Wiktionary:Translation requests/archive/2011-02

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February 2011

ädgü, شیر

Can someone verify that "ädgü" means "good"? A google search suggests that it is Old Turkish. 81.68.255.36 11:42, 1 February 2011 (UTC)

Oh yes. Also Persian شیر in the sense of "lion"..can we get an etymology for that? I was told that in Old Persian it would have been "shagr". Can someone verify that? 81.68.255.36 11:45, 1 February 2011 (UTC) what is etymology? Ok. shir = lion.

latin/english to khmer script for a tattoo please?

latin phrase "in omnia paratus" into khmer script please... i know it means "ready for anything" or "ready for all" pretty much in english... i need translated to khmer script! please as accurate as possible because this is a tattoo! thank you!!

ប្រុងស្នៀត (prong sniǝt, ready for anything)
កង្ខើញដៃចូលដាល់ (kɑngkʰaəñ day chool dal, ready to fight) —Stephen (Talk) 03:45, 5 February 2011 (UTC)

live life, no regrets into khmer :)

hey stephen, just wondering if you could translate:

'live life, no regrets'

much thanks and appreciation in advance!

នៅជីវិត កុំស្ដាយ (nɨv chiivɨt, kom sdaay). If it is important, like for a tattoo, you should get a second opinion. —Stephen (Talk) 12:30, 7 February 2011 (UTC)

Translate English to 1st century Galilean Aramaic (Jesus' Aramaic)

I would like to have the word- Emmanuel translated into Aramaic (ist century Galilean Aramaic) script

Aramaic: ܥܡܢܘܐܠ (Hebrew: עִמָּנוּאֵל, ʻImmānûʼēl) —Stephen (Talk) 05:11, 9 February 2011 (UTC)

German attribution of source

How do I best translate into English the following German constructions: "SUBJECT, so SOURCE, PREDICATE" and "SUBJECT PREDICATE, so SOURCE"? An example sentence: "Und diese Bildungsrepublik, so Merkel vorige Woche im Parlament, sei der beste Sozialstaat."[1] I am looking for a translation that is as succinct as possible and yet sounds native. Sometimes I am inclined to use "SUBJECT PREDICATE, so SOURCE", as I have seen this in English, but I am afraid this does not sound perfectly native.

This could be documented at so#German. --Dan Polansky 08:54, 8 February 2011 (UTC)

In a newspaper article or the like, "SOURCE said" would be most idiomatic in English: "And this republic of education, Merkel said last week in Parliament, is the best social state". You could also use "according to SOURCE" at the end. —Angr 08:36, 5 October 2011 (UTC)

tattoo ideas

Can someone please translate these phrases in both Latin and Greek (English alphabet): "With all of my heart, I love you." "I love you with all of my heart." "In life, there is death."

Thanks

Greek:
Me óli tin kardiá mou s’ agapó.
S’ agapó me óli tin kardiá mou.
Sti zoí, ypárchei kai o thánatos. —Stephen (Talk) 12:48, 8 February 2011 (UTC)

quote

Could someone translate "the most certain thing in life is death" in both Greek (English alphabet ) and Latin?

Greek:
Avtó pou eínai vévaio sti zoí eínai thánatos. —Stephen (Talk) 13:01, 8 February 2011 (UTC)

Latin: "Certissimam in vitam mortis est." RJB

English to khmer please

I would like this phrase translated into khmer text "Faith"

ទំលាក់ស្រីញី ប្រមូលភោគសម្ប័ទ (tumleak srǝy-ñii, prɑmool pʰouk-sɑmbat) —Stephen (Talk) 01:38, 9 February 2011 (UTC)

english to latin

Can someone translate "forever in my heart" into Latin?--174.158.171.1 00:21, 9 February 2011 (UTC)

FOREVER IN MY HEART = SEMPER IN MEO CORDE

English to Khmer please

Id love to have this quote translated into Khmer text. "All that we are arises with our thoughts. With our thoughts, we make our world."

as well as "I love my family"

ស្រឡាញ់គ្រួសារខ្ញុំ (srɑlañ kruəsaa knyom) —Stephen (Talk) 23:45, 9 February 2011 (UTC)

English to maroi

May your enemies run far away from you. If you acquire riches, may they remain yours always. Your beauty will be that of Apsara. (a celestial dancer in Khmer mythology) Wherever you may go, many will attend, serve and protect you, surrounding you on all sides.

english- gaelic

self, family and innocent, this I will defend.

Can I help you with these two pages? ama.translation@gmail.comÁáÀě

Hey I really need it urgently pls help me English to Sanskrit

Classical Sanskrit is the standard register as laid out in the grammar of Pāṇini, around the 4th century BCE. Its position in the cultures of Greater India is akin to that of Latin and Greek in Europe and it has significantly influenced most modern languages of the Indian subcontinent, particularly in India, Pakistan and Nepal. The pre-Classical form of Sanskrit is known as Vedic Sanskrit, with the language of the Rigveda being the oldest and most archaic stage preserved, its oldest core dating back to as early as 1500 BCE. This qualifies Rigvedic Sanskrit as one of the oldest attestations of any Indo-Iranian language, and one of the earliest attested members of the Indo-European language family, the family which includes English and most European languages.


Hinduism and Sanskrit are inseparably related. The roots of much of Hinduism can be traced to the dawn of Vedic civilization. From its inception, Vedic thought has mainly been expressed through the medium of the Sanskrit language. Sanskrit, therefore, forms the basis of Hindu civilization.

As language changes, so religion changes. In the case of Hinduism, Sanskrit stood for millennia as the carrier of most of Vedic thought before its dominance gradually gave way to the vernacular languages that eventually evolved into the modern day languages of Hindi, Gujarati, Bengali, Telugu, Kannada, and so on. Although the foundations of Hinduism are largely built on the vocabulary and syntax of Sanskrit, these modern languages are now the primary carriers of Hindu thought within India. While the shift from Sanskrit to these regional languages forced a change in the meaning of words, and therefore a change in how subsequent generations interpreted the religion, the shift was at least within the context of languages that were related to Sanskrit.

In the last century, however, a new phenomenon has been occurring. Hinduism has begun to emerge in the West in two significant forms. One is from Westerners who have come to embrace some variety of Hinduism through contact with a Hindu religious teacher. The other is through the immigration of Hindus who were born in India and who have now moved to the West. One of the first and most striking examples of the former scenario was Swami Vivekananda’s appearance in Chicago at the Parliament of World Religions in 1896. At the time, Vivekananda received wide coverage in the American press and later in Europe as he traveled to England and other parts of Europe. Along the way he created many followers. Swami Vivekananda was the trailblazer for a whole series of Hindu teachers that have come to the West and who still continue to arrive today. The incursion of so many Hindu holy men has brought a new set of Hindu vocabulary and thought to the mind of popular Western culture.

The other important transplantation of Hinduism into the West has occurred with the increase in immigration to America and other Western countries of Hindus from India. In particular, during the 1970s America saw the influx of many Indian students who have subsequently settled in America and brought their families. These groups of immigrant Hindus are now actively engaged in creating Hindu temples and other institutions in the West.

As Hinduism expands in the West, the emerging forms of this ancient tradition are naturally being reflected through the medium of Western languages, most prominent of which, is English. But as we have pointed out, the meanings of words are not easily moved from one language to the next. The more distant two languages are separated by geography, latitude and climate, etc. the more the meanings of words shift and ultimately the more the worldview shifts. While this is a natural thing, it does present the danger that the emerging Hindu religious culture in the West may drift too far a field. The differences between the Indian regional languages and Sanskrit are minuscule when compared to the differences between a Western language such as English and Sanskrit.

With this problem in mind, the great difficultly in understanding Hinduism in the West, whether from the perspective of conversion or from a second generation of Hindus, is that it is all too easy to approach Hinduism with foreign concepts of religion in mind. It is natural to unknowingly approach Hinduism with Christian, Jewish and Islamic notions of God, soul, heaven, hell and sin in mind. We translate Brahman as God, atman as soul, papa as sin, and dharma as religion. But Brahman is not the same as God; atman is not equivalent to the soul, papa is not sin and dharma is much more than mere religion. To obtain a true understanding of sacred writings, such as the Upanishads or the Bhagavad-Gita, one must read them on their own terms and not from the perspective of another religious tradition. Because the Hinduism now developing in the West is being reflected through the lens of Christianity, Judaism and Islam, the theological uniqueness of Hinduism is being compromised or completely lost.

Ideally, anyone attempting to understand Hinduism should have a working knowledge of Sanskrit. Ideally, all Hindu educational institutions and temples should teach Sanskrit, and all Hindu youth should learn Sanskrit. In reality this is not occurring, nor is it likely to occur. The critical mass that it takes to create a culture of Sanskrit learning is not here.

Even within the Hindu temples that are appearing in the West as a result of Hindu immigration, the demand for Sanskrit instruction is not there. And why should it be there? After all, these first generations of Hindu immigrants themselves do not know Sanskrit. Their Hinduism is through the regional languages. One may argue that Hinduism is still related closely enough to its Sanskritic roots through the regional languages. The problem with this argument is that even these regional languages are not being aggressively taught to the new generation. And if the history of other immigrant cultures to American is any gauge, the regional languages of India will die out after one or two generations in the great melting pot of America. This means that the Hindu youth of the second generation are gradually losing their regional ethnic roots and becoming increasingly westernized.

I do not suggest that this means the end of Hinduism. In fact I see positive signs when Hindu youth come to temples for darsana and prayer and increasingly ask for Hindu weddings and other pujas. But it does suggest that the new Hinduism that is developing in the West will evolve in a way that is divorced from its vernacular roots, what to speak of its Sanskritic roots, as Christianity in the West has developed separated from its original language base.

A solution to this problem of religious and cultural drift is to identify and create a glossary of Sanskrit religious words and then to bring them into common usage. Words such as Brahman, dharma, papa should remain un-translated and become part of the common spoken language when we speak of Hindu matters. In this way, at least an essential vocabulary that contains the subtleties of Hinduism can remain in tact. To a limited extent this is already occurring. Words such as karma, yoga and dharma are a part of common English speech, although not with their full religious meanings intact. In the right hand column is a list of terms along with a summary of their meanings that I suggest should be learned and remain un-translated by students of Hinduism. These are terms taken primarily from the Bhagavad-Gita and the major Upanishads.

Believe hope inspire

Can you translate this short paragraph from English to Tahitian or Hawaiian?

I am an invisible man. No, I am not a spook like those who haunted Edgar Allen Poe; nor am I one of your Hollywood movie ectoplasms. I am a man of substance, of flesh and bone, fiber and liquids – and I might even be said to possess a mind. I am invisible, understand, simply because people refuse to see me. Like the bodiless heads you sometime see in circus sideshows, it is as though I have been surrounded by mirrors of hard, distorting glass. When they approach me they only see my surroundings, themselves, or figments of their imagination – indeed everything and anything except me.

Please can you translate the following phrase into Scottish Gaelic

You are half of my whole

What doesn't kill me makes me stronger - English to Sanskrit / Perisan / Latin

I am looking for the correct translation of the phrase What doesn't kill me makes me stronger from English to Sanskrit / Perisan / Latin

And the correct script.

Thanks!

English to Gaelic???

im looking to get a tattoo of this so i want the translation to be absolutely sure and this seems like the best place i could find. "Never Forget The Ones That You Have Loved And Lost"

it would mean alot to me thank you!!!!

english to gaelic transaltion

i would like to translate "family will always be with you no matter where you are in life". i would like the best translation someone can do..

translate from French to English

I need to translate a Website, I would like to keep the original idea but be understood in the US.

"femme en devenir", "ce jeu d’équilibre féminin-masculin"

I would be very grateful. It is a very subtle text... Thanks a lot

There is not enough here to understand these terms accurately. Best I can do is: "solar woman", "woman in the making", and "the male/female balancing act". —Stephen (Talk) 09:58, 21 February 2011 (UTC)

Translation for beloved princess

Whats the translation for beloved princess in latin?

principissa dilecta. —Stephen (Talk) 11:13, 23 February 2011 (UTC)

ENGLISH TO KHMER

i want to get a tattoo that says "Family Over Everything" in Khmer

គ្រួសារមុនអ្វីៗទាំងអស់ (kruəsaa mun ’əvəy-’əvəy teang ’ɑh) —Stephen (Talk) 10:57, 21 February 2011 (UTC)

English to Aramaic

I want the the phrase "faith in Christ" translated into Galilean Aramaic please!

Only God can jusge me.

Russian Translation for King of ...

King of Hearts

King of Spades

King of Clubs

King of Diamonds

Russian for king is король (korolʹ), you can find translations into Russian at heart, spade, diamond and club. Mglovesfun (talk) 02:27, 25 February 2011 (UTC)
You would have to use some grammar here, there are two variants for each:
король червей / червовый король
король пик / пиковый король
король треф / трефовый король
король бубен / бубновый король
transliteration:
korólʹ červéj / červóvyj korólʹ
korólʹ pik / píkovyj korólʹ
korólʹ tref / trefóvyj korólʹ
korólʹ búben / bubnóvyj korólʹ

--Anatoli 03:05, 25 February 2011 (UTC)

Djalenga

Does anyone know what Djalenga means?? It may be from Kenya or somewhere in India... Would love to know what this name means...

Translate English to scots gaelic

Can ne1 translate "Whats for you, wont go past you" into scots gaelic?

I am my father's daughter into German

I would like to get "I Am My Father's Daughter" tattooed in German in remembrance of my late father, or perhaps a similar yet better sounding in German phrase.

Ich bin die Tochter meines Vaters. —Stephen (Talk) 12:03, 26 February 2011 (UTC)

Meanings

What does Bitch means in Cambodia?

I don’t understand your question. Do you mean, "how do you say ‘bitch’ in Cambodian"? —Stephen (Talk) 08:33, 28 February 2011 (UTC)
Last modified on 13 April 2014, at 23:11