Last modified on 2 September 2014, at 06:02

anyway

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

any +‎ way

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

anyway (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) In any way. [16th-19th c.]
    • 1621, Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy, II.2.5:
      He that sleeps in the day-time, or is in suspense, fear, anyway troubled in mind, or goes to bed upon a full stomach, may never hope for quiet rest in the night […].
  2. (conjunctive) Regardless; anyhow. [from 19th c.]
    He didn't enjoy washing his car, but it was so dirty that he did it anyway.
  3. (speech act) Used to indicate that a statement explains or supports a previous statement. See anyhow. [from 19th c.]
    I don't think that's true. I haven't found any evidence, anyway.
    • 1962, Bob Dylan, Don't Think Twice, It's All Right
      But I wish there were somethin' you would do or say / To try and make me change my mind and stay / We never did too much talkin' anyway / Don't think twice, it's all right.
  4. (speech act) Used to indicate a change of subject.
    • 2005, Jan Karon, These high, green hills:
      "I'll be ninety my next birthday, but Louella doesn't tell her age. Anyway, we 're going to have you and Cynthia up for supper."

SynonymsEdit

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