Last modified on 6 June 2014, at 08:03

babiller

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French, from Old French babiller (to stutter), from a root *bab- (compare also Middle French baboyer (to mumble)), probably of Germanic origin, from Old Dutch *babōn, *babelōn (to mumble, chatter, babble), from Proto-Germanic *babalōną (to chatter), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰa-bʰa-, *baba- (to talk vaguely, mumble). Cognate with Dutch babben (to babble), Middle Dutch babbelen (to babble), German pappeln (to stammer, babble), Icelandic babba and babla (to babble). More at babble.

VerbEdit

babiller

  1. to chat; to babble; to natter (to talk about insignificant things)

ConjugationEdit

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Old FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

babiller

  1. (often pejorative) to babble; to chatter; to natter

ConjugationEdit

  • This verb conjugates similarly to other verbs ending -er. However, in the present tense an extra supporting e is needed in the first-person singular indicative and throughout the singular subjunctive, and the third-person singular subjunctive ending -t is lost. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

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