See also: akın and Akın

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

Prefix a- (for, of) +‎ kin

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

akin (comparative more akin, superlative most akin)

  1. (of persons) Of the same kin; related by blood.
    • 1722, Daniel Defoe, Moll Flanders, ch. 23:
      We are too near akin to lie together, though we may lodge near one another.
    • 1897, Joseph Conrad, The Nigger of the ‘Narcissus’, ch. 2:
      The faces changed, passing in rotation. Youthful faces, bearded faces, dark faces: faces serene, or faces moody, but all akin with the brotherhood of the sea.
  2. (often followed by to) Allied by nature; similar; partaking of the same properties; of the same kind.
    • 1677, Theophilus Gale, The Court of the Gentiles, T. Cockeril, part 4, bk. 1, ch. 2, p. 27:
      Is not then Fruition near akin to Love?
    • 1710, anon., "To the Spectator, &c.," The Spectator, vol. 1, no. 8 (March 9), p. 39:
      She told me that she hoped my Face was not akin to my Tongue.
    • 1814, Jane Austen, Mansfield Park, ch. 44:
      Such sensations, however, were too near akin to resentment to be long guiding Fanny's soliloquies.
    • 1837, Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers, ch. 39:
      Mr. Winkle . . . took his hand with a feeling of regard, akin to veneration.
    • 1910, Zane Grey, "Old Well-Well," Success (July):
      Something akin to a smile shone on his face.

Usage notesEdit

  • This adjective is always placed after the noun that it modifies.

TranslationsEdit

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AnagramsEdit


HungarianEdit

PronounEdit

akin

  1. superessive singular of aki

TagalogEdit

AdjectiveEdit

akin(g)

  1. (possessive) my.

PronounEdit

akin

  1. (possessive) mine.
Last modified on 31 March 2014, at 07:38