Last modified on 31 May 2014, at 12:39

ake

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ake (third-person singular simple present akes, present participle aking, simple past and past participle aked)

  1. Archaic spelling of ache.
    • ... for let our finger ake, / And it endues our other heathfull membersOthello (Quarto 1), Shakespeare, 1622
    • 1909, Henry C. Shelley, Inns and Taverns of Old London[1], edition text, The Gutenberg Project, published 2004:
      instead he went with the rogues to supper in an arbour, though it made his heart "ake" to listen to their mad talk.

Etymology 2Edit

Maori.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

ake (not comparable)

  1. forever

AnagramsEdit


GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

akē

  1. Romanization of 𐌰𐌺𐌴

HawaiianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Polynesian *qate, from Proto-Oceanic *qate, from Proto-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *qatay, from Proto-Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *qatay, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *qatay, from Proto-Austronesian *qaCay.

NounEdit

ake

  1. (anatomy) liver (organ of the body)

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

ake

  1. to yearn for, desire

JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

ake

  1. rōmaji reading of あけ