Last modified on 23 May 2014, at 22:14

above stairs

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

(noun, adjective): abovestairs

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

above stairs (not comparable)

  1. (archaic) upstairs; in or on an upper floor.[1]
    • 1749: Henry Fielding, The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling
      The physician now arrived, and began to inquire of the two disputants, how we all did above-stairs? "In a miserable way," answered Thwackum.
    • 1877: Henry James, The American
      She took him to a room above-stairs, and introduced him to a bed on which a magnified bolster, in yellow calico, figured as a counterpane.
    • 1901: M. P. Shiel, The Lord of the Sea
      He was found above-stairs in an empty room, searching the floor for something.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Philip Babcock Gove (editor), Webster's Third International Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged (G. & C. Merriam Co., 1976 [1909], ISBN 0-87779-101-5), page 5