avachir

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French avachir (to lose one's energy or force), from Old French avachir (to sag), from Old Frankish *waikijan (to soften), from Proto-Germanic *waikwijaną (to soften, make pliable, avoid), from Proto-Indo-European *weig-, *weik- (soft, pliable; to avoid). Cognate with Old High German weihjan (to soften), Old English wǣcan (to weaken, oppress, trouble), Old Norse veikja (to bow, make feeble, weaken). More at weak.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

avachir

  1. to make soft; make limp or flabby; cause to sag.
  2. to render incapable of producing effort.

ConjugationEdit

  • This is a regular verb of the second conjugation, like finir, choisir, and most other verbs with infinitives ending in -ir. One salient feature of this conjugation is the repeated appearance of the infix -iss-.

Derived termsEdit

Last modified on 2 February 2014, at 13:46