Last modified on 15 December 2014, at 22:41

ad

EnglishEdit

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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Shortening.

NounEdit

ad (plural ads)

  1. (informal) advertisement.
    I have placed both of the ads in the newspaper as instructed.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From a shortening of the word advantage.

NounEdit

ad (plural ads)

  1. (tennis) advantage
  2. (debating) advantage
    ads and disads

Etymology 3Edit

From Latin ad (to, on).

PrepositionEdit

ad

  1. to, toward
Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


AzeriEdit

Other scripts
Cyrillic ад
Roman ad
Perso-Arabic آد

NounEdit

ad (definite accusative adı, plural adlar)

  1. name, first name, last name
  2. (grammar) noun

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit


HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Finno-Ugric *ïmta. Cognates include Finnish antaa, Ter Sami ann'ted, and Estonian and.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ad

  1. give someone -nak/-nek something -t/-at/-ot/-et/-öt
    Adok Sándornak egy könyvet. - I give Alexander a book.

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

(With verb prefixes):

(Expressions):


IdoEdit

PrepositionEdit

ad

  1. to (before a vowel for euphony instead of a)

ItalianEdit

PrepositionEdit

ad

  1. to, at, in (used before a vowel for euphony instead of a)
    1. Dallo ad Adamo. - Give it to Adam.

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *ád (near, at). Cognates include English at.

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

ad

  1. (with accusative, direction) toward, to, up to
    Ad vim atque ad arma confugere.
    To fly to violence and to fighting.

Related termsEdit

  • ad- (same word modified and used as a prefix)

Usage notesEdit

  • The word ad is an antithesis to ab (just as in is to ex; in a progressive order of relation, ad denotes, first, the direction toward an object; then the reaching of or attaining to it; and finally, the being at or near it.)
  • Often used of geographical position of a place in reference to the points of compass, with the verbs iaceō (lie, be situated), vergō (incline, slope), spectō (observe, see) etc.:
    Asia iacet ad meridiem et austrum, Europa ad septentriones et aquilonem.
    Asia lies near the prime meridian and the south, Europe near the northern regions and northern wind. (two words for north)
    Ad Atticam vergente.
    Inclining to Attic.
  • When appended to the beginning of a word, ad often becomes ap- when followed by ‘p’, as in appretiō, from pretium. But note that adpretiō is also found.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: ad (preposition)
  • Catalan: a (preposition)
  • Dalmatian: a (preposition)
  • French: à
  • Friulian: a (preposition)
  • Galician: a (preposition)
  • Italian: a (preposition), ad
  • Portuguese: a (preposition)
  • Romanian: a (preposition)
  • Sicilian: a
  • Spanish: a (preposition)

ManxEdit

PronounEdit

ad

  1. Third person plural.
    they, them

MeriamEdit

NounEdit

ad

  1. story

Old EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ād m

  1. fire, funeral pyre

DeclensionEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin ad.

PrepositionEdit

ad

  1. Alternative form of a (to; towards)

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin habet.

PrepositionEdit

ad

  1. Alternative form of a; third-person singular present indicative of avoir

PumpokolEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Yeniseian *ʔaʒ (I). Compare Assan and Arin aj and Kottish ai.

PronounEdit

ad

  1. I (first-person subjective singular)

Related termsEdit


Scottish GaelicEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ad f (genitive aide, plural adan or adaichean)

  1. hat
    ad a' bhile òir - the gold-rimmed hat
    bile na h-aide - the rim of the hat

TurkishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Turkic āt (“name”), from Proto-Turkic *āt.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ad

  1. name, first name, last name

SynonymsEdit

DeclensionEdit


VolapükEdit

PrepositionEdit

ad

  1. for, in order to, to