aquaintance

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

aquaintance (plural aquaintances)

  1. Common misspelling of acquaintance.
    • 1560, Peter Whitehorne, Machiavelli, Volume I[1]:
      And you must consider that this auctoritie, is gotten either by nature, or by accidente: and as to nature, it behoveth to provide, that he which is boren in one place, be not apoincted to the men billed in the same, but be made hedde of those places, where he hath not any naturall aquaintance.
    • 1614, Sir Thomas Overbury, “Characters”, in Character Writings of the 17th Century[2], published 1891:
      He entereth young men into aquaintance with debt-books.
    • 1886, The Quarterly Review, Volume 162, No. 324, April, 1886[3]:
      Yet in the Ignatian letters there is not the faintest aquaintance with the man or his teaching.
Last modified on 26 March 2012, at 17:30