Last modified on 16 June 2013, at 23:00

bag of fruit

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

bag of fruit (plural bag of fruits)

  1. (Australia, rhyming slang) A suit. [From 1924.][1]
    • 1995, Overland, Issues 138-141, page 46,
      Very few of the males wore the bag of fruit. ‘Suits’ were becoming the contemptuous synechdoche now used in reference to members of the executive/managerial elite.
    • 2003, Brian Castro, Shanghai Dancing, page 377,
      One had spent much time in Queensland. Ah! he said, fingering my jacket. Australian bag of fruit.
    • 2009, Rex Ellis, Go with the Flow, page 43,
      A few nights later Patti dug out my ‘bag of fruit’, but there was no way I was going to wear that.
    • 2011, Christopher Kremmer, The Chase, unnumbered page,
      The bloke's suit looked made-to-order for someone else's body, not so much a bag of fruit as a crate of it, and his hat band was twice the normal width, more like a bandana.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ 2007, Eric Partridge, Tom Dalzell, Terry Victor, The Concise New Partridge Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English, page 28.