Last modified on 31 May 2014, at 12:34

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Scots agin, variant form of again (against).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ə.ˈɡɪn/
  • Rhymes: -ɪn
  • Hyphenation: a‧gin

AdverbEdit

agin (not comparable)

  1. (colloquial or now often humorous) Alternative form of again
    • 1859, Charles Dickens, "A Tale of Two Cities", in All the Year Round, vol. 1, p. 98:
      • At which juncture, he exclaimed, in a voice of dire exasperation : “Bust me, if she ain't at it agin !”

PrepositionEdit

agin

  1. (colloquial or now often humorous) Alternative form of against
    • 1859, Harper's New Monthly Magazine, vol. 19, p. 278:
      • [The Court] said: "Young man, this ere Court is satisfied that there ain't nothin' in the laws of Vermont agin tippin' over a churn full of sap. [...] But I want ye should remember one thing—that this ere Court has made up his mind that it's a very naughty trick, and it's a shame that there's so many maple-trees in the State, and no law agin tippin' over sap."

AnagramsEdit


ScotsEdit

PrepositionEdit

agin

  1. Alternative form of again