Last modified on 29 May 2014, at 00:02

algin

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From alga +‎ -in.

NounEdit

algin (plural algins)

  1. Any of various gelatinous gums, derivatives of alginic acid, derived from algae.
    • 1950, Valentine Jackson Chapman, Seaweeds and Their Uses, page 194,
      Algin was first discovered by Stanford in the early 1880's, and there is little doubt that the event was the beginning of a new era in the use of seaweeds. [] Since Stanford discovered algin the name has been applied to a number of substances derived from alginic acid.
    • 2002, George S. Brady, Henry R. Clauser, John A. Vaccari, Materials Handbook, page 826,
      All the algins are edible, but they pass unchanged through the alimentary tract and add no food value.
    • 2008, Robert Edward Lee, Phycology, page 459,
      Algin comprises about 10% of the dry weight of the kelps (Smith, 1955), and is mostly the salt of alginic acid.

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