Last modified on 28 May 2014, at 23:52

afterling

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From after +‎ -ling. Cognate with Scots afterling, efterling (afterling, adj).

NounEdit

afterling (plural afterlings)

  1. One who comes after or later; an aftercomer; one who is late.
    • 1877, Nicholas Patrick Wiseman, The Dublin review:
      Lange terms him "an afterling of the speculative Romanticism," and it seems clear that he is connected with the Hegelian Right and even with Schelling.
    • 1922, Albert Alonzo Pomeroy, History and genealogy of the Pomeroy family:
      [...] of fair probability, or unclouded possibility, he is not, in fair judgment justly subject to abuse or censure by some afterling, building upon his work, who happens to discover documents which he believes are unknown to the Colonel.

AdjectiveEdit

afterling (comparative more afterling, superlative most afterling)

  1. (dialectal, Scotland) Coming after; later; subsequent; of later date; late in order of time or succession.
    • 1890, Notes and queries:
      "That Heresie, whose afterling entry falling out in the dreg of all tymes doth render it suspect."