Last modified on 3 November 2013, at 12:54

amphitheatrical

EnglishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

amphitheatrical (comparative more amphitheatrical, superlative most amphitheatrical)

  1. Having some of the characteristics of an amphitheatre.
    • 1829, "Metropolitan Improvements", in The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Vol. 13, No. 361, page 184[1]:
      A new Chapel, of novel design, being of an amphitheatrical form, has been recently completed, from the designs of W. Brooks, architect.
    • 1852, Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Blithedale Romance[2]:
      The hall was fitted up with an amphitheatrical descent of seats towards a platform, on which stood a desk, two lights, a stool, and a capacious antique chair.
    • 1919, John Reed, Ten Days That Shook the World,
      In the high, amphitheatrical Nicolai Hall that afternoon I saw the Duma sitting in permanence, tempestuous, grouping around it all the forces of opposition.

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