Last modified on 8 July 2014, at 18:41

acclaim

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

  • First attested in the early 14th century.
  • (to applaud): First attested in the 1630's.
  • From Latin acclāmō (raise a cry at; applaud), formed from ad- + clāmō (cry out, shout).

VerbEdit

acclaim (third-person singular simple present acclaims, present participle acclaiming, simple past and past participle acclaimed)

  1. (transitive) To shout; to call out.
  2. (intransitive) To shout approval; to express great approval.
  3. (transitive, rare) To salute or praise with great approval; to compliment; to applaud; to welcome enthusiastically.
    • A glad acclaiming train. - Thomson
  4. (transitive, obsolete) To claim.
  5. (transitive) To declare by acclamations.
    • While the shouting crowd / Acclaims thee king of traitors. - Smollett
  6. (Canada, politics) To elect to an office by having no opposition.
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
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Etymology 2Edit

  • First attested in 1667.

NounEdit

acclaim (plural acclaims)

  1. (poetic) An acclamation; a shout of applause.
  2. (obsolete) A claim.
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit