Last modified on 5 October 2014, at 14:12

all and sundry

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

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PronounEdit

all and sundry

  1. (collectively) All; everyone.
    • 1581, Alexander Henderson & Archibald Johnston, National Covenant of the Church of Scotland
      And decerns and declares all and sundry, who either gainsay the word of the evangel [...] to be no members of the said kirk within this realm, and true religion presently professed, so long as they keep themselves so divided from the society of Christ's body.
    • 1905, Baroness Emmuska Orczy, chapter 2, The Affair at the Novelty Theatre[1]:
      Miss Phyllis Morgan, as the hapless heroine dressed in the shabbiest of clothes, appears in the midst of a gay and giddy throng; she apostrophises all and sundry there, including the villain, and has a magnificent scene which always brings down the house, and nightly adds to her histrionic laurels.
    • 1919, W. Somerset Maugham, The Moon and Sixpence, chapter 49
      From morning till night you saw her sitting on a low chair in the kitchen, surrounded by a Chinese cook and two or three native girls, giving her orders, chatting sociably with all and sundry, and tasting the savoury messes she devised.
  2. (separately) Each one.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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