See also: Bale and Bâle

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /beɪ̯l/, [ˈbeɪ̯(ə)ɫ], [beə̯ɫ]
  • Rhymes: -eɪl
  • Homophone: bail

Etymology 1Edit

Old English bealo, from Proto-Germanic *balwô. Cognate with Gothic 𐌱𐌰𐌻𐍅𐌴𐌹𐌽𐍃 (balweins, torture), Old High German balo (destruction), Old Norse bǫl (disaster).

NounEdit

bale (uncountable)

  1. Evil, especially considered as an active force for destruction or death.
  2. Suffering, woe, torment.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, VI.7:
      That other swayne, like ashes deadly pale, / Lay in the lap of death, rewing his wretched bale.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Old English bǣl, from Proto-Germanic *bēlō, from Proto-Indo-European. Cognate with Old Norse bál (which may have been the direct source for the English word).

NounEdit

bale (plural bales)

  1. (obsolete) A large fire, a conflagration or bonfire.
  2. (archaic) A funeral pyre.
  3. (archaic) A beacon-fire.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Precise derivation uncertain: perhaps from Old French bale, balle, from Medieval Latin balla (ball, rounded package), from Germanic; or perhaps from Dutch baal, itself borrowed from French.

NounEdit

bale (plural bales)

  1. A rounded bundle or package of goods in a cloth cover, and corded for storage or transportation.
  2. A bundle of compressed wool or hay, compacted for shipping and handling.
  3. A measurement of hay equal to 10 flakes. Approximately 70-90 lbs (32-41 kg).
  4. A measurement of paper equal to 10 reams.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
Coordinate termsEdit
See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

bale (third-person singular simple present bales, present participle baling, simple past and past participle baled)

  1. (transitive) To wrap into a bale.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

Alternative spelling of bail

VerbEdit

bale (third-person singular simple present bales, present participle baling, simple past and past participle baled)

  1. (UK, nautical) To remove water from a boat with buckets etc.
TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

bale

  1. singular present subjunctive of balen

AnagramsEdit


JavaneseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *balay, from Proto-Austronesian *balay.

NounEdit

bale

  1. pavilion

KapampanganEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Philippine *balay, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *balay, from Proto-Austronesian *balay.

NounEdit

bale

  1. house

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin root *baba. Cf. French bave, Italian bava, Spanish and Portuguese baba. The normal result, *ba, is not used as the singular has been replaced with bală through analogy.

NounEdit

bale f (plural)

  1. slobber, drool, dribble, saliva

Derived termsEdit

  • bălos

See alsoEdit


SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

bale

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of balar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of balar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of balar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of balar.

TurkishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from French ballet.

NounEdit

bale

  1. ballet
Last modified on 3 April 2014, at 05:32