anacoluthon

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin anacolūthon, from Ancient Greek ἀνακόλουθον (anakolouthon, without sequence, anomalous [of inflections or grammatical constructions]), from ἀ(ν)- (a-, un-) + ἀκόλουθος (akolouthos, following).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

anacoluthon (plural anacolutha or anacoluthons)

Examples (intentional use of inconsistent grammatical structure)

You better not or, what do you think will happen?
He had long wanted, and even dreamed about, going to Paris.

  1. (grammar) A sentence or clause that is grammatically inconsistent, especially with respect to the type of clausal or phrasal complement for the initial clause.
  2. (rhetoric) Intentional use of such a structure.

HyponymsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • “anacoluthon” in the Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, 1974 edition.
  • Silva Rhetoricae

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek ἀνακόλουθον (anakolouthon, without sequence, anomalous [of inflections or grammatical constructions]), from ἀ- (a-, not) + ἀκόλουθος (akolouthos, following).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

anacolūthon n (genitive anacolūthī); second declension

  1. anacoluthon

InflectionEdit

Second declension neuter, Greek type.

Number Singular Plural
nominative anacolūthon anacolūtha
genitive anacolūthī anacolūthōrum
dative anacolūthō anacolūthīs
accusative anacolūthon anacolūtha
ablative anacolūthō anacolūthīs
vocative anacolūthon anacolūtha

ReferencesEdit

  • “anacoluthon” in the Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, 1974 edition.
Last modified on 17 April 2014, at 12:39