absolvitor

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Latin absolvitor (literally let him be acquitted), the third-person singular future passive imperative form of absolvō (I absolve, acquit, or declare innocent).[1] Compare absolutory.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

absolvitor (uncountable)

  1. (Scotland, law) A decision or decree made by a court in favour of the defendant in a given action; dismissal.
    • 1668 December 19, James Dalrymple, “Mr. Alexander Seaton contra Menzies” in The Deciſions of the Lords of Council & Seſſion I (Edinburgh, 1683), page 575:
      Pitmedden purſues Seaton of Menzies as Repreſenting his Father, who was one of the Purſuers Brothers Tutors, for his Fathers Intromiſſion with the Pupils Means, who alleadged Abſolvitor.

Derived termsEdit

  • decree of absolvitor

AntonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Lesley Brown (editor), The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary, 5th edition (Oxford University Press, 2003 [1933], ISBN 978-0-19-860575-7), page 9

LatinEdit

VerbEdit

absolvitor

  1. second-person singular future passive imperative of absolvō
  2. third-person singular future passive imperative of absolvō

DescendantsEdit

Last modified on 10 February 2014, at 00:27