Last modified on 6 June 2014, at 16:23

abord

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English aborden, from abord.[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

abord (plural abords)

  1. (archaic) Manner or way of approaching or accosting; address. [since the early 1600s]
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Chesterfield to this entry?)

VerbEdit

abord (third-person singular simple present abords, present participle abording, simple past and past participle aborded)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To approach. [attested from around 1400 until the late 1600s]
  2. (transitive, rare) To accost. [since the early 1600s]
    • 1919, Ronald Firbank, Valmouth, Duckworth, hardback edition, page 82:
      Mrs Hurstpierpoint aborded her with a smile.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Philip Babcock Gove (editor), Webster's Third International Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged (G. & C. Merriam Co., 1976 [1909], ISBN 0-87779-101-5), page 6

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French, from aborder, from Old French aborder (to hit a ship in order to board it), from bord (side of a ship, edge), from Frankish *bord (side of a ship or vessel), from Proto-Germanic *burdą (edge, border, side), from Proto-Indo-European *bheredh- (to cut). Cognate with Old High German bort (edge, rim, rand), Old English bord (ship, side of a ship), Old Norse borð (edge, side of a vessel). More at board.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

abord m (plural abords)

  1. (literary) The manner with which one acts in the presence of another person or persons, especially in a first encounter.
  2. (rare) The surroundings of a place.
  3. (archaic) Arrival or accessibility by water.

Usage notesEdit

  • In the sense "surroundings", the word is almost always a pluralia tantum.
  • The sense "manner of acting" is usually now perceived as a backformation from aborder (to approach), and is most common in the expression être d'un abord and variations of it.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit

External linksEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French a + bord (exterior of a ship)

AdverbEdit

abord

  1. On board; into or within a ship or boat
  2. (nautical) Alongside.

PrepositionEdit

abord

  1. On board of; onto or into a ship, boat, train, plane.