Last modified on 24 August 2014, at 18:18

abacinate

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin abacinātus, perfect passive participle of abacinō; possibly formed from ab (off) + bacīnum (a basin) or bacīnus. Probably cognate with modern Italian abbacinare (to dazzle).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

abacinate (third-person singular simple present abacinates, present participle abacinating, simple past and past participle abacinated)

  1. (transitive, rare) To blind by holding a red-hot metal rod or plate before the eyes
    • 1905, James M. Ludlow, Sir Raoul, page 233:
      "You young scapegrace," said Dandolo, "I will myself abacinate you — in the Venetian way." "How's that?" "Blind your eyes with the glare, not of hot irons, but of new ducats. Count your pile."
    • 1945, Robert Hardy Andrews, Burning Gold[1], page 196:
      Their straining eyes abacinated by the cup of terror, their throats stopped, their powers dead within them, they hung breathless, motionless.
    • 1999, Srinivas Aravamudan, Tropicopolitans, ISBN 082232315X, page 220:
      This chiasmic image of the subject's imperviousness suggests a sensory deprivation beyond sublimity, like that of abacinated anti-epistemology.

Derived termsEdit


LatinEdit

VerbEdit

abacināte

  1. first-person plural present active imperative of abacinō