absolvitor

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Latin absolvitor (literally let him be acquitted), the third-person singular future passive imperative form of absolvō (I absolve, acquit, or declare innocent).[1] Compare absolutory.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

absolvitor (uncountable)

  1. (Scotland, law) A decision or decree made by a court in favour of the defendant in a given action; dismissal.
    • 1668 December 19, James Dalrymple, “Mr. Alexander Seaton contra Menzies” in The Deciſions of the Lords of Council & Seſſion I (Edinburgh, 1683), page 575:
      Pitmedden purſues Seaton of Menzies as Repreſenting his Father, who was one of the Purſuers Brothers Tutors, for his Fathers Intromiſſion with the Pupils Means, who alleadged Abſolvitor.

Derived termsEdit

AntonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Lesley Brown (editor), The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary, 5th edition (Oxford University Press, 2003 [1933], ISBN 978-0-19-860575-7), page 9

LatinEdit

VerbEdit

absolvitor

  1. second-person singular future passive imperative of absolvō
  2. third-person singular future passive imperative of absolvō

DescendantsEdit

Last modified on 10 February 2014, at 00:27