Last modified on 25 June 2014, at 13:39

acumen

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Latin acūmen (sharp point).

PronunciationEdit

  • (US) IPA: IPA(key): /ˈæk.jə.mən/. Obsolete IPA(key): /əˈkju.mən/

NounEdit

acumen (plural acumens)

  1. Quickness of perception or discernment; penetration of mind; the faculty of nice discrimination.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 2, The Celebrity:
      Sunning himself on the board steps, I saw for the first time Mr. Farquhar Fenelon Cooke. [] A silver snaffle on a heavy leather watch guard which connected the pockets of his corduroy waistcoat, together with a huge gold stirrup in his Ascot tie, sufficiently proclaimed his tastes. [] But withal there was a perceptible acumen about the man which was puzzling in the extreme.
    • Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in The Adventure of the Missing Three-Quarter
      No, no, my dear Watson! With all respect for your natural acumen, I do not think that you are quite a match for the worthy doctor.
    • 1991, Silence Of The Lambs
      Hannibal Lecter: Why do you think he removes their skins, Agent Starling? Enthrall me with your acumen.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From acuō (make sharp or pointed, sharpen), from acus (a needle, a pin).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

acūmen n (genitive acūminis); third declension

  1. a sharpened point

InflectionEdit

Third declension neuter.

Number Singular Plural
nominative acūmen acūmina
genitive acūminis acūminum
dative acūminī acūminibus
accusative acūmen acūmina
ablative acūmine acūminibus
vocative acūmen acūmina

Derived termsEdit

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