Last modified on 20 August 2014, at 21:44

EnglishEdit

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

  • (stressed)
  • (unstressed)
    • IPA(key): /ən/
    • (file)
  • Homophone: in (in some accents)

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English ān.

ArticleEdit

an

  1. Form, used before a vowel sound, of a
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 2, The Celebrity:
      Sunning himself on the board steps, I saw for the first time Mr. Farquhar Fenelon Cooke. He was dressed out in broad gaiters and bright tweeds, like an English tourist, and his face might have belonged to Dagon, idol of the Philistines.
  2. (UK, nonstandard) Form of a used in many British regional accents before some words beginning with a pronounced h
Usage notesEdit
  • The article an is used before vowel sounds and (optionally) before silent aitches, and a before consonant sounds.
  • The various article senses of a, all are senses of an.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English an

ConjunctionEdit

an

  1. (archaic) If, so long as.
    An it please you, my lord.
  2. (archaic) as if; as though.
    Samuel Taylor Coleridge, The Rime of the Ancyent Marinere (Original Version of 1797) 61-64:
    At length did cross an Albatross, Thorough the Fog it came; And an it were a Christian Soul, We hail'd it in God's Name.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Borrowing from Georgian.

NounEdit

an (plural ans)

  1. The first letter of the Georgian alphabet, (mkhedruli), (asomtavruli) or (nuskhuri).

Etymology 4Edit

From the Old English preposition an/on.

PrepositionEdit

an

  1. In each; to or for each; per.
    I was only going twenty miles an hour.
Usage notesEdit
  • This is the same as the word a in such contexts, modified because of preceding an unpronounced h. The train was speeding along at a mile a minute.
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

StatisticsEdit

AnagramsEdit


AlbanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Possibly a metaphorical use of anë 'vessel'.

NounEdit

an m

  1. uterus
SynonymsEdit
Related termsEdit

ArinEdit

NounEdit

an

  1. haunch

AromanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin annus. Compare Daco-Romanian an.

NounEdit

an n (plural anji)

  1. year

BretonEdit

Alternative formsEdit

ArticleEdit

an

  1. the

CimbrianEdit

ArticleEdit

an

  1. a (indefinite article)

ConjunctionEdit

an

  1. that (introduces a subordinate clause)

ReferencesEdit

  • “an” in Umberto Martello Martalar, Alfonso Bellotto, Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Setti Communi vicentini, 1st edition, 1974.

Crimean TatarEdit

NounEdit

an

  1. moment

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit


DanishEdit

VerbEdit

an

  1. Imperative of ane.

ElfdalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse hann. Cognate with Swedish han.

PronounEdit

an m

  1. he

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin annus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

an m (plural ans)

  1. A year

SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit

External linksEdit


FriulianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin annus.

NounEdit

an m (plural agns)

  1. year

GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German ana.

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

an (with an accusative or dative case object)

  1. (with a location in the dative case) on; upon; at; in; against
    Das Bild hängt an der Wand. ― The picture hangs on the wall.
  2. (with a time in the dative case) on; in
  3. (with a dative case object) by; near; close to; next to
  4. (with a dative case object) by means of; by
  5. (with an accusative case object) on; onto
    Ich hänge das Bild an die Wand. ― I hang the picture on the wall.
  6. (with an accusative case object) at; against
    Schauen Sie an die Tafel. ― Look at the blackboard.
  7. (with an accusative case object) to; for

Usage notesEdit

  • The preposition an is used with an object in the accusative case if it indicates movement from one place to another, whereas it is used with the dative case if it indicates a location.
  • When followed by the masculine article in the dative case (i.e. dem (the)), the two words contract to am (on the) and for the neuter article in the accusative case (i.e. das (the)), the two words contract to ans (on the).

AdverbEdit

an

  1. onward; on
    von heute an ― from today on

GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

an

  1. Romanization of 𐌰𐌽

GuernésiaisEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin annus.

NounEdit

an m (plural ans)

  1. year

Haitian CreoleEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From French un.

ArticleEdit

an

  1. the (definite article)
Usage notesEdit

Use this word when:

  • It modifies a singular noun, and
  • It is preceded by a word that ends with either:

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From French an (year)

NounEdit

an

  1. year
SynonymsEdit

IdoEdit

PrepositionEdit

an

  1. at, on (indicates contiguity, juxtaposition)

Derived termsEdit


IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish in.

PronunciationEdit

  • (article): IPA(key): [ənˠ]; between consonants [ə]
  • (preverbal particle): IPA(key): [ə]
  • (copular particle): IPA(key): [ənˠ]; before é, ea, í, iad [ə.n̠ʲ-]

ArticleEdit

an

  1. the
    ga ― the water
    ga ― the woman
    ga ― of the child
    ga ― at the girl

DeclensionEdit

Case Masculine singular Feminine singular Plural
Nominative/accusative anT anL naH
Genitive anL naH naN
Dative (ag) anDM (ag) anDF naH
DF: triggers eclipsis or lenition depending on dialect; no lenition of d, t; changes s to ts (pronounced like t)
DM: triggers eclipsis or lenition depending on dialect; no lenition of d, t, s
H: triggers h-prothesis
L: triggers lenition except of d, t; changes s to ts (pronounced like t)
N: triggers eclipsis
T: triggers t-prothesis of a vowel

ParticleEdit

an (triggers eclipsis; takes the dependent form of irregular verbs if available; not used in the past tense except of some irregular verbs)

  1. Used to form direct and indirect questions
    ga ― Are you listening?
    ga ― I don’t know if/whether he is here.

Related termsEdit

  • ar (used in the past tense of regular and some irregular verbs)

ParticleEdit

an

  1. used to introduce copular questions, both direct and indirect, in the present/future tense
    ga
    An maith leat bainne?
    ga
    Níl a fhios agam an é Conchúr a chonaic mé.

Related termsEdit


JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

an

  1. rōmaji reading of あん

JèrriaisEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin annus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

an m (plural ans)

  1. year

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit


KurdishEdit

ConjunctionEdit

an

  1. or

SynonymsEdit

  • yan (after a vowel-ending word)

LadinEdit

NounEdit

an m (plural ani)

  1. year

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Italic *an, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂en. Cognate with Lithuanian angu (or), Gothic 𐌰𐌽 (an, so? now?). May also be related to Ancient Greek ἄν (án, particle), Sanskrit [script?] (anā́), Avestan [script?] (anā), Lithuanian anàs, Proto-Slavic *onъ.[1]

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

an

  1. or, or whether (A conjunction that introduces the second part of a disjunctive interrogation, or a phrase implying doubt.)
    1. in disjunctive interrogations
      1. direct
        1. (introduced by utrum, “whether”)
        2. (introduced by -ne, interrogative enclitic)
        3. (introduced by nonne, “[is it] not”)
        4. (introduced by num, interrogative particle)
        5. (without an introductory particle)
      2. indirect
        1. (introduced by utrum (whether))
        2. (introduced by -ne, interrogative enclitic)
        3. (introduced by an)
        4. (without an introductory particle)
      3. or rather, or on the contrary (where the opinion of the speaker or the probability inclines to the second interrogative clause, and this is made emphatic, as a corrective of the former)
        1. hence, in the comic poets, as an potius
      4. or, or rather, or indeed, or perhaps (where, as is frequent, the first part of the interrogation is not expressed, but is to be supplied from the context, an begins the interrogation, but it does not begin an absolute – i.e., non-disjunctive – interrogation)
      5. {{label|la|in the phrase an nōn or not
        1. in direct questions
        2. in indirect questions
      6. (in the phrase an ne) pleonastic usage for an
        1. in direct questions
        2. in indirect questions
    2. (in disjunctive clauses that express doubt) or
      1.  ?
      2. denoting uncertainty by itself, without a verb of doubting
      3. (chiefly in and after the Augustean period) standing for sīve
      4. where the first disjunctive clause is to be supplied from the general idea or where an stands for utrum or necne
      5. Since in such distributive sentences expressive of doubt, the opinion of the speaker or the probability usually inclines to the second, i.e. to the clause beginning with an, the expressions haud sciō an, nesciō an, and dubitō an incline to an affirmative signification, “I almost know”, “I am inclined to think”, “I almost think”, “I might say”, “I might assert that”, etc., for “perhaps”, “probably”.
      6. Sometimes the distributive clause beginning with an designates directly the opposite, the more improbable, the negative; in which case nesciō an, haud sciō an, etc., like the English I know not whether, signify “I think that not”, “I believe that not”, etc.

Usage notesEdit

  • Used with utrum (whether) in the construction utrum...an (whether...or):
    Nescio quid intersit, utrum nunc veniam, an ad decem annos.
    I know not what matter it is, whether I come now or after ten years.

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • ăn in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879
  1. ^ Michiel de Vaan (2008), Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages, Leiden, Boston: Brill Academic Publishers

Low GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

an

  1. on
  2. to, at

InflectionEdit

AdverbEdit

an

  1. on

See alsoEdit


LuxembourgishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Germanic *andi.

ConjunctionEdit

an

  1. and

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Germanic *in.

PrepositionEdit

an

  1. in

MandarinEdit

RomanizationEdit

an

  1. Nonstandard spelling of ān.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of án.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of ǎn.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of àn.

Usage notesEdit

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Middle DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

an

  1. Alternative form of ane. (sense "on")

Middle EnglishEdit

PrepositionEdit

an

  1. in

ConjunctionEdit

an

  1. and

Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Old French an < Latin annus.

NounEdit

an m (plural ans)

  1. year

MirandeseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin in.

PrepositionEdit

an

  1. in
  2. on

NovialEdit

PrepositionEdit

an

  1. at, on, next to or contiguous with something

OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Old Provençal an < Latin annus.

NounEdit

an m (plural ans)

  1. year

Usage notesEdit

  • Also used with the verb aver (to have) to indicate age

Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *ainaz, from Proto-Indo-European *óynos. Germanic cognates include Old Frisian ān, Old Saxon ēn, Dutch een, Old High German ein (German ein), Old Norse einn (Swedish en), Gothic 𐌰𐌹𐌽𐍃 (ains). The Indo-European root is also the source of Latin unus, Ancient Greek οἶος (oîos), Old Irish oen.

PronunciationEdit

Cardinal numberEdit

ān

  1. (cardinal) one

Usage notesEdit

As in modern English, usage doubles as both a numeral and a pronoun.

ArticleEdit

ān

  1. a, an (indefinite article)

AdjectiveEdit

ān

  1. lone
  2. sole

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin annus.

NounEdit

an m (oblique plural anz, nominative singular anz, nominative plural an)

  1. year

Old IrishEdit

PronounEdit

an (triggers eclipsis, takes a leniting relative clause)

  1. Alternative form of a.
    • c. 875, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 112b13
      Is demniu liunn a n-ad·chiam hua sulib ol·daas an ro·chluinemmar hua chluasaib.
      What we see with the eyes is more certain for us than what we hear with the ears.

Old ProvençalEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin annus (year).

NounEdit

an m (oblique plural ans, nominative singular ans, nominative plural an)

  1. year

Old SaxonEdit

PrepositionEdit

an

  1. on, in

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin annus (year).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

an m (plural ani)

  1. year

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


RomanschEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Surmiran) onn
  • (Sutsilvan, Vallader) on

EtymologyEdit

From Latin annus.

NounEdit

an m (plural ans)

  1. (Puter) year

ScotsEdit

ConjunctionEdit

an

  1. and

Scottish GaelicEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Irish a.

PronounEdit

an

  1. their
Usage notesEdit
  • This form of possessive pronoun is not used before nouns beginning with b, f, m or p, where am is used instead.

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Irish i.

PrepositionEdit

an

  1. in
Usage notesEdit
  • This form is not used before nouns beginning with b, f, m or p, where ann am is used instead.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
  • The following prepositional pronouns:
Combining

pronoun

Prepositional

pronoun

Prepositional

pronoun (emphatic)

mi annam annamsa
tu annad annadsa
e ann annsan
i innte inntese
sinn annainn annainne
sibh annaibh annaibhse
iad annta anntasan

Etymology 3Edit

From Old Irish in.

ArticleEdit

an

  1. the
Usage notesEdit

This is the most common singular form. The most common plural form is na. For other forms and their specific uses, see pages listed in "See also" below.

See alsoEdit

SwedishEdit

AdverbEdit

an

  1. used as a verb particle, similar to German preposition an (at, in, on, to)

Related termsEdit

PrepositionEdit

an

  1. (accounting) to

Torres Strait CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English hand.

NounEdit

an

  1. hand, lower arm
  2. flipper

TurkishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Arabic آن (ʾān).

NounEdit

an (definite accusative anı, plural anlar)

  1. moment

DeclensionEdit


VietnameseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Sino-Vietnamese, from ("tranquil")

PronunciationEdit

  • (Hà Nội) IPA(key): /ʔaːn˧˧/
  • (Huế) IPA(key): /ʔaːŋ˧˧/
  • (Hồ Chí Minh City) IPA(key): /ʔaːŋ˧˥/

AdjectiveEdit

an

  1. safe, secure

SynonymsEdit


VilamovianEdit

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

an

  1. and

Related termsEdit