Last modified on 7 July 2014, at 20:02

affirmative

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French affirmatif, from Latin affirmativus, from affirmare (to assert).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

affirmative (comparative more affirmative, superlative most affirmative)

  1. pertaining to truth; asserting that something is; affirming
    an affirmative answer
  2. pertaining to any assertion or active confirmation that favors a particular result
  3. positive
    an affirmative vote
  4. Confirmative; ratifying.
    an act affirmative of common law
  5. dogmatic
    • Berkeley
      Lysicles was a little disconcerted by the affirmative air of Crito.
  6. (logic) Expressing the agreement of the two terms of a proposition.
  7. (algebra) positive; not negative

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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NounEdit

affirmative (plural affirmatives)

  1. Yes; an answer that shows agreement or acceptance.
    That's an affirmative Houston, the space shuttle has lost the secondary thrusters.
    10-4 good buddy. That's an affirmative - the tractor trailer is in the ditch at the side of the highway.
  2. (grammatical terminology) An answer that shows agreement or acceptance.
  3. (obsolete) An assertion.
    • 1646, Sir Thomas Browne, Pseudodoxia Epidemica, III.17:
      that every hare is both male and female, beside the vulgar opinion, was the affirmative of Archelaus, of Plutarch, Philostratus, and many more.

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

affirmative

  1. feminine singular of affirmatif

LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

affirmātīve

  1. vocative masculine singular of affirmātīvus