, at 15:20

Viking

See also: viking

EnglishEdit

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Wikipedia

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

A loan from Old Norse víkingr. Already in Old English as wīcing and Old Frisian witsing, wising, but extinct in Middle English and loaned anew in the 19th century.

Old Norse víking (marauding”, “piracy) itself is from Old Norse vík (inlet”, “cove”, “fjord) + -ing (one belonging to”, “one who frequents) (the -r is the nominative desinence). Thus, “one from or who frequents the sea’s inlets”,

The Old English or Anglo-Frisian form, existing therein since at least the eighth century), could also have been derived from or influenced by Old English wīc (camp), on account of the temporary encampments which were often a prominent feature of the Vikings’ raids.[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

Viking (plural Vikings)

  1. (historical) One of the Scandinavian seafaring warriors that raided (and then settled) the British Isles and other parts of Europe in the 8th to the 11th centuries and, according to many historians, were the first Europeans to reach North America.
  2. (by extension) A stock character common in the fantasy genera, namely a barbarian, generally equipped with an ax or sword and a helmet adorned with horns.
  3. (colloquial) A Norseman (mediaeval Scandinavian).
  4. (American football) A player on the Minnesota Vikings NFL team.

Derived termsEdit

  • vike (jocular verb)

TranslationsEdit

Proper nounEdit

Viking

  1. A town in Alberta, Canada
  2. A city in Minnesota

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Viking” listed in the Oxford English Dictionary [2nd Ed.; 1989]

CzechEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse víkingr.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

Viking m

  1. Viking

DeclensionEdit


SlovakEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse víkingr.

NounEdit

Viking m (genitive singular Vikinga, nominative plural Vikingovia), declension pattern chlap

  1. Viking

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Viking in Slovak dictionaries at korpus.sk

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Originally a nickname, appearing in runestones, from Old Norse víkingr (a Viking). Revived as a given name since 1829.

Proper nounEdit

Viking

  1. A male given name.