baselard

EnglishEdit

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Alternative formsEdit

  • basilard, baslard

EtymologyEdit

From Old French baselard, basilard (early 14th century), in English from the later 14th century. Occurs in many spelling variants, including badelaire, baudelaire, Latinized badelare, bazelare, basalardus, balafardus, balasardus, etc. Probably in origin a corruption of German Basler (as pasler also attested from the early 14th century), probably short for Basler messer "knife of (made in, typical of) Basel".

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

baselard (plural baselards)

  1. a type of heavy dagger popular in the 14th and 15th centuries.
    • 1380s: "Sir John and Sir Geoffrey hath a girdle of silver, a baselard or a ballok knyf with buttons overgilt." (Piers Plowman)
    • 1519: "a hoked Baslarde is a perelse wepon with the Turkes." (Horman's Vulgaria)

ReferencesEdit

Last modified on 10 September 2013, at 02:42