Last modified on 9 December 2014, at 10:53

antique

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from French antique (ancient, old), from Latin antiquus (former, earlier, ancient, old), from ante (before); see ante- and antic.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

antique (comparative antiquer, superlative antiquest)

  1. Old, used especially of furniture and household items; out of date.
    • 1905, Baroness Emmuska Orczy, chapter 1, The Tremarn Case[1]:
      “There the cause of death was soon ascertained ; the victim of this daring outrage had been stabbed to death from ear to ear with a long, sharp instrument, in shape like an antique stiletto, which […] was subsequently found under the cushions of the hansom. […]”

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

antique (plural antiques)

  1. An old piece of furniture, household item, or other similar item.
  2. (figuratively, mildly pejorative) An old person.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

antique (third-person singular simple present antiques, present participle antiquing, simple past and past participle antiqued)

  1. (intransitive) To shop for antiques; to search for antiques.
  2. (transitive) To make an object appear to be an antique in some way.

External linksEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin antīquus.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

antique (masculine and feminine, plural antiques)

  1. ancient
  2. relating to the Antiquity

AnagramsEdit

External linksEdit


ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

antique

  1. feminine plural of antiquo

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

antīque

  1. vocative masculine singular of antīquus