Last modified on 16 June 2013, at 12:13

after one's own heart

EnglishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

after one's own heart

  1. (idiomatic, of a person) Having the same opinions, feelings, or behaviour as oneself.
    • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, Acts XIII:
      I have founde David the sonne of Jesse, a man after myne awne hert, he shall fullfyll all my will.
    • 1898, Homer, Samuel Butler (translator), The Odyssey:
      "Look, Pisistratus, man after my own heart, see the gleam of bronze and gold- of amber, ivory, and silver. Everything is so splendid that it is like seeing the palace of Olympian Jove. I am lost in admiration."
    • 1905, George Bernard Shaw, Major Barbara:
      UNDERSHAFT [rising and approaching him]: Professor Cusins you are a young man after my own heart.
    • 1914, Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Warlord of Mars:
      I found the father of Thuvia a man after my own heart, and that night saw the beginning of a friendship which has grown until it is second only to that which obtains between Tars Tarkas, the green Jeddak of Thark, and myself.